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Guess We'll Go For It?

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Well, despite my hesitation, it looks like moving to a new host from my home based server might be a good idea. I received less than a 100 votes, but most said it was somewhat to quite a bit faster with a few stating about the same. No one reports slower response time.

Although it still wasn't a "true" test in that the site was not under load. We still only have one way to test the shared resources and that's to just send all traffic there.

In addition, I've received a few encouraging emails as well. Seems most are in favor of the move. In fact, no one has suggested the opposite.

So, at some point today I'll grab a last snapshot of the server and put up a redirect, then we'll see how it goes. If that works out well for a day or two, then I'll adjust the dns records and make it so.

If anyone has any just reason why tuxmachines and tektonic should not be lawfully joined together, speak now or forever hold your peace.

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nice

Well, I'll say one thing for sure: it sure is nice to have internet back. Big Grin I'd forgotten what it was like to surf fast what with sharing the line with the server.

Also, if this works out, I can download or bittorrent without fear of messing up my visitors.

Cross your fingers for us folks. Wink

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

nice, while it lasted...

Well, it doesn't appear that tektonic is gonna work out. Twice in the same 24 hour span of time the vserver became completely unresponsive and rendered my site offline. The site was offline for over 5 hours (and counting!) out of 15. This is unacceptable.

I monitored top very closely as well as resources in their web control panel. Too many times it showed really high cpu usage in the control panel while top reported very low. In addition, the number of apache process still remained low (10 or 12 with only 3 or 4 using between 4 and 8% of cpu) during these anomalies due to low number of visitors. Something just wasn't right.

I was running less than 1/2 the services on that vserver that I usually have going here on the home server running on an amd 2200. The only times I ever come close to using up all the cpu cycles on it is when compiling software.

We never did run out of ram. That was the one I was worried about when I signed up, but it never went over spikes of 79% usage, with the norm at about 50 and 60% - according to that control panel.

So, unless they can write back with some explanation and have moved me or the troublemaker to a different server, we're not going back.

Sorry folks, but slow is better than down.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: Spoken too soon

What kind of bullsh*t talk is this? Why should she need to give up control of the site just because Tuxmachines has moved to a hosting service? It's not like it was given to her for "free" with strings attached, it's a payed service.
I recon some advertisements might be necessary to help pay the bills since I doubt donations will cover the cost? (hint hint people) And the site sure isn't slow for me with 50+ visitors. it's much faster and more responsive than it ever was.

I'd say this is an improvement to the site and a good one too.

re: advertisement for TekTonic

TekTonic is just a hosting service [http://www.tektonic.net/] which you pay $$ to host your website, like any other hosting company out there, whether you want have ads on your site is up to you. They (TekTonic) does not require you to advertise anything for them or anyone else.
Whether srlinuxx wants to have ads on Tuxmachines it's up to her and not TekTonic. They could not care less who (if any) advertise on Tuxmachines or any other person/company whom they host. They charge for their service anyway and they have no say in in this matter.

EDIT: I think you are confused and are thinking of these people: http://www.tectonic.co.za/ The host spells its name with a K in the Tek and not a C Tec. I can see why you would worry if it was the other guys, which looks to have more ads than content.

Interesting experience...

I wondered why tuxmachines was so much slower than my server... you host it at home?

I'm looking into getting my own server (my sites are hosted on my wife's now), and when it's financially feasible I'll see if you'd like a hosting account. I know what a pain it is to find somebody you can host with without worrying about outages or bandwidth hogs or ridiculous amounts of advertising.

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