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Mark Shuttleworth Interview, Part I: on Dapper, and Ubuntu in the Enterprise

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Recently, Ubuntu founder and Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth spoke with The 451 Group at length about Dapper, Ubuntu, and the trends and development of the open source and free software movements as they relate to enterprise information technology. In this multi-part series, The 451 Group will present Shuttleworth’s comments along with insight and commentary from 451 Group analysts who cover the worlds of open source and enterprise software. . These include Rachel Chalmers, Martin Schneider, Raven Zachary and me, Nick Selby.

Ubuntu 6.06, the Dapper Drake, is scheduled to launch officially on 1 June. We’ve been running it here at The 451 Group for some months (in fact, this report was produced on it - see Open Source software at The 451 Group). In addition to its obvious desktop enhancements, much work has been done by the Ubuntu development team to appeal to a market which until recently seemed to have been beyond Ubuntu’s reach: the enterprise server.

When Shuttleworth originally suggested that the delay take place, the reasons given were to increase stability and reliability of Dapper, as well as devoting additional developer time to UI polish, to try to make Dapper stand out as a high-quality desktop operating system for large-scale deployment.

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