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Online tabloid gets out the BIG NEWS

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"CHILI-FINGER CHICK IN THE CLINK." There are subtler ways to describe the arrest of the woman who claims she found a finger in a serving of Wendy's chili.

But Sploid.com prefers screaming headlines and news roundups that mix the big stories of the day with ones the editors find amusing. The site recently posted a story about Alan Greenspan a few inches from a story about an animal rights activist in Philadelphia who took her clothes off. "NEARLY NAKED GAL PROTESTS SOMETHING" was the headline Sploid chose.

Some of the content on the site is bound to offend, and you never know what is going to be posted next. Last week, a note from a Sploid editor was peppered with foul language, and a warning accompanied links to graphic footage of a downed helicopter in Iraq.

Sploid, which debuted a few weeks ago, describes itself as a news site with a tabloid mentality. It's generated talk in Web media circles for the way it gathers information from places like CNN, the BBC, and the Washington Post and dresses up the content with headlines that dare you not to pay attention.

"VENEZUELA & USA ITCHING FOR WAR?" was the tease for a link to a Christian Science Monitor story on Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's concern over arms sales to the South American country. "GOLDEN GEEKS: GOOGLE BOYS WORTH $31B" linked visitors to a Yahoo stock chart on Google.

Sploid comes from Gawker Media, the same online venture that publishes buzzworthy sites like Wonkette.com, a humorous political site embraced by Washington's media elite for its take-no-prisoners, off-color humor.

The editors at Sploid describe their political slant as "anarcho-capitalist: sniffing out hypocrisy and absurdity, whether from salon left or religious right." That's a mouthful, and just another way of saying it's willing to poke fun at everybody.

Editor Choire Sicha, 33, says the site is mostly curating news for now. He and editor Ken Layne aim for what he calls 100-percent accuracy, but with a large dose of attitude.

"There isn't that much tabloid journalism in the U.S.," says Sicha. "There's plenty in the UK."

Full Story.

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