Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AMD to consider building chipsets

Filed under
Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD) may get into the business of manufacturing chipsets after it opens a new chip factory in 2006, company Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer Hector Ruiz said in an interview Monday.

For the most part, chipsets for AMD's processors are currently designed by partners such as Nvidia Corp., ATI Technologies Inc., and Via Technologies Inc., among others, who often hire other companies to manufacture the chipsets. AMD has previously said that it is not interested in building its own companion processor-chipset products like those made by its rival Intel (Profile, Products, Articles) Corp., but Ruiz said Monday that the company is not opposed to deeper ties with chipset partners that could involve manufacturing agreements.

If chipset vendors farm out chipset manufacturing to AMD, the company would benefit in various ways. For example, AMD would generate additional revenue from manufacturing capacity that would otherwise sit unused. It would also have increased control over the process of manufacturing chipsets, which are used in tandem with AMD's chips to control the flow of data around a system.

Right now, AMD does not plan to start developing its own chipset products for the mass market, Ruiz said.

AMD will have the capability to take on additional manufacturing work between late 2006 and early 2007, after a new state-of-the-art chip fabrication plant, or "fab," ramps up to full production in Dresden, Germany, adjacent to a current AMD fab. Growing shipments of the Sunnyvale, California, company's emerging products such as its low-cost Geode chips could take up some of that excess manufacturing capacity, but financial analysts are curious whether AMD has other plans in mind for its older chip-making equipment.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Firefox OS media-casting stick strikes Kickstarter gold

The first Firefox OS based media player has arrived on Kickstarter, in the form of a $25 open-spec HDMI stick that supports Chromecast-like content casting. The Matchstick, which has already zoomed past its Kickstarter campaign’s $100,000 funding goal, with 28 days still remaining, was teased back in June by Mozilla developer evangelist Christian Heilmann. The unnamed prototype was billed as an open source HDMI stick that runs Mozilla’s Linux-based Firefox OS and offers casting capabilities. Few details were revealed at the time except that the device used the same DIAL (DIscovery And Launch) media-casting protocol created by Netflix and popularized by Google’s Chromecast. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

Leftovers: Software

Proprietary

today's howtos