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Ubuntu Dapper Review

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Ubuntu

Another review of the upcoming Ubuntu Dapper Drake has surfaced onto the net today. Actually utilizing the Release Candidate from approximately a week ago, this review goes into some detail about how to get some multimedia working as well as XGL and a few other things.

Tomorrow (June 1) Ubuntu should be releasing their final version of Dapper and to get ready for that, this review of the release candidate will cover some of the qualities of the new operating system as well as tips on getting Dapper optimized for desktop usage. As for my impressions of Dapper itself, I would enthusiastically say that Dapper is amazing! Without a doubt, I can say positively that this is the best linux distro I have ever used. From the simplicity of having to download just one cd iso image for installation, to having the option to have the installation discs mailed to you at no cost, and to the beauty and speed of the apt-get system, as well as a promised 5 year support cycle, and the best community forum for the times when you are stumped on a problem, makes Ubuntu Dapper the best Linux operating system I have used to date. Some of the noteworthy changes for Ubuntu’s Dapper :

* The 386 installation disc uses the LiveCD method for installatin
* Faster Boot Time as well as faster Gnome start process
* New Artwork with improved Human theme
* Refined GDM Login Screen
* Better Menu Organization
* Update notifier modified with new look and restart notificiation dialog box
* Improved Add/Remove application to help new users install applications
* Graphical .dec package installer (gdebi)
* New Log Out Dialog
* Multimedia backend now uses Gstreamer 0.10
* Window Server now uses X-org 7
* Gnome 2.14.1
* Support for new hardware (SATA & SATA RAID devices)
* Improved Wireless support
* Improved Plug-n-Play for usb devices

To read the review the and learn some tips on setting up your Ubuntu Dapper read further….

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