Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu Linux: Free and Fabulous

Filed under

"I'm going to just come right out and say it: I absolutely adore Ubuntu Linux 5.04 (the "Hoary Hedgehog" release, often referred to as "Hoary"). I'm now running Ubuntu on both my laptop and my desktop PCs, and I don't think I've ever been such a happy Linux user."

Full Story

I think I need a pill...

It would appear that the (k)Ubuntu bandwagon has been retro-fitted with rockets. For the life of me I cannot figure out why. Before I say any more, my hat is off to Mark Shuttleworth for the money and exposure he is pouring into Linux. This is exactly the activity we need, however the actual distribution "ain't all that"....least from what I can see. I installed Kubuntu on my 12 year old daughters computer and I have to say it is crisp and pretty, but the gyrations one must perform to get it working properly are too many for the new user. The New User is what it is all about folks...and I will say it over and over. For those who are following it, There is a blog that is now featuring an "average" user discovering Linux. She has tested 4 out 5 distros and will announce a winner at the end of the experiment. Visit to catch up on the progress of this testing. Until Linux begins developing for my mom or sister, both terribly lacking in computer skills, Linux will not become a main player on the desktop. Sometimes given the attitudes of a few developers I've met, I think this is being done on purpose. I hate to think that way, but it isn't passing the smell test. (K)Ubuntu is a fine effort for those who are comfortable with Linux but for the's a frustrating experience.


"Telling a drug addict to just say no is like telling a manic depressive to just cheer up" - Abby Hoffman, God Rest Him

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Video: PBS Pro Workload Manager Goes Open Source
  • Turris Omnia: high-security, high-performance, open-source router
    An Indigogo campaign was recently launched for the Turis Omnia, promising backers a high-security, high-performance, open-source router. “With powerful hardware, Turris Omnia can handle gigabit traffic and still be able to do much more,” the company said. “You can use it as a home server, NAS, printserver, and it even has a virtual server built-in.”
  • IBM SystemML Machine Learning Technology Goes Open-Source
  • PuppetLabs Introduces Application Orchestration
    Everybody loves Puppet! Or at the very least, an awful lot of people USE Puppet and in the IT world, “love” is often best expressed by the opening of one’s wallet. I know, in the FOSS world wallets are unnecessary, and Puppet does indeed have an Open Source version. However, once one gets to enterprise-level computing, a tool designed for enterprise scale is preferable and usually there is a cost associated. Puppet was originally started as an open source project by Luke Kanies in 2005, essentially out of frustration with the other configuration management products available at the time. Their first commercial product was released in 2011, and today it is the most widely used configuration management tool in the world with about 30,000 companies running it. According to our own surveys, better than 60% of Linux Journal readers use some form of Puppet already and you must like it too as it regularly finishes at or near the top in Readers’ Choice awards.

today's howtos

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Continues To Focus On The Linux 4.4 Kernel

Ubuntu's kernel team continues to be focused on having Linux 4.4 for Ubuntu 16.04. Linux 4.4 is their target for the "Xenial Xerus" since Ubuntu 16.04 is to be a Long-Term Support release and the upstream 4.4 kernel is also being maintained as a long-term release too. Additionally, Linux 4.5 would come too close to the April debut of Ubuntu 16.04 that the developers wouldn't feel comfortable, particularly for an LTS release. Read more

Will Steam Machine Solve Linux’s Gaming Woes?

The Steam machine is now publicly on sale as of last week, but it’s not off to the best start. A couple of weeks ago, Ars Technica compared the performance of games when running on Valve’s Linux based SteamOS and Windows 10. Six Valve games were tested on a single machine and results showed a 21 to 58 percent frame rate drop when running on Linux. While only six games were tested out of an entire collection of around 1,800 available titles, the games used Valve’s own Source engine, which is designed for Linux and SteamOS. Valve had previously stated that Steam games run faster on Linux, so it was expected that any of Valve’s own Source engine games would run smoothly. Read more