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Review: Mandriva Limited Edition 2005

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MDV
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Shortly after announcing the merger of Mandrakesoft and Conectiva into Mandriva, the newly combined company released a transitional "limited edition" GNU/Linux distribution to bridge the gap between the two parent distributions. Mandriva Limited Edition 2005 may look a little different, but it's the same great Mandrakelinux desktop distribution that you're used to.

Mandriva has changed more cosmetically in this version than Mandrakelinux has in the past several releases. While the Galaxy theme is still the default, there are new splash screens and graphical changes here and there that make you feel like you're using a different -- or at least newer -- distribution.

Mandriva is, as Mandrake was, a user-friendly desktop distribution that focuses on providing the newest tested software available. Mandriva Linux presents a themed KDE-based desktop with intelligently designed, easy-to-navigate menus. Configuration tools such as HardDrake, DrakConf, and MenuDrake make desktop system administration simple.

The distribution recognizes external hardware and automatically configures it. Flash drives and removable media are automounted and given an icon on the desktop.

Full Review.

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