Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Automotive bus open sourced with Linux-based design

Filed under
Linux
OSS

A German university is open sourcing a secure, two-tier Automotive Service Bus for car computers, available on a control unit running Linux on a PandaBoard.

Technische Universität München (TUM) has open-sourced an automotive computer bus design developed as part of its “Visio.M” (Visionary Mobility) electric car project, according a Mar. 10 press release by TUM. Next week at the CeBIT show in Hanover, Germany, TUM will demonstrate the carbon fiber Visio.M prototype, which was backed by the German government with 7.1 million Euros, as well as the car’s newly open “Automotive Service Bus.”

Read more

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • A Quick Look At Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. 20.10 With The Core i9 10900K - Phoronix

    With Ubuntu 20.10 due for release this week I have begun testing near-final Ubuntu 20.10 builds on many more systems in the lab. Larger than our normal distribution/OS comparisons, here is the culmination of running hundreds of benchmarks (366 tests to be exact) under both Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with all available updates and then again on the Ubuntu 20.10 development state while testing on Intel Comet Lake. Aside from specific improvements for bleeding-edge hardware like Intel Tiger Lake performing better on Ubuntu 20.10 or when looking at cases like the Intel and Radeon graphics performance being better on Ubuntu 20.10 due to the newer Linux kernel and Mesa, for general CPU/system workloads the performance has largely been found to be similar to that of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. The other caveat is for workloads being built from source, Ubuntu 20.10 now ships with GCC 10 rather than GCC 9. GCC 10 doesn't normally yield any night-and-day differences in performance but in some cases for newer CPU microarchitectures there has been some improvements there or with features like LTO.

  • TSDgeos' blog: Make sure KDE software is usable in your language, join KDE translations!

    Translations are a vital part of software. More technical people often overlook it because they understand English well enough to use the software untranslated, but only 15% of the World understands English, so it's clear we need good translations to make our software more useful to the rest of the world. Translations are a place that [almost] always needs help, so I would encourage you to me (aacid@kde.org) if you are interested in helping. Sadly, some of our teams are not very active, so you may find yourself alone, it can be a bit daunting at the beginning, but the rest of us in kde-i18n-doc will help you along the way :)

  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site. [...] The current target for final release is December 8, 2020. This is just seven weeks away, so your help is needed to ensure this release is tested properly.

  • Google Patches Bug Used in Active Attacks Against Chrome

    Google has discovered and patched a serious vulnerability in Chrome that attackers are actively exploiting at the moment. The bug is a high-severity heap buffer overflow in FreeType, a free font-rendering engine that Chrome, among many other projects, uses. A member of Google’s Project Zero vulnerability research team discovered the vulnerability and subsequently found that attackers were already exploiting it. Google patched the flaw in Chrome 86.0.4240.111 for desktop browsers and the maintainers of the FreeType Project pushed out an emergency release of the library to fix it, as well. “I've just fixed a heap buffer overflow that can happen for some malformed .ttf files with PNG sbit glyphs. It seems that this vulnerability gets already actively used in the wild, so I ask all users to apply the corresponding commit as soon as possible,” Werner Lemberg, one of the original authors of the FreeType, said in an email to the FreeType announcement mailing list.

  • FreeType 2.10.4 Rushed Out As Emergency Security Release

    The FreeType text rendering library is out with version 2.10.4 today as an important security update.

  • Intel: replace thermal compound “every few years”

    Thermal compound (sometimes called thermal paste or grease) is applied to fill minuscule gaps in the materials in the heat spreader (the metal covering on top of the processor) and the heatsink. Eliminating these gaps is essential to ensuring efficient heat transfer into the heatsink. The thermal compound that is used in your computer generally won’t go bad or degrade in its useful lifespan. It will get displaced over time, however. You’d need higher temperatures than what you’ll typically find in a computer for other failure modes to come into effect. The displacement is caused by thermal cycling that results in an effect known as “thermally induced pump-out.” As the components heat up and cool down, the processors’ heat spreader (its metal top) and the heatsink will expand and contract. This effect will, over time, pump the thermal compound out from in between the two metal plates. You can find illustrations and a more technical explanation in the source links below.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • IBM Launches Call For Code For Racial Justice [Ed: IBM trying to flip reality on its head]

    These include Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability; Diverse Representation; and Policy & Legislation Reform.

  • Node.js 15 release: Updated handling of rejections, npm 7, N-API Version 7, and more – IBM Developer

    Users can plan for a new release every April and October, with the latest even-numbered release (14.x, in this instance) being promoted to LTS in October. Since the 15.x release is an odd-numbered release, it won’t be promoted to LTS. The predictable timetable for quality releases has increased adoption of the next LTS release over time. In general we recommend that only LTS releases be used for production deployments. Today, the Node.js community is releasing Node.js 15 with new features that are important to Node.js users and customers. While it won’t be promoted to long-term support (LTS), we need our customers and the greater ecosystem to try it out and give us feedback to help pave the way for the Node.js 16 release.

  • Key findings from IDC Red Hat Quarkus Lab Validation

    Recently, Arnal Dayaratna, a research director and analystocused on Software Development at IDC, explored Quarkus in an IDC Lab Validation report, sponsored by Red Hat. The report quantifies performance metrics forQuarkus to another widely used Java framework for cloud-native development, referred to throughout as Framework A. The comparison is based on attributes that are important for developers and the developer experience, as well as those that are important for containers, Kubernetes and cloud deployments.

  • Accelerated development cycle enables Macquarie deployments in near real time, addressing business and technical challenges

    As companies continue their quest for digital transformation and face uncertainty in the business environment, especially in current times, the ability to react in an agile manner to address customers’ needs is increasingly apparent. It is a proven strategy cited by industry research and consulting firms, and has delivered results for Macquarie’s Banking and Financial Services Group (BFS), as it modernizes its legacy banking systems.

Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’

  • Over 60 Global Organizations Join in Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’ to Build the Next Decade of Infrastructure for AI, 5G, Edge
  • OpenStack Foundation Becomes Open Infrastructure Foundation

    The OpenStack Foundation is changing its name to the Open Infrastructure Foundation (OIF), a move that mirrors the rebranding of the project’s OpenStack Summit to Open Infrastructure Summit. The changes, according to the press release, reflect “an expansion of the organization’s mission, scope and community to advance open source over the next decade to support open infrastructure.” As Frederic Lardinois reports for TechCrunch, the OpenStack project itself, “which helps enterprises run their private cloud, found its niche in the telecom space, though, and continues to thrive as one of the world’s most active open source projects.” Last week, OpenStack released a new major version (called Victoria), which includes more than 20,000 code changes.

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Ghanshyam Mann at NEC

    Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you. Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful. [...] What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack? I have my team working in different open source communities and discuss daily on how each community works and solves the issue. Based on that, I found the OpenStack community is more open and transparent (our four opens strength). We might not be perfect but we are definitely one of the best open source communities. There is no specific advice as such, but I will suggest keep doing the same and never compromise on defined four opens principles.

Mozilla: Rust, Volunteers and Spying

  • Marking issues as regressions

    The Rust project gets many issues filed every day, and we need to keep track of them all to make sure we don't miss anything. To do that we use GitHub's issue labels feature, and we need your help to make sure we fix regressions as soon as possible! We have many issue labels that help us organize our issues, and we have a few in particular that mark an issue as a regression. These labels will ping a Rust working group called the prioritization working group, whose members will work to determine the severity of an issue and then prioritize it. But, this won't happen unless someone marks the issue with one of those labels!

  • New Contributors, Firefox 82 – about:community

    With Firefox 82 hot off the byte presses, we are pleased to welcome the developers whose first code contributions shipped in this release, 18 of whom were new volunteers!

  • Defining Data Intuition

    Last week, one of my peers asked me to explain what I meant by "Data Intuition", and I realized I really didn't have a good definition. That's a problem! I refer to data intuition all the time! Data intuition is one of the three skills I interview new data scientists for (along with statistics and technical skills). In fact, I just spent the first nine months of 2020 building Mozilla's data intuition. I'm really surprised to realize I can't point to a good explanation of what I'm trying to cultivate.

  • Five-Year Moziversary – chuttenblog

    In team news, Georg’s short break turned into the neverending kind as he left Mozilla late last year. We gained Michael Droettboom as our new fearless leader, and from my perspective he seems to be doing quite well at the managery things. Bea and Travis, our two newer team members, have really stepped into their roles well, providing much needed bench depth on Rust and Mobile. And Jan-Erik has taken over leadership of the SDK, freeing up Alessio to think about data collection for Web Extensions. 2020 is indeed being the Year of Glean on the Desktop with several projects already embedding the now-successful Glean SDK, including our very own mach (Firefox Build Tooling Commandline) and mozregression (Firefox Bug Regression Window Finding Tool). Oh, and Jan-Erik and I’ve spent ten months planning and executing on Project FOG (Firefox on Glean) (maybe you’ve heard of it), on track (more or less) to be able to recommend it for all new data collections by the end of the year.