Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Taking Puppy for a short walk

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Puppy 2.0 was released several days ago and I'd been quite anxious to find the time to look at it. This major release brings about some significant changes to the underlying code as well as some visible changes - most notably the mozilla-seamonkey suite and kernel 2.6.16.7.



There aren't a whole lot of gui changes, although we now have a new background. Again, it's a tranquil generic skyscape, but this time it does state the distro and version number. The desktop holds a few more icons than previously for convenient access to some of the more commonly used applications like inkscape, xine, and gnumeric. You immediately know that your sound is working from the "woof woof" one hears when their desktop appears with an introduction in dillo.

        

The developers state that they've completely rewritten the whole startup process and indicate they've improved hardware detection. Although I still had to run the "connect" script upon boot, it did detect my ethernet card and obtain a lease from my dhcpd server. Another change this release is the ram recommendation. Previously 128mb was recommended, but the developers now state this might be a bit low to run the heavier applications such as seamonkey.

Some of the listed changes include:

  • Redesign of the underlying architecture of Puppy for streamlined
    booting from any media, running in a wide range of environments, and
    installation to any media, including CD/DVD, hard drive, USB, Zip.
  • Total rewrite of the boot and shutdown scripts for maximum flexibility.
    No longer does Puppy automatically create a personal save-file on the
    hard drive -- now you are in control and choose exactly where you want it
    (note, you make the choice at the first shutdown). You can even save
    personal files/settings to a floppy disk!
  • Total rewrite of the main Wizards, in particular the Puppy Universal Installer and the CD/DVD Simple Remaster Wizards.
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey suite, with web browser, composer, mail & news and addressbook.
  • Inkscape vector editor.
  • GParted graphical drive partitioning tool.
  • Geany editor replaces the aging Beaver.
  • Perl v5.8.0.
  • Great little applets for the taskbar, to display free memory, volume control, network status.
  • There is considerably more automatic hardware detection, with loading of the correct kernel modules.
  • Kernel version 2.6.16.7.
  • working automatic mouse detection
  • Automatic serial modem detection for true hardware modems
  • Pupsafe - a layer of protection above root.
  • ALSA replaces OSS
  • Bash as default shell
  • Many more little utility applications

        

Control Panel, Setup apps, and Utilities

        

Information Managers, Help File, and Search Tools

        

Multimedia Apps, Games, and File Managers

        

Internet Apps, Networking Tools, and Graphic Processing

    

Word Processors and Mozilla Seamonkey

There are a lot of terrific improvements, especially with hardware detection and setup. It is still the same small fast useful distro to which we've grown accustommed while being updated with a modern kernel and other great additions. Despite ho hum appearances, it's a great little distro and has a fine selection of tools and apps that can be used as a rescue system, to resurrect older computers, or as an everyday workhorse.

Puppy Homepage.
Download Puppy 2.0.
Previous Coverage.

More in Tux Machines

Bodhi and Enlightenment

  • Bodhi 4.0.0 Distro Enters Development, Alpha Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Bodhi Linux developer Jeff Hoogland was proud to announce recently the release and general availability of the first Alpha milestone towards the Bodhi 4.0.0 operating system. Bodhi 4.0.0 Alpha is right on schedule, according to Mr. Hoogland, and it marks the start of the development cycle of the upcoming GNU/Linux distribution built around the lightweight and modern Moksha desktop environment, a continuation of the Enlightenment 17 window manager.
  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Alpha released
  • Enlightenment 0.20.10 Is the Last in the Series, Users Urged to Upgrade to 0.21
    A new stable version of the Enlightenment 0.20 lightweight and modern desktop environment/window manager has arrived, Enlightenment 0.20.10, which is the last one in the series. Yes, you're reading it right, the development cycle of the Enlightenment 0.20 series has come to an end, and if you're still using this version on your GNU/Linux operating system, you are urged to either upgrade to the Enlightenment 0.20.10 maintenance release or move to the newest stable branch, Enlightenment 0.21.0.

Linux Graphics

  • X.Org Server 1.18.4 Brings over 60 Improvements to GNU/Linux Operating Systems
    A new maintenance update of the X.Org Server 1.18 display server software for GNU/Linux operating systems, version 1.18.4, has arrived with over 60 improvements. As usual, Adam Jackson was the one to make the announcement, and it looks like X.Org Server 1.18.4 comes approximately three and a half months after the release of the previous maintenance version, X.Org Server 1.18.3, promising to add lots of backports from the devel branch, primarily in XWayland, Glamor, and Kernel Mode Setting (KMS). However, looking at the internal changelog, we can notice that X.Org Server 1.18.4 introduces improvements for several other drivers and components, including, but not limited to, XQuartz, RandR, x86emu, XFree86, KDrive, xf86Crtc, EXA, GLX, DIX/PTraccel, XKB, as well as Xi.
  • Igalia's Work On The Intel Mesa Driver The Past Year
  • DRM Text Mode Proposed As Alternative To FBDEV/FBCON
    There's long been talk on killing FBDEV and getting rid of CONFIG_VT with a modern replacement making more use of DRM/KMS drivers, but so far none of those efforts have fully panned out.

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • Telco central offices could be in for open source makeover
    The CORD Summit, hosted by the Open Networking Lab (On.Lab) and The Linux Foundation, promotes the use of technologies such as Network Functions Virtualization (NFV), software-defined networking (SDN) and the cloud "to bring datacenter economics and cloud agility to service providers' Central Office." CORD is kind of an acronym for Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter, and is designed to benefit enterprise, residential and wireless networks. A mini version of this event was held in March as part of the broader Open Networking Summit.
  • Some of The Other Pull Requests Arriving For Linux 4.8 This Week
    I've already written more than a dozen various bits of information about the Linux 4.8 kernel this week covering the big pull requests / subsystem updates.
  • More Last Minute AMDGPU/Radeon Changes For Linux 4.8
    There already have been the main pull requests for the AMDGPU/Radeon DRM drivers for DRM-Next that in turn will land in Linux 4.8 next week.
  • Linux Kernel 3.14.74 LTS Has Updated Drivers, ARM, MIPS and x86 Improvements
    After informing the community about the availability of the Linux 4.6.5 and Linux 4.4.16 LTS kernel versions for GNU/Linux operating systems, Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the seventy-fourth maintenance update for Linux 3.14 LTS.

Debian News

  • Contributing with Debian Recommendation System
    Hi, my name is Luciano Prestes, I am participating in the program Google Summer of Code (GSoC), my mentor is Antonio Terceiro, and my co-mentor is Tassia Camoes, both are Debian Developers. The project that I am contributing is the AppRecommender, which is a package recommender for Debian systems, my goal is to add a new strategy of recommendation to AppRecommender, to make it recommend packages after the user installs a new package with 'apt'. At principle AppRecommender has three recommendation strategies, being them, content-based, collaborative and hybrid. To my work on GSoC this text explains two of these strategies, content-based and collaborative. Content-based strategy get the user packages and analyzes yours descriptions to find another Debian packages that they are similar to the user packages, so AppRecommender uses the content of user packages to recommender similar packages to user. The collaborative strategy compare the user packages with the packages of another users, and then recommends packages that users with similar profile have, where a profile of user is your packages. On her work, Tassia Camoes uses the popularity-contest data to compare the users profiles on the collaborative strategy, the popularity-contest is an application that get the users packages into a submission and send to the popularity-contest server and generates statistical data analyzing the users packages.
  • Looking for the artwork for the next Debian release
    Each release of Debian has a shiny new theme, which is visible on the boot screen, the login screen and, most prominently, on the desktop wallpaper. Debian plans to release Stretch next year. As ever, we need your help in creating its theme! You have the opportunity to design a theme that will inspire thousands of people while working in their Debian systems.
  • SteamOS 2.87 Arrives with Support for Nvidia GTX 1080/1070, AMD "Bonaire" GPUs
    Today, July 29, 2016, Valve announced the availability for download of a new stable version of its Debian-based GNU/Linux operating system designed for gaming, SteamOS 2.87. After being in the Beta stages of the development for the past two months, SteamOS 2.87 is now the latest stable and most advanced version of the gaming OS developed by Valve for personal computers and Steam Machines. It comes as a replacement for the previous stable release, SteamOS 2.70, announced back in April 2016. Prominent new features of SteamOS 2.87 include the availability of updated Nvidia and AMD Radeon graphics drivers, version 367.27 and AMDGPU-PRO 16.30 respectively, which now offer support for the recently announced Nvidia GTX 1080 and GTX 1070 GPUs, as well as for the "Bonaire" GPUs.