Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Taking Puppy for a short walk

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Puppy 2.0 was released several days ago and I'd been quite anxious to find the time to look at it. This major release brings about some significant changes to the underlying code as well as some visible changes - most notably the mozilla-seamonkey suite and kernel 2.6.16.7.



There aren't a whole lot of gui changes, although we now have a new background. Again, it's a tranquil generic skyscape, but this time it does state the distro and version number. The desktop holds a few more icons than previously for convenient access to some of the more commonly used applications like inkscape, xine, and gnumeric. You immediately know that your sound is working from the "woof woof" one hears when their desktop appears with an introduction in dillo.

        

The developers state that they've completely rewritten the whole startup process and indicate they've improved hardware detection. Although I still had to run the "connect" script upon boot, it did detect my ethernet card and obtain a lease from my dhcpd server. Another change this release is the ram recommendation. Previously 128mb was recommended, but the developers now state this might be a bit low to run the heavier applications such as seamonkey.

Some of the listed changes include:

  • Redesign of the underlying architecture of Puppy for streamlined
    booting from any media, running in a wide range of environments, and
    installation to any media, including CD/DVD, hard drive, USB, Zip.
  • Total rewrite of the boot and shutdown scripts for maximum flexibility.
    No longer does Puppy automatically create a personal save-file on the
    hard drive -- now you are in control and choose exactly where you want it
    (note, you make the choice at the first shutdown). You can even save
    personal files/settings to a floppy disk!
  • Total rewrite of the main Wizards, in particular the Puppy Universal Installer and the CD/DVD Simple Remaster Wizards.
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey suite, with web browser, composer, mail & news and addressbook.
  • Inkscape vector editor.
  • GParted graphical drive partitioning tool.
  • Geany editor replaces the aging Beaver.
  • Perl v5.8.0.
  • Great little applets for the taskbar, to display free memory, volume control, network status.
  • There is considerably more automatic hardware detection, with loading of the correct kernel modules.
  • Kernel version 2.6.16.7.
  • working automatic mouse detection
  • Automatic serial modem detection for true hardware modems
  • Pupsafe - a layer of protection above root.
  • ALSA replaces OSS
  • Bash as default shell
  • Many more little utility applications

        

Control Panel, Setup apps, and Utilities

        

Information Managers, Help File, and Search Tools

        

Multimedia Apps, Games, and File Managers

        

Internet Apps, Networking Tools, and Graphic Processing

    

Word Processors and Mozilla Seamonkey

There are a lot of terrific improvements, especially with hardware detection and setup. It is still the same small fast useful distro to which we've grown accustommed while being updated with a modern kernel and other great additions. Despite ho hum appearances, it's a great little distro and has a fine selection of tools and apps that can be used as a rescue system, to resurrect older computers, or as an everyday workhorse.

Puppy Homepage.
Download Puppy 2.0.
Previous Coverage.

More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi powered juggling performance

Flashing pins are spinning tens of feet into the air on a pitch dark stage. It's a juggling performance. All of the pins are perfectly synchronized to flash different colors in time to the music. It's part of the magic of theater and a special night out with friends to enjoy a distraction from daily life. Part of the magic—and why it's called magic—is that the audience doesn't know how these secrets are made backstage. Read more

Munich Reversal Turnaround, Linus on the Desktop, and Red Hat Time Protocol

Monday we reported that Munich was throwing in the Linux towel, but today we find that may not be exactly the case. In other news, Linus Torvalds today said he still wants the desktop. There are lots of other LinuxCon links and a few gaming posts to highlight. And finally today, Red Hat's Eric Dube explains RHEL 7's new time protocol. Read more

NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions. Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”. The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”. Read more

What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more