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Bazel: Google Build Tool is now Open Source

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Google
OSS

Bazel, the tool that Google uses to build the majority of its software has been partially open sourced. According to Google, Bazel is aimed to build “code quickly and reliably” and is “critical to Google’s ability to continue to scale its software development practices as the company grows.”

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Also: Q&A: Databases, Open Source & Virtualisation with CEO Vinay Joosery

More in Tux Machines

Linux Does Windows and ASUS Gaming Laptops

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    It's looking like Paragon Software's "NTFS3" read-write Linux driver for Microsoft's NTFS file-system is on a trajectory where we could see it land possibly with the Linux 5.11 kernel kicking off at year's end. Friday marked the eleventh iteration of these patches that Paragon previously offered to commercial customers but is now in the process of being upstreamed. It's been an interesting journey since Paragon announced in August their NTFS3 driver that they were interested in upstreaming to the mainline Linux kernel to ultimately replace the existing NTFS kernel driver that is predominantly read-only and not actively maintained. Now that they don't have much commercial life left out of their NTFS driver, they are looking to upstream it while still supporting it.

  • Linux 5.11 To Properly Support The Keyboard Of Newer ASUS Gaming Laptops - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.11 kernel will bring support for the ASUS "N-Key" keyboard that is used by nearly all of the current ASUS gaming laptops. This keyboard has a product ID of 0x1866 and basically used across the current line-up of ASUS gaming laptops. Standard keyboard functionality works with existing kernels, but the next cycle will bring support for the function keys and other controls.

today's howtos

  • How the OpenBSD -stable packages are built

    In this long blog post, I will write about the technical details of the OpenBSD stable packages building infrastructure. I have setup the infrastructure with the help of Theo De Raadt who provided me the hardware in summer 2019, since then, OpenBSD users can upgrade their packages using pkg_add -u for critical updates that has been backported by the contributors. Many thanks to them, without their work there would be no packages to build. Thanks to pea@ who is my backup for operating this infrastructure in case something happens to me.

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  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Magazine #162

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    For those who live in a part of the world that celebrates it, Happy Halloween! May the only creepy-crawly bugs you encounter today be a part of your spooky decorations at home, and not a part of a production server at work. Halloween has always been a big deal here at Red Hat, dating back to the October 31 release of our first Linux distribution way back in 1994. It's also the time of year we host We Are Red Hat Week, a celebration of our unique open source culture. While in a normal year this would include lots of in person festivities, this year we're all remote, but here's a look back at our celebration from last year.

  • Adjust Color Temperature of Your Screen Using Terminal in Ubuntu

    In this quick guide, I will show how you can adjust the color temperature of your screen in Ubuntu using the terminal. No additional GUI installation is required and you can enjoy the night light even if your desktop environment doesn't provide a native one.

  • Install LibreELEC on Raspberry Pi to Replace Your Smart TV OS

    Don’t like ads on your smart TV? This tutorial is going to show you how to replace your TV OS with LibreELEC (Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) and a Raspberry Pi. LibreELEC is a free open-source Linux distribution for embedded devices used as home media centers. It is a fork of the now-discontinued OpenELEC project, which itself is based on Kodi. After installing LibreELEC on a Rasberry Pi, you can download Movies, TV shows on Usenet, or torrent.

  • Advanced Copy - Add Progress Bar To cp And mv Commands In Linux - OSTechNix

    The GNU cp and GNU mv tools are used to copy and move files and directories in GNU/Linux operating system. One missing feature in these two utilities is they don't show you any progress bar. If you copy a large file or directory, you really don't know how long the copy process would take to complete, or the percentage of data copied. You will not see which file is currently being copied, or how many were already copied. All you will see is just the blinking cursor and the hard drive LED indicator. Thanks to Advanced Copy, a patch for Gnu Coreutils, we can now add progress bar to cp and mv commands in Linux and show the progress bar while copying and/or moving large files and directories. Advanced Copy is a mod for the GNU cp and GNU mv programs. It adds a progress bar and provides some information on what's going on while you copy or move files and folders. Not only the progress bar, it also shows the data transfer rate, estimated time remaining and the file name that is currently being copied. At the end you will see a short summary on how many files are copied and how long it took to copy the files.

  • How to Install Python 3.9 on Amazon Linux – TecAdmin

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  • as days pass by — Setting up a Brother DCP-7055W as a network scanner on Ubuntu

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Software: Psensor, Video Players and Cockpit

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