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That's 'Mr Scarface' to you...

Filed under
Gaming

Radical Entertainment knows all about turning big licensed properties into big-selling videogames. With crazily popular hits like Simpsons Hit & Run (and the somewhat less successful Hulk game) under its belt, it's perhaps no surprise to see the Canadian team taking its experience of making sandbox Grand Theft Alsos into a darker crime-filled territory; in this case the cocaine smuggling world of Tony Montana, star of '80s classic Scarface.

Now, simply making a game based around the events of the movie was clearly never going to work. Either the team could do the classic fallback of doing a prequel about how Montana got where he was, or mess with the history and do one of those "ooh, what would have happened if he had survived that manic mansion scene at the end?" kind of affairs. Clearly the latter won out, and that's where we pick up the thread as we grill the game's producer Cam Webber on what he claims will become one of this year's biggest hits...

Eurogamer: How is Scarface going to work as a game, given that the game's starting point is actually at the end of the movie?

Cam Webber: We wanted to start out with the biggest scene of the movie, the mansion shoot out, so we start you out in Tony's office, his sister's just died, he grabs his M16 with a grenade launcher attachment. All of his men and his crew have been slaughtered by Sosa's army. Basically you're gonna shoot your way out of the whole situation, you'll escape into the night. So there's a big epic opening shooting mission, Tony escapes out of Miami for three months, comes back to Miami to discover that all of his territory in that area has been taken over by his old competitors - these are all characters from the movie.
So Sosa's working through them in Miami. Tony vows to get his revenge on Sosa, and in the process he also vows to rebuild his empire and take back what he's lost, so there's a very powerful emotional connection of Tony wanting to get back what he had before.

Rest of interview with screenshots.

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