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top 10 tips dealing with vi editor

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as a unix/linux system admin, my main text editor is vi/vim, since it is available in most of the unixes. still remember when i first started using it, not really an easy job man! but now i'm quite comfortable with it and would like to share my top 10 tips when dealing with this editor, in no particular order:

1. undo & redo
don't be surprise that vi also have undo & redo capabilities. but for vi is only one level undo. not really sure how many level for vim, for sure more than vi. just press u to find out.
Esc + u or :u to undo
Ctrl + r to redo

2. search pattern

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