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Exploring the Ubuntu Professional Certification

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Ubuntu

The newest certification available in the Unix/Linux world is that of Ubuntu Professional. Scheduled to become available worldwide through Pearson VUE and Prometric testing centers later this quarter, it debuted at LinuxWorld in Johannesburg, South Africa in May. The certification has been created through an alliance between Canonical, Ubuntu, and the Linux Professional Institute (LPI).

Ubuntu is currently one of the fastest growing distributions in the Linux world. Based on an African word meaning “humanity to others”, Ubuntu is completely free — as are the tools needed to modify it and make it fit your specific application. It runs on the x86 platform, as well as AMD64 and PowerPC.

To become certified as a Ubuntu Professional, it is necessary to first become Level I certified by LPI (LPIC-1), which requires passing two exams on vendor-neutral Linux topics. Following that, you must pass one more exam ($150) specific to Ubuntu. At this time, the exact number of questions that will be on that exam, and the length of time allotted for it, are unknown but it is expected it will mirror the two Level 1 LPI exams (~60 questions in 90 minutes).

There are five major topic areas that the exam focuses upon, and they are weighted as follows:

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