Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Turner tapping into game market

Filed under
Gaming

While most online PC gamers pay a monthly fee for access to just one game, Time Warner is hoping that they will pay up to play more. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner subsidiary, hopes to grab subscribers by offering nearly 1,000 games for unlimited play through its new GameTap Broadband Entertainment Network.

The service, announced today, will offer games and video content from a variety of sources for the same price as most MMO subscriptions. The service should launch this fall, and will run through a client program developed internally at Turner. Reps for the company equated the service to a "cable box for games on your PC."

Currently, 17 publishers are signed on to provide games, though TBS spokespersons expect that number to rise to 21 by the time the service launches this fall. No exact launch date or price point have yet been announced.

GameTap will be a PC-only gaming service, but that does not mean that the available games will be exclusively PC titles. Of the publishers already on board, many are offering up titles from past consoles. "It's like a MAME emulator, but legal," said a rep. Sega will provide all of its Sonic the Hedgehog games, as well as other titles from the Genesis and Saturn consoles. More modern titles will include the first iterations of the Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell and Tony Hawk's Pro Skater, while Pac-Man will lead the more retro part of the service's catalog.

In addition to games, GameTap will also feature original content, including animated segments from the creators of the Cartoon Network's Adult Swim showcase.

While seemingly new, the GameTap service is not the first of its kind. Sega offered a modem/cable service for the Genesis for a while, where users could play games via subscription. Ironically, Time Warner-owned AOL started out as Control Video, a company whose product was an online service called Gameline for the Atari 2600 in the early 1980s.

For more information on GameTap, visit its official Web site.

By Staff -- GameSpot.

More in Tux Machines

And now for some good news... How open source triumphed over Microsoft Office in Italy

Microsoft Office may have a global monopoly, but one Italian region rejected it flat out. But, why? In the stunningly beautiful Italian region of Umbria, you'll feel more at home running open source software, rather than the clunky and expensive Microsoft Office suite. Read more

Red Hat, Chilean government hold talks on open source initiative

The head of Chilean regulator Pedro Huichalaf agreed to pass information regarding the benefits of open source software to the ministerial committee for digital development Read more

IT teams are choosing open source - but not just for the cost savings

IT decision makers are increasingly turning to open source over proprietary software because they believe it offers them better business continuity and control Read more

Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes

Via James Bessen, we learn of how a patent trolling operation by StreamScale has resulted in an open source project completely shutting down, despite the fact that the patent in question (US Patent 8,683,296 for an "Accelerated erasure coding system and method") is almost certainly ineligible for patent protection as an abstract idea, following the Supreme Court's Alice ruling and plenty of prior art. Erasure codes are used regularly today in cloud computing data storage and are considered to be rather important. Not surprisingly, companies and lawyers are starting to pop out of the woodwork to claim patents on key pieces. I won't pretend to understand the fundamental details of erasure codes, but the link above provides all the details. It goes through the specific claims in the patents, breaking down what they actually say (basically an erasure code on a computer using SIMD instructions), and how that's clearly an abstract idea and thus not patent-eligible. Read more