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What Sucks About DEs, pt. II: Apple, MacOS X

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Mac

Last week's column was basically a rant about things that bothered me about Ubuntu's GNOME/Linux combination. Besides the usual 'I do not experience the problems you have, so you must be an anti-GNOME troll!' and of the course the ever-present 'How on earth can you complain about Free software!', it did what is was supposed to do: bring problems under developer's direct attention (for instance, Evolution's UI maintainer emailed me, asking for more clarification). Now it's Apple's turn. Here is a list of problems I find the most annoying about Apple's Mac/MacOS.

  1. The MacOS does not exactly feel fast. It seems as if every action just takes a fraction of a second longer on the Mac than it does on other operating systems-- as if the MacOS has a continual hangover. While the situation on the MacBook Pro Apple is loaning me has improved considerably, it's still not what I want out of my operating system. Other than that, this MacBook Pro has a dual-core 2.0Ghz processor and 2 gigabyte of RAM; so no wonder it feels faster than on other Macs I've tried.

  2. MacOS X is an inconsistent mess. Yes, it really is. Graphically, that is. OSX now has, what, 7 or 8 different themes, and as far as I'm concerned, that's 6 or 7 too many. Some people say Apple is experimenting with all these themes; that's fine, but please keep that reserved for testers, and not for people like me who do not like to spend 130 Euros every 18 months on a piece of software that is only getting more inconsistent instead of less. If you like graphical consistency, stick with BeOS/Zeta or GNOME.

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