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Nagios offers open source option for network monitoring

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Large IT shops using HP OpenView or BMC Patrol may now have an open source alternative. Nagios is a Linux-based host, service and network monitoring program that is starting to attract attention because of its quick configuration and easy maintenance.

Be wouldn't it be tough for IT managers sell higher-ups on the virtues on a open source monitoring tool? It might be worth the effort, said James Turnbull, author of Pro Nagio 2.0 Turnbull spoke recently with Assistant Editor MiMi Yeh about how Nagios is different from its counterparts in the commercial world and why IT shops should give it a chance.

What sets Nagios apart from other open source network monitoring tools like Big Brother, OpenNMS, OpenView and SysMon?

James Turnbull: I think there are three key reasons why Nagios is superior to many other products in this area -- ease of use, extensibility and community. Getting a Nagios server up and running generally only takes a few minutes. Nagios is also easily integrated and extended either by being able to receive data from other applications or sending data to reporting engines or other tools. Lastly, Nagios has excellent documentation backed up with a great community of users who are helpful, friendly and knowledgeable. All these factors make Nagios a good choice for enterprise management in small, medium and even large enterprises.

Why shouldn't you run Nagios as the root user?

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