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Reader's Questions to the Debian Project Leader

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Interviews

Last month Pro-Linux asked its readers to propose questions to ask the Debian Project Leader (DPL). Many readers took part and posted their questions to our forum. The topic was apparently interesting enough so that many comments, critical remarks, and questions were posted. From all proposals we chose ten questions for the Debian project. After DPL Anthony Towns, Steve McIntyre, one of his deputies, also volunteered to answer the questions. Therefore we got not only one answer for most of the questions, but two.

The Interview

Question: Some time ago Martin "Joey" Schulze abruptly retired from his position as the release manager of Debian stable. Did his criticism of the management of the Debian FTP masters, the very reason for his final retirement, have any visible effects on how Debian handles problems like these nowadays?

Anthony: Since the criticism was partly directed at me, I'll leave this one to Steve, as a more independent party.

Steve: In that particular case - stable release management - we have now established a team to keep the day-to-day work going. More generally, we are working on the communication problems that were the root cause of the problem. It may take a while for things to visibly change, but expect some progress.

Question: The DPL may largely be entangled in daily business to keep the project going, i.e. bureaucracy, politics and related issues. Do you have a personal dream or vision on what Debian should be like in a distant future?

Full Story.

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