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today's leftovers

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  • 5 steps to becoming a quality Docker contributor

    But getting started on a new codebase can be daunting. Docker has many, many lines of code. Fixing even the smallest issue can require reading through a lot of that code and understanding how the pieces all fit together.

  • LUCI4HPC

    The software described in this article is designed for a Beowulf-style cluster. Such a cluster commonly consists of consumer-grade machines and allows for parallel high-performance computing. The system is managed by a head node and accessed via a login node. The actual work is performed by multiple compute nodes. The individual nodes are connected through an internal network. The head and login node need an additional external network connection, while the compute nodes often use an additional high-throughput, low-latency connection between them, such as InfiniBand.

  • Linbit Launches New Synchronous Server Storage Software

    DRBD9 provides enterprise Linux users with synchronous server storage replication including support for native remote direct memory access, or RDMA, and OpenStack integration.

  • Linode introduces KVM to help it move away from Xen

    The upgrade to KVM is very easy to carry out, on a Xen Linode’s dashboard, there is a link on the right sidebar titled ‘Upgrade to KVM’. Once you do the upgrade you should then be switched over to KVM. If you want to set your account to default to KVM for new Linodes just go to your Account Settings and set the ‘Hypervisor Preference’ to KVM, any new Linodes you create will be KVM. On a 1GB instance, one user reported the downtime to be between 8-9 minutes while he switched to KVM.

  • Linux Foundation Beefs Up Scholarship Program

    The Linux Foundation Training Scholarship Program provides funds to applicants who otherwise would not have the ability to attend Linux Foundation training courses. It attempts to help developers, IT professionals, and promising students to build Linux careers and contribute to shaping the future of the operating system and the enterprise.

  • Linux Foundation Calls for Submissions for Expanded 2015 Linux Training Scholarship Program
  • 2015 Linux Training Scholarship Program is now Accepting Applications
  • Who's Afraid of Systemd?

    Last year, the free software community was full of debates about systemd, the system manager that replaces init, the process that boots a Linux system. Now that systemd is uneventfully running the latest releases of major distributions like Debian, Fedora, and Ubuntu, you might imagine that opposition to it is melting away -- but you'd be wrong.

    Instead, casual references on social media show that the rumors are as common as ever. And while you don't hear much recently about Devuan, the anti-systemd fork of Debian, it is still trudging towards a release while making the same arguments as ever.

    The situation is not unique. Some free software circles have always seemed to require an enemy. For instance, in the first decade of the millennium, it was Mono, an adaptation for Linux of Microsoft's .Net. Hundreds of thousands of words were written denouncing Mono, yet today it attracts no attention, although it is still available in repositories.

    Perhaps, too, free software users are becoming conservative as they age, as indicated by the user revolts against GNOME and KDE. Yet no precedent comes close to the viciousness of attacks on systemd, or had so little foundation, either.

  • Understanding Systemd
  • What will be the future of Linux without Linus?

    Linus: I’ve never been much of a visionary — instead of looking at huge plans for the future, I tend to have a rather short time frame of ‘issues in the next few months’. I’m a big believer in that the ‘details’ matter, and if you take care of the details, the big issues will end up sorting themselves out on their own.

  • [Reposted] The creator of Linux OS is calm about the future
  • If I get hit by a bus, Linux will go on just fine says Linus Torvalds

    Just a few days after asking the Linux community to let him take a break, Linus Torvalds has said the project he kicked off 1991 can now get along without him.

    He was, characteristically, blunt in his recent interview with Bloomberg, saying Linux would survive his death.

  • Another angle... Linux: a future without Torvalds [reposted in Ireland]
  • Will Linux survive the death of Linus Torvalds?
  • Linus Torvalds Says Linux Can Move On Without Him
  • Linux Top 3: Linux 4.1 delayed 1 Week, Kaos and Clonezilla Update

    Linux 4.1 is going to take a little longer than some of its predecessors, with Linus Torvalds release a rare eighth release candidate on June 14.

  • Examining the design patterns

    I wanted to share a brief update on the Outreachy project that Gina and I are working on, where Gina is preparing for a usability test in GNOME.

    So far, we've been in an "information gathering" mode, where she has been learning about some of the basics of usability testing. In our next step, Gina will now start doing an analysis in preparation for a usability test.

  • Plans for GNOME’s apps

    I’ve been a bit quiet about GNOME’s applications of late. This isn’t because nothing has been happening, though – quite the opposite. We’ve been steadily working away behind the scenes, and our application designs have evolved considerably.

  • Why I use Gentoo Linux (and if you develop software you should too)

    I first discovered Gentoo Linux when I left Oracle/Sun in 2010, gave up my Mac and decided to experiment with creating a mac-like desktop experience on Linux. The initial reason was the optimizations you can do to squeeze every bit of performance out of your hardware (I'd bought a cheap Lenovo laptop).

  • Ravello Empowers Open Source Community With Free Smart Labs on AWS and Google for Red Hat Certified Engineers
  • Rackspace's Carl Thompson Named 2015 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year
  • Red Hat (RHT) to Release Quarterly Earnings on Thursday
  • Rite Aid, Red Hat, Smith & Wesson earnings in focus
  • Red Hat Earnings Expected to Rise

    Optimism surrounds Red Hat, as it gets ready to report its first quarter results on Thursday, June 18, 2015. Analysts are expecting the company to book a profit of 27 cents a share, up from 24 cents a year ago.

  • Is Red Hat's (RHT) Q1 Earnings Likely to Surprise Estimates?

    Red Hat reported strong results in the last quarter with both earnings and revenues surpassing the respective Zacks Consensus Estimate.

  • Fedora 22 - workstation - Gnome - Do not disturb

    Fedora 22 comes with the newest version of Gnome - 3.16. You've probably heard about this already. The new version brought quite a few shiny changes, a major one of which was a brand new notification area. You don't have a notification bar at the bottom any more, your notifications now come up at the top with the calendar. It's really neat! More information can be found in the release notes here.

  • Testing rawhide apps using xdg-app

    An important aspect of xdg-app is application sandboxing, which will require application changes to use sandbox-specific APIs. However, xdg-app is also a good way to deploy and run non-sandboxed (or partially sandboxed) regular applications.

  • Contribute to pkgdb2

    Pkgdb2 is the application managing in Fedora, who is allowed to access which git repo containing the files necessary to build the packages present in the distribution.

  • IRC on Hubs

    Still, since the idea for hubs is also to help new contributors get integrated more smoothly into the Fedora community, an effective way to message people did seem like it would be valuable. Since the team/project hubs will have the ability to include an embedded IRC channel, using IRC to send private messages seemed logical. But Fedora Hubs is not an IRC client – it will use IRC to send private messages between users and to enable the channel discussions, but every channel must be directly associated with a hub and the messaging interface will only support messages between Hubs users, not to anyone external. This is an active design choice that Mo and I made, based on the concept of keeping the hub as the central organizing principle of this app in order to help fend off scope creep.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 Update Causes Problems, Canonical Apologizes for Issues and Promises Fixes

    It would appear that many users reported issues after upgrading their Ubuntu phones to the massive OTA-4 software update released by Canonical for their Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system, which is used in devices like BQ Aquaris E4.5.

  • Linux Mint 17.2 'Rafaela' RC now available

    Ubuntu is one of the best overall Linux distributions, but it does have its fair share of detractors. Many people dislike the direction Canonical takes sometimes, including the much-maligned Unity desktop environment. Truth be told, I rather like Unity, but I can understand why some people prefer different desktop environments.

  • Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela available for download
  • Finally, an official Raspberry Pi case has been released!

    Rejoice Pi fans! The team behind Raspberry Pi have announced an official case for the Pi 2 Model B and the Pi Model B+. The case was announced today on their blog and is available from all the main Pi retailers for a cheap £6 (which works out to about $9).

  • Raspberry Pi Open Source Wireless Speakers Hit Kickstarter (video)

    Axiom Audio has this week unveiled a new range of wireless speakers they have added to their existing range that are powered by the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC.

  • Tuesday's security advisories
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • US Navy Soliciting Zero Days

    The National Security Agency may find and purchase zero days, but that doesn’t mean it’s sharing its hoard with other government agencies such as the U.S. Navy, which apparently is in the market for some unpatched, undisclosed vulnerabilities of its own.

    A request for proposal posted last Wednesday—which has since been taken down—to FedBizOpps.gov was a solicitation by the Naval Supply Systems Command seeking a CMMI-3 (Capability Maturity Model Integration) contractor capable of producing operational exploits that integrate with commonly used exploitation frameworks, the RFP said.

  • Your data is at risk if you are running iOS or Mac OS X

    Six university researchers from Indiana University have revealed that Apple’s password manager, Keychain, is susceptible to hackers. If exploited, the flaw would give a hacker access to the users passwords. The really worrying thing here is that Apple has known about the issue for months and still hasn’t managed to issue a fix.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • How to Filter Data in Django? – Linux Hint

    It is a very common requirement for the web application to display data on the web page based on the user’s interest. The searching feature of the application makes it more user-friendly. Django framework has a built-in filter() method to filter data from the database tables. A table can contain many records and sometimes determining some specific data are required based on the particular criteria. This task becomes easier by using the filter() method in different ways. How the data from a database table can be filtered using the filter method in four different ways will be discussed in this tutorial.

  • How to Create Django Templates? – Linux Hint

    A template contains HTML data that is generated from a view and displayed in the browser. The static and dynamic HTML pages can be created using the template. Logic and design have been kept separately in the Django application. Python code can’t be used directly in the Django template because the browser can’t interpret the python code. The designer can design the HTML pages only with the necessary format or styling, and the coder adds the static or dynamic data into the template using Django Template Language (DTL). How the Django template can be created and how the DTL can be used to add static or dynamic content to the template have been shown in this tutorial.

  • How to Create Django Form? – Linux Hint

    The use of the form is an essential part of any web application. The input from the website users can be taken using the form. It can contain different types of fields, such as text box, combo box, check box, radio button, etc. to take data from the users. Django framework contains a large number of libraries to help the web developer to design an HTML form for taking input from the user, process the input, and respond to the user’s input. How HTML form can be used to take data from the user, read the input values, and print the values in the browser using Django is shown in this tutorial.

  • How to Get Started with Pandas in Python – a Beginner's Guide

    The Pandas package in Python gives you a bunch of cool functions and features that help you manipulate data more efficiently. It also lets you perform numerous data cleaning and data preprocessing steps with very little hassle. That's great isn't it? Here's a list of some of the most frequently used Pandas functions and tricks to help you enjoy your data science journey.

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • How to Create an ISO from Current Installation in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    In Ubuntu, most programs and operating systems can be installed through the ISO file. The ISO file format is a live identical image of the specific operating environment that contains all required installation files. Another name used for ISO files is a disc image. So, an ISO file is a perfect duplicate of the content of an optical disc, such as DVD and CD images. An ISO file is a package that consists of installation directories in an ISO format. Users can create a backup of their current installation in an ISO file format. The ISO file can also be used as an external drive, or you can make a bootable USB. if you have an ISO file, then you can create the installation disc by burning the image to a CD or USB. This article shows you how to create an ISO file from a currently installed Ubuntu 20.04 system. You can create an ISO file from the current installation of Ubuntu 20.04 using any of the following methods.

  • How to Install Security Updates in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    An essential part of using any operating system is to check for security updates from time to time. It can be difficult to keep track of security updates all the time. One of the easiest ways to keep your Ubuntu system secure is by upgrading your software packages. New versions add the latest features available, and system security is increased by updating programs frequently. This guide shows you how to install security updates in Ubuntu 20.04, which will be performed by upgrading security packages.

  • How To Use the C Programming Language in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    C is an excellent procedural programming language for beginners who want to learn how to program. Many applications, including databases and operating systems, use this general-purpose programming language for development. The C language is popular among new learners because it is not only easy to use but also helps programmers to better understand the internal architecture of the computer. C is the first step into the programming world, and after learning the C programming language, it will not be as difficult to learn other programming languages. Moreover, the C language is portable, as programs written in this language can be transferred to various platforms without requiring any changes to the code. This article shows you how to use the C programming language in Ubuntu 20.04 (LTS) and 20.10.

  • What is build-essential Ubuntu, how to install and use it? – Linux Hint

    The build-essentials packages are meta-packages that are necessary for compiling software. They include the GNU debugger, g++/GNU compiler collection, and some more tools and libraries that are required to compile a program. For example, if you need to work on a C/C++ compiler, you need to install essential meta-packages on your system before starting the C compiler installation. When installing the build-essential packages, some other packages such as G++, dpkg-dev, GCC and make, etc. also install on your system. Above, we have described what the build-essential packages are. In the rest of the article, we will explain how to install and use build-essentials on Ubuntu systems. All terminal commands we have executed on Ubuntu 20.04 system in this article. Let’s dive into the depths!

  • Learning Dart & Flutter

    My employer, Canonical - recently announced we’re working with the Flutter developers to bring their platform to the Linux desktop. My interest was piqued. Personally I like the concept of writing applications which can run on many platforms. I sometimes dabble with game development engines like Construct3, GDevelop, Unity & Godot which all have multiple export options for different platforms. Having similarly powerful, cross-platform and open source tools for building mobile and desktop (non-game) applications is welcome in my book.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 673

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 673 for the week of February 28 – March 6, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

Best Hex Editors for Linux

This article will list useful hex editor applications available for Linux. Hex editors allow you to modify pre-compiled binary files whose source code is typically not available to change. They work by browsing binary data present in a file and then presenting the data in hexadecimal notation to users. Hex editors can also show partial or full ASCII data depending on the contents of the file. These hex editors allow you to change hexadecimal values, thereby allowing users to modify file behavior even if they don’t have access to source code. However, the data represented by a hex editor is not exactly human readable. Reading and interpreting hexadecimal values to infer program logic and behavior is not an easy task by any means and it takes considerable efforts to find values and make even the smallest of change. A hex editor is one of the first tools used while reverse engineering a file. Read more

LibreOffice Online with Team Editing Collaboration

Continuing the intro, now we will try LibreOffice Online with team collaboration. This allows you and friends (a team) altogether to edit a document simultaneously via the internet. It supports computer, laptop, as well as Android device users. How to do that? This simple tutorial explains it step by step for you. [...] Once a friend clicked the link, he/she will open your document on the web browser, asked for a name, asked for the password if any, and finally can edit the document together with you at the same time. The name asked will be used as identifier when a team working together. Read more