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today's leftovers

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  • Voice of the Masses: Which company does the most for Linux?

    While part-time hobbyists do plenty of great work on GNU/Linux, most of the code thesedays comes from paid developers. So for our upcoming podcast, we want your opinions: which company does the most for Linux? You might argue that Red Hat or SUSE contribute the most with their patches and efforts to get Linux into enterprises, or you may say that Intel or Canonical are doing the best work.

  • Windows versus Linux for businesses
  • Starting Your IT Career With Linux (A Slide Show)

    Interested in starting a new career in IT? Linux is one of the hottest technologies in the market today, with tens of thousands of job openings, and salaries outpacing many other IT specialties. This presentation demonstrates the steps you should take to launch your career in Linux.

  • Linux Foundation Funds Internet Security Advances

    The Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative has selected three security-oriented projects to receive a total of $500,000 in funding.

  • Linux 4.1 Goes Long Term for Support

    Linux 4.1 was officially released by Linus Torvalds on June 21, marking the first major update to the Linux 4.0 kernel which first debuted in April.

  • Kubuntu Wily Alpha 1
  • KDEPIM report

    We are in good way to have a stable version for 15.08.

  • KDE Plasma 5.3.1 testing

    After several month of packaging in kde overlay and almost a month in tree, we have lifted the mask for KDE Plasma 5.3.1 today. If you want to test it out, some infos how to get it.

  • Calligra's Kexi 3.0, a Microsoft Access Alternative for Linux, to Use KDE Frameworks 5

    Jaroslaw Staniek, one of the developers of the Kexi open-source database creation tool distributed as part of the Calligra office suite for the acclaimed KDE desktop environment, has unveiled details about the development progress of Kexi 3.0.

  • more menus

    Since last blog post I have been designing and implementing a room menu for Polari.

  • GNOME 3.17.3 Has Been Officially Released

    Frederic Peters has just informed us about the immediate availability of the third snapshot for the upcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.

  • GNOME 3.17.3 Released
  • Notes: future plans

    This is the second in a series of posts about recent design work for GNOME’s core applications. As I said in my previous post, the designs for many of these applications have evolved considerably, and we have major plans for them. Help is needed if these plans are going to become a reality though, so we are looking for contributors to get involved.

  • Tumbleweed — what’s the holdup

    It has been around 10 days since the last update to opensuse Tumbleweed. That would have been snapshot 20150612. This is a brief note to explain the delays.

  • Valve Announces SteamOS 2.0 Preview Release Based on Debian 8.1 Jessie

    On June 25, Valve was more than happy to announce the immediate availability for download and testing of the first preview release of the next major version of its SteamOS Linux distribution, dubbed Brewmaster.

  • Ubuntu Family Does Their 15.10 Alpha 1 Releases
  • Canonical banks on Ubuntu’s exclusivity for success

    Over the last few years, there have been several releases of mobile phones designed with open-source operating systems: Mozilla, Canonical, Samsung, and Jolla to name a few companies that have ventured into that industry. Their operating systems aim to break through the global dominance of Android and iOS — although Android has been their biggest challenge as phones based on it are the most popular in countries in which those companies have targeted customers. But none of these companies has been successful on a large scale; they have seen success with niche groups of customers, but nothing that can make a dent in Android’s global presence. Still, they haven’t thrown in the towel, and in some cases, have done quite the opposite.

  • Meizu MX4 open-source smartphone running Ubuntu Touch reaches Europe: Available to buy via invites
  • The best Ubuntu phone has the most convoluted purchasing scheme

    After months of anticipation, the high-end Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition smartphone is going on sale—sort of.

  • Meizu’s MX4 sheds its Android skin for Ubuntu on June 25

    The MX4 Ubuntu Edition will be available in Europe starting tomorrow, Canonical announced on the Ubuntu Insights blog, but will only be available to those who obtain an invite through an “interactive origami wall” on the Meizu website. The origami wall will be “filled with fun and interesting glimpses” of the latest Ubuntu phone, alongside the occasional randomly-generated invite.

  • Jonathan Riddell Steps Down From The Kubuntu Council
  • Joint Statement from the CC and KC
  • The Ubuntu MATE Boutique Is Now Open for Business

    Today, June 24, the Ubuntu MATE team had the great pleasure of announcing that the Ubuntu MATE Boutique is now open for business and will offer you all sorts of interesting products.

  • Sierra Wireless Releases New Embedded Module Powered by Linux

    The Internet of Things is big marketplace and we keep hearing about companies like Intel, Dell, and Canonical who are trying to make some headway, but there are other competitors out there that are working just as hard and who are also using Linux as backbone, like Sierra Wireless for example.

  • Spire Payments’ Linux POS range certified to support Compass Plus TranzWare system

    Spire Payments’ new suite of Linux-based POS terminals (the SP range) continues to gain global acceptance by achieving Compass Plus approval for TranzWare system.

  • Arrow Electronics Introduces Open Source Board with New Freescale i.MX 7 Microprocessor

    Arrow Electronics, Inc. (NYSE:ARW) today announced at the Freescale Technology Forum that it is now offering an open-source, specification-compliant board that is based on the new Freescale i.MX 7 microprocessor. Arrow also collaborated with Qualcomm Atheros Inc., a subsidiary of Qualcomm Incorporated, on the board’s Bluetooth & Wi-Fi capabilities and with Linear Technologies on the board’s power supply.

  • Google removes "always listening" code from Chromium

    After including closed-source code that enabled Chromium to listen in to a computer's microphone, Google bowed to backlash and removed it from the open-source browser.

  • BMW: ‘Our competitor is not Audi, Jaguar Land Rover or Mercedes but consumer electronics players’

    BMW is bringing software back in-house so it can deliver seamless digital experiences for its customers - something more valued than horsepower or engines in today's market, its digital business models lead said.

  • 10 Reasons Tape Backup Remains Important to the Enterprise

    Digital tape is about the hardest-to-kill storage IT there is, unless you count carving out data onto rocks, the way it was done hundreds of thousands of years ago. Tape technology celebrated its 63rd birthday on May 21; IBM first made available its IBM 726 Magnetic tape reader/recorder in 1952. Strangely, unlike later IBM tape drives, the original 726 could read tape backward and forward. Tape has managed to get better with age. When tape first went to market, the media itself weighed 935 pounds and held 2.3MB of data. In 2015, that much tape weighs closer to 12 pounds, and 2.3MB would comprise one large photo or a short pop song. Tape storage densities are broken regularly; IBM's tape team recently demonstrated an areal recording density of 123 billion bits of uncompressed data per square inch on low-cost, particulate magnetic tape. The breakthrough represents the equivalent of a 220TB tape cartridge that could fit in the palm of your hand. Companies such as Iron Mountain, Spectra Logic, IBM and others maintain large installed bases of tape storage around the world. Here are some key facts about tape storage.

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Thursday's security updates
  • DOST 2015: Ceph Security Presentation

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • How to Filter Data in Django? – Linux Hint

    It is a very common requirement for the web application to display data on the web page based on the user’s interest. The searching feature of the application makes it more user-friendly. Django framework has a built-in filter() method to filter data from the database tables. A table can contain many records and sometimes determining some specific data are required based on the particular criteria. This task becomes easier by using the filter() method in different ways. How the data from a database table can be filtered using the filter method in four different ways will be discussed in this tutorial.

  • How to Create Django Templates? – Linux Hint

    A template contains HTML data that is generated from a view and displayed in the browser. The static and dynamic HTML pages can be created using the template. Logic and design have been kept separately in the Django application. Python code can’t be used directly in the Django template because the browser can’t interpret the python code. The designer can design the HTML pages only with the necessary format or styling, and the coder adds the static or dynamic data into the template using Django Template Language (DTL). How the Django template can be created and how the DTL can be used to add static or dynamic content to the template have been shown in this tutorial.

  • How to Create Django Form? – Linux Hint

    The use of the form is an essential part of any web application. The input from the website users can be taken using the form. It can contain different types of fields, such as text box, combo box, check box, radio button, etc. to take data from the users. Django framework contains a large number of libraries to help the web developer to design an HTML form for taking input from the user, process the input, and respond to the user’s input. How HTML form can be used to take data from the user, read the input values, and print the values in the browser using Django is shown in this tutorial.

  • How to Get Started with Pandas in Python – a Beginner's Guide

    The Pandas package in Python gives you a bunch of cool functions and features that help you manipulate data more efficiently. It also lets you perform numerous data cleaning and data preprocessing steps with very little hassle. That's great isn't it? Here's a list of some of the most frequently used Pandas functions and tricks to help you enjoy your data science journey.

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • How to Create an ISO from Current Installation in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    In Ubuntu, most programs and operating systems can be installed through the ISO file. The ISO file format is a live identical image of the specific operating environment that contains all required installation files. Another name used for ISO files is a disc image. So, an ISO file is a perfect duplicate of the content of an optical disc, such as DVD and CD images. An ISO file is a package that consists of installation directories in an ISO format. Users can create a backup of their current installation in an ISO file format. The ISO file can also be used as an external drive, or you can make a bootable USB. if you have an ISO file, then you can create the installation disc by burning the image to a CD or USB. This article shows you how to create an ISO file from a currently installed Ubuntu 20.04 system. You can create an ISO file from the current installation of Ubuntu 20.04 using any of the following methods.

  • How to Install Security Updates in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    An essential part of using any operating system is to check for security updates from time to time. It can be difficult to keep track of security updates all the time. One of the easiest ways to keep your Ubuntu system secure is by upgrading your software packages. New versions add the latest features available, and system security is increased by updating programs frequently. This guide shows you how to install security updates in Ubuntu 20.04, which will be performed by upgrading security packages.

  • How To Use the C Programming Language in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    C is an excellent procedural programming language for beginners who want to learn how to program. Many applications, including databases and operating systems, use this general-purpose programming language for development. The C language is popular among new learners because it is not only easy to use but also helps programmers to better understand the internal architecture of the computer. C is the first step into the programming world, and after learning the C programming language, it will not be as difficult to learn other programming languages. Moreover, the C language is portable, as programs written in this language can be transferred to various platforms without requiring any changes to the code. This article shows you how to use the C programming language in Ubuntu 20.04 (LTS) and 20.10.

  • What is build-essential Ubuntu, how to install and use it? – Linux Hint

    The build-essentials packages are meta-packages that are necessary for compiling software. They include the GNU debugger, g++/GNU compiler collection, and some more tools and libraries that are required to compile a program. For example, if you need to work on a C/C++ compiler, you need to install essential meta-packages on your system before starting the C compiler installation. When installing the build-essential packages, some other packages such as G++, dpkg-dev, GCC and make, etc. also install on your system. Above, we have described what the build-essential packages are. In the rest of the article, we will explain how to install and use build-essentials on Ubuntu systems. All terminal commands we have executed on Ubuntu 20.04 system in this article. Let’s dive into the depths!

  • Learning Dart & Flutter

    My employer, Canonical - recently announced we’re working with the Flutter developers to bring their platform to the Linux desktop. My interest was piqued. Personally I like the concept of writing applications which can run on many platforms. I sometimes dabble with game development engines like Construct3, GDevelop, Unity & Godot which all have multiple export options for different platforms. Having similarly powerful, cross-platform and open source tools for building mobile and desktop (non-game) applications is welcome in my book.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 673

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 673 for the week of February 28 – March 6, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

Best Hex Editors for Linux

This article will list useful hex editor applications available for Linux. Hex editors allow you to modify pre-compiled binary files whose source code is typically not available to change. They work by browsing binary data present in a file and then presenting the data in hexadecimal notation to users. Hex editors can also show partial or full ASCII data depending on the contents of the file. These hex editors allow you to change hexadecimal values, thereby allowing users to modify file behavior even if they don’t have access to source code. However, the data represented by a hex editor is not exactly human readable. Reading and interpreting hexadecimal values to infer program logic and behavior is not an easy task by any means and it takes considerable efforts to find values and make even the smallest of change. A hex editor is one of the first tools used while reverse engineering a file. Read more

LibreOffice Online with Team Editing Collaboration

Continuing the intro, now we will try LibreOffice Online with team collaboration. This allows you and friends (a team) altogether to edit a document simultaneously via the internet. It supports computer, laptop, as well as Android device users. How to do that? This simple tutorial explains it step by step for you. [...] Once a friend clicked the link, he/she will open your document on the web browser, asked for a name, asked for the password if any, and finally can edit the document together with you at the same time. The name asked will be used as identifier when a team working together. Read more