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DreamLinux you must try...

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Just talk

As mentioned I have only been researching Linux for about 30 days, so I consider myself an amature at understanding all the inner-workings of Linux. What I do know is that I have been looking for a way to play with Linux to grow my knowledgebase of "all things IT", which include OS research, Web2.0, Internet Marketing and outsourcing IT resources.

My journey began with a trip to DistroWatch, where I was first introduced to Puppy, then to PCLinuxOS, both are LiveCDs and have great documentation and tutorials, a great to way to bring newbies up to speed with all the Linux lingo and howtos. I enjoyed both these distros very much, although Puppy felt a little under polished, and PCLOS, well ran a bit too slow from the CD-ROM, although I am sure if I had been brave enough to install it on my HD the performance would be great.

I then moved on to Knoppix, (first try was bad, tried the german version, had to learn the german keys to get it to boot properly), then I tried Vector, (it did not like my hardware and would only get to the pretty vector boot screen and nothing futher). Then I tried SLAX, a great distro that I thought would be the one, no issues with boot up, very light weight, no problems, many options, great documentation, and a great community following. Me just being courious I continued my search and found dyne:bolic, this one is super cool, light weight based of Knoppix, Debian, many programs for audio editing. Not too much as far as community buzz, documentation is pretty good, needs a forum.

Then I stumbled across DreamLinux....This Distro is HOT HOT HOT...the best boot screen, tons of editing and developing tools and very very very fast from the CD, documentation is OK although it is a Brazilian distro therefore some things are only in Portugese. It has a very polished feel, ready to compete with the big guns, can be boxed and placed on the shelf immediately, it has a very Mac feel, which makes it look even more polished....Bottom line you must try this distro.

Well that's it for my first entry, please feel free to make comments....

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I checked it out a little while back as well, and I agree it's a real nice distro.

You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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