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OpenLogic Launches OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0

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First to reduce Open Source risks in enterprises by providing comprehensive control and tracking of more than 160 certified open source solutions

BROOMFIELD, Colo. June 26, 2006 –OpenLogic, Inc., a leading provider of software, stacks and support that enable enterprises to easily deploy and manage customized open source environments, today announced the launch of OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0, the first enterprise-wide solution providing a platform that empowers enterprises to manage, deploy, track and maintain a broad library of open source solutions.

Enterprise Control and Tracking of Open Source Software
OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0, formerly known as BlueGlue, uses a new distributed enterprise architecture, which allows enterprises to control the use of open source across the enterprise. OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0 gives enterprises a central repository of approved, certified open source products within the corporate firewall; enables companies to automatically install, configure and integrate this software on remote servers and desktops (using existing
software deployment tools if they choose) and provides an audit trail of open source software deployment.

As with past versions, OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0 allows enterprises to control which open source products are included in the approved library, and can limit usage on various criteria including license type.

More Certified Open Source Products
OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0 includes 18 new OpenLogic certified open source products including Geronimo, Apache Axis, POI and JLDAP. This brings OpenLogic’s library to more than 160 pre-certified open source software packages, including the most popular open source databases, applications servers, IDEs and more. OpenLogic’s platform is flexible and extensible, enabling companies to build customized stacks by adding their own open source products, as well as commercial and proprietary software.

Side-by-side Version Installation
OpenLogic has added a side-by-side install capability, to allow users to install multiple versions of the same open source product on the same computer. This can help users to compare versions of open source packages and manage migrations to new releases.

Ongoing Open Source Maintenance through Certified Updates
With OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0, OpenLogic expands its OpenUpdate maintenance capabilities to allow frequent, incremental updates to an enterprise’s certified open source library. OpenLogic evaluates and certifies patches and new software releases for its entire library of open source solutions and provides one-click access through OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0. Unlike fixed stack providers, the OpenLogic Enterprise technology enables customers to go beyond a limited, standard stack by configuring custom stacks that mix certified open source with commercial and proprietary application.

Consolidated Open Source Enterprise Support/OpenLogic Expert Community
OpenLogic offers enterprise support for more than 160 certified open source products - providing a single point of contact for enterprise open source issues. OpenLogic handles tier 1 and tier 2 support, while tapping the open source development community through the OpenLogic Expert Community for help in resolving more complex issues. OpenLogic shepherds enterprise issues through the entire process to resolution, providing enterprises with the commercial-grade service levels they require.

“Even though many of our largest enterprise customers have continued to increase their use of open source software, they have also been telling us that controlling the use of hundreds of open source solutions is a time and labor intensive process,” said Steven Grandchamp, CEO of OpenLogic. “We have created OpenLogic Enterprise 4.0 to address many of the challenges unique to managing open source solutions.”

About OpenLogic
OpenLogic is a leading provider of software, stacks and support that enable enterprises to easily customize, deploy and manage commercial-grade open source environments. OpenLogic’s software automates the integration and deployment of any combination of over 160 pre-certified open source packages along with proprietary or commercial solutions. The OpenLogic solution also mitigates open source legal risks by enabling companies to manage and enforce open source policies. OpenLogic’s technical support and update services give enterprises the commercial-grade reliability they demand. OpenLogic is currently used by 700 customers worldwide. For more on OpenLogic, go to www.openlogic.com.

Contacts:

Bret Clement
Page One PR
303.462.3057
bret@pageonepr.com

Craig Oda
Page One PR
650.565.9800 x 102
craig@pageonepr.com

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