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Red Hat CEO Bemoans State Of Education, Tech Talent Pool

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It seems that Bill Gates isn't the only high-tech executive concerned about the state of education.

Red Hat Chairman, CEO and President Matthew Szulik said his ability to find well-qualified candidates in the United States who also embrace the open-source movement's entrepreneurial values and culture of innovation is extremely limited. Of the 500 people Red Hat hired last year, more than two-thirds came from abroad, he said.

"My business problem is not marketing or competing externally. My biggest problem is recruiting," Szulik said Tuesday in a keynote speech about open source and innovation at the C3 Expo in New York.

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Listing and loading of Debian repositories: now live on Software Heritage
    Software Heritage is the project for which I’ve been working during the past two and a half years now. The grand vision of the project is to build the universal software archive, which will collect, preserve and share the Software Commons. Today, we’ve announced that Software Heritage is archiving the contents of Debian daily. I’m reposting this article on my blog as it will probably be of interest to readers of Planet Debian. TL;DR: Software Heritage now archives all source packages of Debian as well as its security archive daily. Everything is ready for archival of other Debian derivatives as well. Keep on reading to get details of the work that made this possible.
  • Canonical announces Ubuntu Core across Rigado’s IoT gateways
  • Collecting user data while protecting user privacy
    Lots of companies want to collect data about their users. This is a good thing, generally; being data-driven is important, and it’s jolly hard to know where best to focus your efforts if you don’t know what your people are like. However, this sort of data collection also gives people a sense of disquiet; what are you going to do with that data about me? How do I get you to stop using it? What conclusions are you drawing from it? I’ve spoken about this sense of disquiet in the past, and you can watch (or read) that talk for a lot more detail about how and why people don’t like it. So, what can we do about it? As I said, being data-driven is a good thing, and you can’t be data-driven if you haven’t got any data to be driven by. How do we enable people to collect data about you without compromising your privacy? Well, there are some ways. Before I dive into them, though, a couple of brief asides: there are some people who believe that you shouldn’t be allowed to collect any data on your users whatsoever; that the mere act of wanting to do so is in itself a compromise of privacy. This is not addressed to those people. What I want is a way that both sides can get what they want: companies and projects can be data-driven, and users don’t get their privacy compromised. If what you want is that companies are banned from collecting anything… this is not for you. Most people are basically OK with the idea of data collection, they just don’t want to be victimised by it, now or in the future, and it’s that property that we want to protect. Similarly, if you’re a company who wants to know everything about each individual one of your users so you can sell that data for money, or exploit it on a user-by-user basis, this isn’t for you either. Stop doing that.