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DebConf15, LibreOffice 5, and Linux Rules Web

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Today in Linux news, the Debian Project today announced DebConf15, "the largest DebConf so far." This sixteenth Debian conference will take place for the first time in Germany, so folks are excited about that. Elsewhere, Netcraft posted that Linux continues to be the most used OS to run the top Websites around the Globe and the Hectic Geek reviewed the recently released Korora 22 saying it "works right out of the box."

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Python Programming

  • Introduction to Python SQL Libraries

    All software applications interact with data, most commonly through a database management system (DBMS). Some programming languages come with modules that you can use to interact with a DBMS, while others require the use of third-party packages. In this tutorial, you’ll explore the different Python SQL libraries that you can use. You’ll develop a straightforward application to interact with SQLite, MySQL, and PostgreSQL databases.

  • Introduction to Image Processing in Python with OpenCV

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how we can perform image processing using the Python language. We are not going to restrict ourselves to a single library or framework; however, there is one that we will be using the most frequently, the Open CV library. We will start off by talking a little about image processing and then we will move on to see different applications/scenarios where image processing can come in handy. So, let's begin!

  • Talking to API's and goodlooking tools

    One of my go-to locations for security news had a thread recently about a tool called VTScan. I really liked the idea of not having to go through the browser overhead to check files against multiple scan engines. Although the tool (which is itself a basic vt-cli spinoff) already existed, I was looking for a new challenge, I decided to roll my own and add a few cool features! I'll have a thorough look at how python talks to API's with requests and I look at turning all this API data into a nice GUI application with click. I hope to give you some idea's for CLI styling in the future so I can see more awesome tools by you all!

  • From a rejected Pycon talk to a new project.

    Like many others, my talk proposal (early draft here) for Pycon US was rejected. So, I decided to spend some time putting everything in a new project instead. (Documentation here.) It is still a rough draft, but usable ... and since I've mentioned it in a few other places, I thought I should mention it here as well.

Games: Humble Store, Bully: Scholarship and DOSBox

  • Humble Store has a 'Tabletop Sale' going, some good Linux games on offer

    It's the start of another glorious week for Linux gaming and another big sale is going on again. Over on the Humble Store, they have a Tabletop Sale now live.

  • How to play Bully: Scholarship Edition on Linux

    Bully: Scholarship Edition is a remaster of Rockstar Game’s “Bully,” a game about a young kid working his way through the social hierarchy of high school, meeting girls, making friends, and causing mischief. The game is an open world, which is typical of Rockstar. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux PC.

  • DOSBox – Run classic DOS games on your Linux PC

    DOSBox is an open-source software that creates a virtual MS-DOS compatible environment, including sound, graphics, and basic networking. It enables you to run DOS applications without any modifications. Using this wonderful app, you can run your classic DOS games and compilers like Wolfenstein 3D, Prince of Persia, Turbo C++, and MASM on your Linux PC. DOSBox makes use of Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL), a library designed to allow low-level access to hardware components like a mouse, keyboards, sound system, and graphics. It has made the whole process of porting easier to various platforms. Currently, DOSBox runs on several platforms like different Linux, Windows, and macOS.

The CLA Denial-Of-Service attack

Obviously, there's a flaw in that logic. A CLA is an agreement between a project and a (new) contributor. A project does not absolutely requires the contributor to sign the agreement to accept its contributions, in theory. It's the reverse: for the contributor to have their patch accepted, they need to accept the CLA. But the project could accept contributions without CLA without violating the law. But it seems that projects sometimes end up doing a DOS on themselves by refusing perfectly fine contributions from drive-by contributors who don't have time to waste filling forms on all projects they stumble upon. In the case of this typo, I could have submitted a patch, but because I didn't sign a CLA, again, the project couldn't have merged it without breaking their own rules, even if someone else submits the same patch, after agreeing to the CLA. So, in effect, I would have DOS'd the project by providing the patch, so I just opened an issue which strangely — and hopefully — isn't covered by the CLA. Read more

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