Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Jaspersoft Launches JasperIntelligence 1.0

Filed under
OS

Open source business intelligence architecture strengthened with new analysis product and enhanced server capabilities

SAN FRANCISCO —June 28, 2006—JasperSoft Corporation, the leader in open source business intelligence, today announced the general availability of JasperIntelligence 1.0. New in JasperIntelligence, JasperAnalysis brings people in small and mid-size organizations open source Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) capability, enabling easy to use analysis of data. With this release of JasperIntelligence, JasperSoft is announcing major new versions of the full line of JasperSoft open source products, including JasperReports, iReport, JasperServer, and JasperAnalysis.

JasperAnalysis, new in JasperIntelligence 1.0, gives users the ability to analyze large datasets in real-time. With an easy-to-use graphical interface, business users can easily organize information along different axes to identify trends, anomalies, and correlations within the data. For example, sales information for a multi-location component manufacturer can be organized by year, product, and region to find out what components to order for different sites. Advanced reports can be easily created in JasperIntelligence and viewed as HTML, PDF, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Word documents, or other output formats.

“When we announced the JasperIntelligence architecture in April, we promised to bring BI to everyone. Thanks to the speed and efficiencies of open source development, we have reached a major milestone toward that goal with the launch of JasperIntelligence 1.0,” said Paul Doscher, CEO of JasperSoft.
JasperAnalysis is designed to make BI accessible to all employees in an organization. Accountants, executives, and operational managers can now easily access BI analysis tools that were previously available only to upper management. Unlike traditional BI analysis products, JasperAnalysis can be seamlessly integrated into new and existing applications.

Additional JasperAnalysis features include:

· Dynamic drill, pivot, filter, and charting;
· Easy-to-use web interface for end-users;
· High-performance relational OLAP engine;
· Maps onto existing relational data sources without requiring data movement; and
· MDX and XML/A compliant.

JasperServer has also been updated in the new version of JasperIntelligence. New JasperServer features include:

· New object-level security in JasperServer that provides fine-grained access control on a per- report and object basis;
· More complete web services API;
· Scheduling;
· Report distribution.

A new release of JasperReports and iReport is also now available. The latest release includes a plug-in for JasperServer and usability improvements.

“JasperSoft is fully committed to the open source community behind iReport, JasperAnalysis, JasperReports, and JasperServer,” said Doscher. “We’re continuously working with the open source community on feature enhancements and quality improvements to make the best open source BI products available to everyone.”

Led by the popularity of JasperReports, JasperIntelligence popularity has grown to more than 1 million downloads, 10,000 deployments, and 3,000 paying customers. Earlier this month, JasperReports for SugarCRM was named Editor’s Pick and SugarForge Project of the Month for June, having been downloaded more than 15,000 times from the SugarForge site since it was first released in March.

Availability
JasperSoft products are freely available as open source and can be downloaded at http://www.jaspersoft.com. Commercial licenses for JasperSoft products are available. The company also provides a complete set of support and services options for any size organization.

About JasperSoft
JasperSoft is the leader in open source business intelligence (BI). With more than one million downloads and 10,000 corporate deployments in 200 countries, JasperSoft offers the most widely used open source BI software in the world. The company’s JasperIntelligence architecture is comprised of open source server, report design, analytics, and commercial software for scalable enterprise applications. JasperSoft is based in San Francisco and is backed by leading venture capital firms Morgenthaler Ventures, Doll Capital Management, Discovery Ventures, and Partech International. More information is available at http://www.jaspersoft.com.
# # #

For media inquiries, please contact:
Craig Oda
Page One PR (for JasperSoft)
coda@pageonepr.com
650-565-9800 x102

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • One-stop counterfeit certificate shops for all your malware-signing needs

    The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program almost a decade ago was a watershed piece of malware for a variety of reasons. Chief among them, its use of cryptographic certificates belonging to legitimate companies to falsely vouch for the trustworthiness of the malware. Last year, we learned that fraudulently signed malware was more widespread than previously believed. On Thursday, researchers unveiled one possible reason: underground services that since 2011 have sold counterfeit signing credentials that are unique to each buyer.

  • How did OurMine hackers use DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks? [Ed: False. They did not attack Wikileaks; they attacked the DNS servers/framework. The corporate media misreported this at the time.
    The OurMine hacking group recently used DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks and take over its web address. Learn how this attack was performed from expert Nick Lewis.
  • Intel didn't give government advance notice on chip flaws

    Google researchers informed Intel of flaws in its chips in June. The company explained in its own letter to lawmakers that it left up to Intel informing the government of the flaws.

    Intel said that it did not notify the government at the time because it had “no indication of any exploitation by malicious actors,” and wanted to keep knowledge of the breach limited while it and other companies worked to patch the issue.

    The company let some Chinese technology companies know about the vulnerabilities, which government officials fear may mean the information was passed along to the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

  • Intel hid CPU bugs info from govt 'until public disclosure'

    As iTWire reported recently, Intel faces a total of 33 lawsuits over the two flaws. Additionally, the Boston law firm of Block & Leviton is preparing a class action lawsuit against Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich for allegedly selling a vast majority of his Intel stock after the company was notified of the two security flaws and before they became public.

  • Intel did not tell U.S. cyber officials about chip flaws until made public [iophk: "yeah right"]

    Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel said it did not think the flaws needed to be shared with U.S. authorities as hackers [sic] had not exploited the vulnerabilities.

  • LA Times serving cryptocurrency mining script [iophk: "JS"]

    The S3 bucket used by the LA Times is apparently world-writable and an ethical hacker [sic] appears to have left a warning in the repository, warning of possible misuse and asking the owner to secure the bucket.

  • Facebook's Mandatory Malware Scan Is an Intrusive Mess

    When an Oregon science fiction writer named Charity tried to log onto Facebook on February 11, she found herself completely locked out of her account. A message appeared saying she needed to download Facebook’s malware scanner if she wanted to get back in. Charity couldn’t use Facebook until she completed the scan, but the file the company provided was for a Windows device—Charity uses a Mac.

  • Tinder plugs flaw that enabled account takeover using just a phone number

    As Tinder uses Facebook profile pics for its users to lure in a mate or several, the 'dating' app is somewhat tied to the social network. When a swipe-hungry Tinder user comes to login to their account they can either do so via Facebook or use their mobile number.

  • `

Android Leftovers