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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source and Enterprise App Development

    To open source or not to open source, that is the question for many IT teams that are struggling with deciding on the best approach to mobile application development. There is no doubt that today’s broad array of open source offerings appear to offer development nirvana – free, community driven, customizable software.

  • Bringing IoT to Fruition with Fully Open Source Software

    Non-profit foundations can help encourage fully open source software (FOSS) collaboration across industry and community. A relative newcomer is the prpl Foundation, an open-source non-profit foundation focused on enabling next-generation datacenter-to-device portable software and virtualized architectures. One of prpl's focus areas is OpenWrt, a Linux distribution for embedded devices. Industry and community collaboration on a common FOSS baseline software stack can help facilitate new IoE products, applications and technologies, and enable easier connectivity and data exchange across a variety of platforms in the market.

  • The Potential of the Blockchain: LinuxCon Keynote Preview

    There are many similarities between Linux and the blockchain and so I was thrilled that Greg Maxwell, one of the core Bitcoin maintainers and a long term open source and cryptogrophy developer, accepted my invitation to keynote LinuxCon this year. I recently caught up with him to talk about his speech and the potential he sees for the Blockchain.

  • Open Source T-Shirt Contest
  • Mozilla flings glove at Microsoft's feet: Firefox 40 will PWN Edge

    Mozilla has released Firefox 40, featuring a new look for Windows 10, better protection against uncertified add-ons, and an attempt to resist Microsoft’s effort to make Edge the default browser.

  • LibreOffice 5.0, one week later

    Following the announcement, donations have doubled in comparison to the previous weeks. As a consequence, we have reached the threshold of 150,000 donations since May 2013, when we started keeping track of the numbers. A huge thanks to all donors! With their money, they make LibreOffice sustainable, supporting the costs of the entire organization.

  • LibreOffice 5 released with bug fixes, cloud and mobile aspirations

    LibreOffice, the non-Microsoft and (to many) beloved office suite, has reached a new milestone with the release of version 5. It’s of particular interest to Linux mavens, but the rest of LibreOffice users will benefit as well, thanks to an impressive boost in performance through GPU hardware and some interesting new features.

  • Bright Computing Offers its Own OpenStack, Plus Educational "Vodcasts"
  • App management startup WSO2 raises $20M to fuel global expansion

    Open-source app management startup WSO2 raised $20 million in funding on Thursday to expand the company’s global operations.

  • Open Source Cloud and Middleware Company WSO2 Attracts $20 Million in Funding Led by Pacific Controls, Global Provider of Internet of Things Managed Solutions
  • Two Year Anniversary

    We're quickly approaching our two-year anniversary, which will be on episode 105. To celebrate, we've created a unique t-shirt design, available for purchase until the end of August. Shirts will be shipped out around September 1st. Most of the proceeds will support the show, and specifically allow us to buy additional equipment to record on-site interviews at conferences.

  • Random Windows licensing facts

    These facts brought to you by “let me just stick the GPL in an ACPI table so I can install the damn thing already”.

  • Your "Infrastructure as Code" is still code!

    Whether you’re a TDD zealot, or you just occasionally write a quick script to reproduce some bug, it’s a rare coder who doesn’t see value in some sort of automated testing. Yet, somehow, in all of the new-age “Infrastructure as Code” mania, we appear to have forgotten this, and the tools that are commonly used for implementing “Infrastructure as Code” have absolutely woeful support for developing your Infrastructure Code. I believe this has to change.

  • The making of ZeMarmot: planning
  • Assign Phabricator reviewers based on module ownership

    Inspired by Quora's Moving Fast With High Code Quality post, we are thus implementing a review routing system - the code is live on GitHub at phabricator-utils. It's written in Python (hey, we're a Java/JS/Python shop), though we do plan to contribute closer to the Phabricator codebase itself and that will be in PHP.

More in Tux Machines

Amazon Linux 2022 Benchmarks - Offers Competitive Performance Against Ubuntu, CentOS

Last week Amazon Web Services released Amazon Linux 2022 in preview form and since then I've been trying out their new cloud-optimized Linux distribution. It's been working out well on AWS (to no surprise) but also great was the level of performance provided by this now-Fedora-based distribution. Amazon Linux 2022 transitions to being a Fedora-based Linux distribution that AWS intends to support for at least the next five years. Amazon Linux to this point had been based on a combination of RHEL and Fedora packages. Besides shifting the package base to Fedora, AWS engineers have adjusted various defaults of the distribution, employed extra kernel hardening, other package updates/changes, forthcoming kernel live patching, and other alterations in the name of security and AWS performance. Read more

Android Leftovers

Bootlin contributions to Linux 5.14 and 5.15

It’s been a while we haven’t posted about Bootlin contributions to the Linux kernel, and in fact missed both the Linux 5.14 and Linux 5.15 releases, which we will cover in this blog post. Linux 5.14 was released on August 29, 2021. The usual KernelNewbies.org page and the LWN articles on the merge window (part 1 and part 2) provide the best summaries of the new features and hardware support offered by this release. Read more

CaribouLite RPi HAT open-source SDR Raspberry Pi HAT tunes up to 6 GHz (Crowdfunding)

CaribouLite RPi HAT is an open-source dual-channel software-defined radio (SDR) Raspberry Pi HAT – or rather uHAT – that works in the sub-GHz ISM range and optionally the 30 MHz – 6 GHz range for the full version. Developed by Israel-based CaribouLabs, the micro HAT is equipped with a Lattice Semi ICE40LP1K FPGA, a Microchip AT86RF215 RF transceiver, two SMA antenna connectors, a Pmod expansion connector, and designed for any Raspberry Pi board with a 40-pin GPIO header. Read more