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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open Source and Enterprise App Development

    To open source or not to open source, that is the question for many IT teams that are struggling with deciding on the best approach to mobile application development. There is no doubt that today’s broad array of open source offerings appear to offer development nirvana – free, community driven, customizable software.

  • Bringing IoT to Fruition with Fully Open Source Software

    Non-profit foundations can help encourage fully open source software (FOSS) collaboration across industry and community. A relative newcomer is the prpl Foundation, an open-source non-profit foundation focused on enabling next-generation datacenter-to-device portable software and virtualized architectures. One of prpl's focus areas is OpenWrt, a Linux distribution for embedded devices. Industry and community collaboration on a common FOSS baseline software stack can help facilitate new IoE products, applications and technologies, and enable easier connectivity and data exchange across a variety of platforms in the market.

  • The Potential of the Blockchain: LinuxCon Keynote Preview

    There are many similarities between Linux and the blockchain and so I was thrilled that Greg Maxwell, one of the core Bitcoin maintainers and a long term open source and cryptogrophy developer, accepted my invitation to keynote LinuxCon this year. I recently caught up with him to talk about his speech and the potential he sees for the Blockchain.

  • Open Source T-Shirt Contest
  • Mozilla flings glove at Microsoft's feet: Firefox 40 will PWN Edge

    Mozilla has released Firefox 40, featuring a new look for Windows 10, better protection against uncertified add-ons, and an attempt to resist Microsoft’s effort to make Edge the default browser.

  • LibreOffice 5.0, one week later

    Following the announcement, donations have doubled in comparison to the previous weeks. As a consequence, we have reached the threshold of 150,000 donations since May 2013, when we started keeping track of the numbers. A huge thanks to all donors! With their money, they make LibreOffice sustainable, supporting the costs of the entire organization.

  • LibreOffice 5 released with bug fixes, cloud and mobile aspirations

    LibreOffice, the non-Microsoft and (to many) beloved office suite, has reached a new milestone with the release of version 5. It’s of particular interest to Linux mavens, but the rest of LibreOffice users will benefit as well, thanks to an impressive boost in performance through GPU hardware and some interesting new features.

  • Bright Computing Offers its Own OpenStack, Plus Educational "Vodcasts"
  • App management startup WSO2 raises $20M to fuel global expansion

    Open-source app management startup WSO2 raised $20 million in funding on Thursday to expand the company’s global operations.

  • Open Source Cloud and Middleware Company WSO2 Attracts $20 Million in Funding Led by Pacific Controls, Global Provider of Internet of Things Managed Solutions
  • Two Year Anniversary

    We're quickly approaching our two-year anniversary, which will be on episode 105. To celebrate, we've created a unique t-shirt design, available for purchase until the end of August. Shirts will be shipped out around September 1st. Most of the proceeds will support the show, and specifically allow us to buy additional equipment to record on-site interviews at conferences.

  • Random Windows licensing facts

    These facts brought to you by “let me just stick the GPL in an ACPI table so I can install the damn thing already”.

  • Your "Infrastructure as Code" is still code!

    Whether you’re a TDD zealot, or you just occasionally write a quick script to reproduce some bug, it’s a rare coder who doesn’t see value in some sort of automated testing. Yet, somehow, in all of the new-age “Infrastructure as Code” mania, we appear to have forgotten this, and the tools that are commonly used for implementing “Infrastructure as Code” have absolutely woeful support for developing your Infrastructure Code. I believe this has to change.

  • The making of ZeMarmot: planning
  • Assign Phabricator reviewers based on module ownership

    Inspired by Quora's Moving Fast With High Code Quality post, we are thus implementing a review routing system - the code is live on GitHub at phabricator-utils. It's written in Python (hey, we're a Java/JS/Python shop), though we do plan to contribute closer to the Phabricator codebase itself and that will be in PHP.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Kernel: Git, Intel, AMD and Bugs

       
  • Applying mailing list patches with 'git b4'

    b4 was created by Konstantin Ryabitsev and has become a very frequently used tool for me. It supports a lot of different ways for interacting with the Linux Kernel mailing lists. Of these the b4 am subcommand is what I primarily use. This subcommand downloads all of the patches belonging to a patch series and drops them into a .mbox file. But! It doesn't apply them to the repository we're currently in, and herein lies the itch that I would like to scratch.

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  • Intel Lunar Lake ‘Next-Gen’ Core CPUs Get First Support In Linux Patches, Expected To Succeed Meteor Lake By 2023

    The support page was spotted by Coelacanth's Dream (via Osuosi / Videocardz). The patch adds support for Intel Lunar Lake CPUs on the Ethernet e1000e network driver (Gigabyte NIC for Linux and Virtual Systems). The Lunar Lake is clearly listed as a next-gen Client Platform which confirms that it will be launching for both desktop and mobility segments. Other than that, there's not much that we can decipher from the support page.  

  • AMD Has A Very Exciting Announcement Next Week

    On the desktop side, Ryzen 5000 Zen 3 processors continue impressing on Linux that make us all the more excited for the EPYC 7003 series. 

  • Linux Kernel 5.12 rc-1 Not Ready for Use

    In a recent message on the Linux Kernel Mailing List, Linus Torvalds warned everyone not to use the 5.12-rc1 kernel, due to an “unusually nasty bug” that was not caught during normal testing. “The reason is fairly straightforward,” Torvalds explains, “this merge window, we had a very innocuous code cleanup and simplification that raised no red flags at all, but had a subtle and very nasty bug in it: swap files stopped working right … the offset of the start of the swap file was lost.”  Swapping still happened, he says, “but it happened to the wrong part of the filesystem, with the obvious catastrophic end results.” 

Games: GamerOS, MakerKing, Island Artist, Receiver 2

  • Sofa gaming Linux distro GamerOS version 23 is out continuing to fill the gap of SteamOS | GamingOnLinux

    Filling in the gap left by Valve leaving SteamOS alone, the sofa / couch gaming distribution GamerOS has a brand new release available with the usual great improvements. Booting directly into Steam Big Picture mode, the idea is to have this is the only install on a machine hooked up to a TV. Perhaps in a living room or a dedicated gaming room. It takes things a step or two further though, including plenty of extra enhancements for emulators and non-Steam games with their special tools like Steam Buddy.

  • Mario Maker-like platformer MakerKing has a huge update, lets you make mobs | GamingOnLinux

    MakerKing (previously called Jumpaï), is a free to play 2D indie platformer in the spirit of Mario Maker where all players can design their own levels. The whole idea is to design and share, then play the creations from other people. Not only that, you can also play directly online with others to compete on your favourite levels. Along with a name change to MakerKing, a huge 0.8 version upgrade recently went out which gives the game quite a nice overhaul. The big headline feature is that you can now add in your own mobs, created by sticking parts together - it's actually quite amusing.

  • Island Artist is a short and sweet game about relaxing and being creative | GamingOnLinux

    Love your small experimental games? I sure do and one I came across recently called Island Artist is absolutely wonderful. It features a hand-crafted world where you walk around and create wonderful paintings. It reminds me quite a lot of Shutter Stroll and gives off that same kind of vibe. There's no depth to the game other than walk around, chill out and perhaps create your next masterpiece, although the tools are simple so don't expect too much from it. Something to help you find that inner peace on a rainy day perhaps?

  • First-person gun simulator action game Receiver 2 gets a proper practice area

    Love a good shooter? What about one where there's a lot of simulation going on with the weapons directly? Receiver 2 gives you quite a bit to learn and now you can actually get some practice in. The key point about Receiver 2 is that it simulates every internal part of each firearm based on manufacturer schematics and gunsmithing resources. This means you can actually learn exactly how each sidearm works, including how to load and unload them, clear malfunctions, and operate their safety features. Educational? Perhaps but it's also an action game about taking down drones and collecting tapes.

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Might See Micro-Architecture Packages For Better Performance

One of the many great programs at SUSE is the roughly annual program where their developers can focus for one week on any new open-source development they desire. SUSE Hack Week has led to many great innovations and improvements since it began in the mid-2000s and for the Hack Week later this month there is one project attempt we are eager to see tackled. Proposed ahead of this year's SUSE Hack Week 20 event, which runs the last week of March, is supporting glibc-hwcaps and providing micro-architecture package generation support for openSUSE Tumbleweed and down the line for SLE/Leap. [...] SUSE's Antonio Larrosa is planning to experiment with the new capabilities and initially investigate a handful of libraries that would stand to benefit from the HWCAPS functionality. This would be catering to the openSUSE/SUSE buid process and establishing RPM macros and documentation in helping guide packagers around creating micro-architecture packages. The current plan would be to spin the different micro-architecture packages into separate packages that can be installed by the user to supplement the generic package if they are wanting to pursue the optimized packages in the name of greater performance. Read more