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Using the Fluxbox Window Manager

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Fluxbox
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I started using Linux in the pre-KDE and pre-GNOME days. These have become pretty much the de-facto graphic user interface for Linux and with good reason. Their spit and polish, usability and functionality rival the best commercial desktop interfaces, like Mac OS 10. Their stability goes way beyond the most popular, Microsoft Windows. I must confess though that despite the quality of both of these projects, I have never quite warmed up to using them. I have tried them for perhaps 3 weeks to a month at a time. I have sometimes started using them again after a major update only to go back to my first window manager, FVWM, after a week or so. I can't really put my finger on the actual beef I have with KDE and GNOME, but I can't stay with them for very long. I want to stress that in no way I am disparaging these wonderful projects. Thanks to the work of the KDE and GNOME people, Linux's desktop share is growing every day. Users migrating from the MS Windows platform primarily, find them familiar and therefore easy to work with. Thanks to them, Linux will soon make the execs in Redmond, Washington break out in cold sweats. Again, I had always stuck with my trusted FVWM. That was, until, out of curiosity, I tried Fluxbox.

What is Fluxbox

Fluxbox is a minimalist window manager based on Blackbox, which is, in turn, is another minimalist window manager. What do I mean by minimalist?

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