Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Using the Fluxbox Window Manager

Filed under
Fluxbox
HowTos

I started using Linux in the pre-KDE and pre-GNOME days. These have become pretty much the de-facto graphic user interface for Linux and with good reason. Their spit and polish, usability and functionality rival the best commercial desktop interfaces, like Mac OS 10. Their stability goes way beyond the most popular, Microsoft Windows. I must confess though that despite the quality of both of these projects, I have never quite warmed up to using them. I have tried them for perhaps 3 weeks to a month at a time. I have sometimes started using them again after a major update only to go back to my first window manager, FVWM, after a week or so. I can't really put my finger on the actual beef I have with KDE and GNOME, but I can't stay with them for very long. I want to stress that in no way I am disparaging these wonderful projects. Thanks to the work of the KDE and GNOME people, Linux's desktop share is growing every day. Users migrating from the MS Windows platform primarily, find them familiar and therefore easy to work with. Thanks to them, Linux will soon make the execs in Redmond, Washington break out in cold sweats. Again, I had always stuck with my trusted FVWM. That was, until, out of curiosity, I tried Fluxbox.

What is Fluxbox

Fluxbox is a minimalist window manager based on Blackbox, which is, in turn, is another minimalist window manager. What do I mean by minimalist?

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Git 2.11, Xfce 4.12.3, FFmpeg 3.2.1 & Mesa 13.0.2

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system. Read more

What Is A VPN Connection? Why To Use VPN?

We all have heard about VPN sometime. Most of us normal users of internet use it. To bypass the region based restrictions of services like Netflix or Youtube ( Yes, youtube has geo- restrictions too). In fact, VPN is actually mostly used for this purpose only. ​ Read
more

The Libreboot C201 from Minifree is really really really ridiculously open source

Open source laptops – ones not running any commercial software whatsoever – have been the holy grail for free software fans for years. Now, with the introduction of libreboot, a truly open source boot firmware, the dream is close to fruition. The $730 laptop is a bog standard piece of hardware but it contains only open source software. The OS, Debian, is completely open source and to avoid closed software the company has added an Atheros Wi-Fi dongle with open source drivers rather than use the built-in Wi-Fi chip. Read more