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Why is Linux So Great? Because It’s Open Source!

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GNU
Linux
OSS

What can’t Linux do? Nowadays you hear Linux powering just about any device imaginable — all the way from dime-sized computers via the Raspberry Pi all the way to most of the top 100 supercomputers in the world. We interact with it daily, whether it be on our personal computers, Android devices, Steam boxes (gaming), flight entertainment systems, web servers that power behemoths such as Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia, or more.

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More in Tux Machines

Firefox 83 vs. Chrome 87 On Intel Tiger Lake + AMD Renoir Under Linux

With this month's release of Chrome 87 having more performance improvements while Firefox 83 debuted with its "Warp" JavaScript improvements, it's a good time for some fresh Linux web browser benchmarks of these two main options. Plus with Firefox 84 to begin enabling WebRender by default in some Linux configurations, there is also a fresh run of Firefox with WebRender enabled. This round of weekend browser benchmarking featured Firefox 83, Firefox 83 with WebRender force enabled for all tests, and then Chrome 87. Tests were done on an AMD Ryzen 5 4500U and Intel Core i7 1165G7 notebooks (the latest Renoir and Tiger Lake hardware I have available for testing). Read more

7 Best Free and Open Source Python Data Validation

Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Programmers and data scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. Here’s our recommendations for performing data validation using Python. All of the software is free and open source goodness. Read more

How to solve NetBeans IDE 8.2 RC No compatible JDK was found?

When you trying to install NetBeans IDE 8.2 RC in your Linux based system it shows you the error “No compatible JDK was found” What does mean of no compatible JDK was found? It means that you have to install JDK or you have to use a different version of JDK most probably “JDK 8” will work. By Default, JDK 11 is installed in our system so we have to download JDK 8 and change the default version with java 8. So ,I’ll show you how to resolve this minor issue. Read more

today's howtos

  • Renaming and reshaping Scylla tables using scylla-migrator

    We have recently faced a problem where some of the first Scylla tables we created on our main production cluster were not in line any more with the evolved schemas that recent tables are using. This typical engineering problem requires either to keep those legacy tables and data queries or to migrate it to the more optimal model with the bandwagon of applications to be modified to query the data the new way… That’s something nobody likes doing but hey, we don’t like legacy at Numberly so let’s kill that one! To overcome this challenge we used the scylla-migrator project and I thought it could be useful to share this experience.

  • How to manage users in linux - The Linux Juggernaut

    User management on Linux can be done in three complementary ways. You can use the graphical tools provided by your distribution. These tools have a look and feel that depends on the distribution. If you are a novice Linux user on your home system, then use the graphical tool that is provided by your distribution. This will make sure that you do not run into problems. Another option is to use command line tools like useradd, usermod, gpasswd, passwd and others. Server administrators are likely to use these tools, since they are familiar and very similar across many different distributions. This guide will focus on these command line tools. A third and rather extremist way is to edit the local configuration files directly using vi (or vipw/vigr). Do not attempt this as a novice on production systems!

  • How To Install Django on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Django on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, Django is the most popular Python web framework designed to help developers build secure, scalable, and maintainable web applications. Django is free and open-source software, fast and stable which allows you to create a complex website with less coding. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Django Web Framework on a Debian 10 (Buster).

  • How to run a program as another user on Linux - The Linux Juggernaut

    The sudo program allows a user to start a program with the credentials of another user. Before this works, the system administrator has to set up the /etc/sudoers file. This can be useful to delegate administrative tasks to another user (without giving the root password). The screenshot below shows the usage of sudo. User ‘rd’ received the right to run useradd with the credentials of root. This allows ‘rd’ to create new users on the system without becoming root and without knowing the root password.

  • Terraform with AWS S3 and DynamoDB for Remote State Files

    By default, Terraform state files are generated locally. This is not ideal when you have multiple people working on a project.

  • How to Install PHP 8 on CentOS 7/8
  • Testing xdotool linux tool .

    Xdotool is a free and open source command line tool for simulating mouse clicks and keystrokes. You can create beautiful scrips and tools with this command.

  • How to Turn Your Raspberry Pi into a Plex Streaming Media Server | Tom's Hardware

    Now that Ubuntu Desktop is available for Raspberry Pi 4, users no longer need to fiddle with terminal commands to enjoy Plex Media Server on Raspberry Pi. In this article, we will set up Ubuntu Desktop and turn our Raspberry Pi into a streaming media server. We have chosen Plex Media Server since it is available in the Ubuntu Appliance portfolio. Check out our recent article on the Ubuntu Appliance portfolio for Raspberry Pi here.