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Portland Project betas common tools for GNOME, KDE

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Software

The Portland Project, the collaborative venture of Linux vendors and developers to simplify the process of porting and integrating applications for Linux desktops, has announced the beta release of its first application tools for the Linux desktop's GNOME and KDE environments.

The Portland Project's beta includes a suite of command line tools that are designed to help ISVs (independent software vendors) install their applications in the major Linux desktop environments. Portland's programming interfaces build upon established freedesktop.org specifications to provide developers with easy-to-use tools that automate implementation.

The beta is designed to automate the most commonly used desktop integration tasks, such as activating a web browser and starting an email composer.

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