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Film directors responding to Internet feedback

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Long before the summer thriller Snakes on a Plane slithers into theaters in July, potentially venomous fans started rattling.

The film's title says everything you need to know about the plot: On a trans-Pacific flight, a Hawaiian mobster trying to eliminate a protected witness uncorks a carton of poisonous serpents.

But as Web sites posted details during pre-production and shooting last summer, B-movie fans began to react. They wanted more creative snake attacks, more gore, more nudity and more of star Samuel L. Jackson's signature four-syllable f-bombs.

How much of the chorus was sincere, and how much was a desire to propel a quirky plot over the top, is unclear.

Nevertheless, based in part on the Internet comments, director David R. Ellis re-shot scenes to make the attacks more violent, the sex more explicit and the language more profane - including adding an expletive-laden line of dialogue from Jackson.

Full Story.

I'm sorry to say but this is

I'm sorry to say but this is one of the dumbest movies ever. I am disappointed that someone like Samuel L. Jackson allowed himself to be "used" in such a horrible movie. I am even more curious as to what propelled him to take on this project. I get what the makers of this movie were trying to do; but they weren't able to put justice to their ideas. The plot was too shallow, it was bit dragging, and if there was a climax to the movie, I sure missed it.

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