Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Should I switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice or Microsoft Office?

    [Ed: yes, it's Microsoft Jack promoting Microsoft Office again]

  • Hello, Columbus: Ohio LinuxFest Up Next Oct. 2-3

    Next up on Brother FOSS’s Traveling Salvation Show — pack up the babies and grab the old ladies and everyone go — brings the proverbial tent and revival show to Columbus, Ohio, at the beginning of next month.

  • Gandi Joins Open Source Initiative Corporate Sponsorship Program

    Sponsorship consolidates technical infrastructure and support for OSI’s web hosting and administrative systems.

  • Building efficiency software available as open source code

    A set of automated calibration techniques for tuning residential and commercial building energy efficiency software models to match measured data is now available as an open source code. The Autotune code, developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is available on GitHub.

  • ORNL-Developed Building Efficiency Software Now Available
  • Project Calico: Open Source, High-Scale Network Fabric For The Cloud

    Cloud developers and operators are facing a challenge: Much of the IT toolkit that has worked well for "silo" architectures and well enough for virtual machine environments isn't a good match for apps made using containers or for microservices, where components may be not just on different machines but in many locations, and instances may come, go, or multiply. Yesterday’s "network fabric" does not accommodate this activity efficiently or reliably.

  • The True Internet of Things

    For a clear and encouraging look at where this should be going, read Phil Windley. He not only writes eloquently about the IoT, but he has been working on GPL'd open-source code for things and how they relate. To me, Phil is the Linus of IoT—or will be if people jump in and help out with the code. Whether Phil fills that role or not, nobody has more useful or insightful things to say about IoT. That's why I decided to interview him here.

  • SAP Hana Vora to Bridge Spark and Hadoop

    SAP is out to create closer connections between the worlds of Big Data and Business Intelligence. The company is embracing Spark via SAP HANA Vora, a new in-memory query engine that leverages and extends the Spark framework to produce enriched Hadoop queries and experiences.

  • VMware Integrated OpenStack 2.0 Arrives, Based on Kilo
  • Android developers can now build Chrome custom tabs into their apps

    Google released Chrome 45 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android yesterday, and today we’re learning that the Android update includes support for a new feature called Chrome custom tabs. You can download the new Chrome version now from Google Play, but you won’t see Chrome custom tabs right away — today’s news is primarily aimed at developers. That said, Google has partnered with a few apps already — Feedly, The Guardian, Medium, Player.fm, Skyscanner, Stack Overflow, Tumblr, and Twitter will support custom tabs “in the coming weeks.”

  • FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black (with networking)

    I set out to run FreeBSD on my Beagle Bone Black (now dubbed “smurf” by the kids on account of it’s small and blue), for network services. My DSL modem is a crappy under-configurable thing, but I don’t dare to start hacking on it directly because it runs the telephony side of things, too. So I decided to use the Beagle Bone Black to take control of my home network.

  • Ireland strengthens its Open Data strategy with a governance body and a new portal

    The Irish Government opened an ‘expression of interest’ for a new open data public body in charge of the Open Data Strategy Governance and presented a new version of the national Open Data portal.

  • Scotland released an open data resource pack

    The Scottish government has published an open data resource pack aimed at helping all local public authorities to implement their own open data plan. This resource pack has been developed to support the Open Data Strategy of Scotland.

  • Bulgarians having a date with data

    This summer, the Bulgarian Council of Ministers organised 'A Date with Data'. The theme for this one-day event was 'Open Data for Transparent Governance'. The programme featured presentations, panel discussions, demonstrations of visualisations, and other applications of open data.

  • ​SanDisk and Nexenta release open-source, flash software-defined storage array

    SanDisk is best known for storage. Led by Nithya Ruff, the company's head of open-source strategy, the company is integrating open-source into storage. In their latest deal with Nexenta, an open source software-defined storage leader, the pairing of NexentaStor with SanDisk's all-flash InfiniFlash IF100 system underlines this shift.

  • Nexenta Extends Its Global Market Leadership in Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage (OpenSDS) Platform with Simplified Management, Advanced Automation and Real-Time Analytic Capabilities
  • Free and open source online 3D modeling tool CraftML launches beta version

    Over the past few years we’ve noticed that portions of the 3D printing community have regularly struggled with 3D modeling software. After all, the hobby itself isn’t cheap, so do you splurge on expensive, professional tools, or do you stick to a more limited free one? And does your programming experience limit your choice, or are you willing to learn a new language for the sake of the software you found? If you’ve struggled with these issues yourself or are unhappy with your current setup, then we’ve got some good news for you: a brand new, free and open source online 3D modeling tool has just launched a beta version; called CraftML, it is especially interesting for being accessible through common web technologies including html, css and Javascript.

  • Cross-compiling a PowerPC64 LE kernel and hitting a GCC bug
  • Code ninjas earn "belts" with CoderDojo

    But where, one may ask, will we as a global workforce find the next generation of bright young programmers, hardware engineers, and system administrators? This is the problem being addressed—in part—by CoderDojo, an Ireland-based international organization of more than 700 coding clubs worldwide. By engaging young people ages 7-17 in informal, creative environments, independent clubs of youngsters can learn web and application development along with other opportunities to explore technology and learn what excites them. Volunteer adults lead the local clubs, called Dojos, and teams of mentors and helpers are working together to keep the Dojo active and healthy. The kids are usually referred to as Ninjas and can complete activities and earn belts as their skills grow, although most clubs are using color-coded USB bracelets to signify ranks.

  • Stupid RCU Tricks: Hand-over-hand traversal of linked list using SRCU

More in Tux Machines

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.

today's howtos

  • How to deploy the Jitsi Meet conferencing server with Ubuntu 22.04 | TechRepublic

    Jitsi is an open-source, free conferencing server that can handle chat, video and VOIP conferencing. It’s a great alternative to the likes of Skype and Zoom. You can quickly deploy Jitsi and use it as an in-house solution or even open it up to the public. I want to show you how easy it is to deploy Jitsi on Ubuntu 22.04. You can deploy this with either a fully qualified domain name or using a server with just an IP address. For simplicity’s sake, I’ll demonstrate using an IP address, which is a great option for an internal solution.

  • How to Install LXQt Desktop Environment on Debian 11 - ByteXD

    The LXQt environment is a lightweight desktop environment for the Qt application framework. This environment aims to provide a modern and easy-to-use desktop environment for Linux. LXQt is emerging as one of the popular DEs in the Linux world, and it supports the most popular distributions like Arch, Ubuntu, Fedora, and others. In this article, we will show you how to install LXQt Desktop Environment on Debian 11 operating system.

  • Learning ACPI for ARM64 part 1: Finding the Root. | Adam Young's Web Log

    It started as a request from our tech lead: please help triage these patches. So I lookedat the set of patches and started with what looked like the simplest one:

  • Check Your Battery's Health from the Command Line with Battop - OMG! Ubuntu!

    I recently came across a cool terminal app that help you check your battery health from the command line. It’s called Battop and it’s open source software written in Rust. I ran into it after I went looking for a GUI battery status tool for Linux similar to CoconutBattery for macOS (it’s a menu-bar app that shows battery health, condition, capacity, temperature, voltage and so on). A lot of the guides and tutorials that walk through how to check battery info on Linux all agree on one thing: use upower. It is a solid recommendation. Not only is upower very detailed but it’s dead easy to use as it’s enabled out-of-the-box in virtually every major Linux distro out there, Ubuntu included. One downside to using upower is that it’s a little utilitarian. It prints a list and that’s it.