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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Why Does the Government Use Open Source Code?
  • Twitter open-sources Diffy, a tool for automatically spotting bugs in code

    Twitter is today announcing the availability of Diffy, a new piece of open-source software that developers can use to spot bugs when they’re making updates to certain parts of code.

    Twitter uses the code internally. Now the social networking company is releasing it to the rest of the world.

  • We wrote an open source bank parser

    Our first project is something I was already working on, an extensible parser to chew bank statements and shit out transaction sheets. We made a gem, made an API and learnt a lot in the process. (We even wrote a java API to unlock pdf files given a password. Whew!). We currently have a meager three bank support, but we've managed to build a framework that makes it super easy to add other banks and statement formats.

  • Google Patches Critical Vulnerabilities in Chrome 45
  • Chrome Browser Nearing 30 Percent Market Share [Ed: Calling Microsoft-connected firm “a prominent Web analytics company”]

    It's no secret that Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--both open source browsers--were locked in a neck-and-neck market share battle for a long time. The two browsers have remained on rapid release cycles, and for years they tended to leapfrog each other for market share in small increments each month.

  • FossaMail Open-Source Mail Client Launches Update

    FossaMail is built on the Mozilla Thunderbird client but without all the will-they-or-won’t-they of the rumors that Mozilla has done with Thunderbird. Even better, FossaMail is compatible with both Windows and Linux, while offering a 64-bit download in Windows to up the speed, address more memory, and perform other 64-bit operations.

    At the same time, FossaMail looks and feels just like Thunderbird, despite the oval tab fiasco. It still offers a contacts list, calendar, and chat, just like most users have come to expect from their email platforms. It’s so close to Thunderbird, in fact, that the developers didn’t bother with an extensive tutorial or FAQ, but instead just point users to the Thunderbird help section if they have any problems.

  • Proprietary vs. open source WCM [Ed: pro-proprietary]

    As it turns out, open source software is not always so free, proprietary software is not necessarily closed, and help from the open source community isn’t nearly as comprehensive as the level of support you get from a professional vendor.

  • Releases 1.19.1 of Tioga and 0.13.1 of ctioga2
  • ORNL Building Efficiency Software Available as Open Source Code
  • Autotune Code from ORNL Tunes Your Building Energy Efficiency
  • ORNL Offers Automated Calibration Software for Building Efficiency Studies as Open Source Code
  • Book cover for the Free Culture book finally done

    Creating a good looking book cover proved harder than I expected. I wanted to create a cover looking similar to the original cover of the Free Culture book we are translating to Norwegian, and I wanted it in vector format for high resolution printing. But my inkscape knowledge were not nearly good enough to pull that off.

  • Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

    goes against one of the arguments used more frequently to promote Free Software (which, in and by itself, is intrinsically weak, and therefore not used as the main one by the most experts) that is licensing costs. The graph clearly show that such costs (the leftmost column) are only a small part of the total. From left to right the columns show “software license costs”, “immaterial goods” (whatever that means…), “software acquisition and development”, “litigation and other legal expenses” (as much as licenses..), “software assistance and maintenance”

  • M$’s Licensing Costs Are Only The Tip Of The Iceberg Of IT – Look Below
  • There’s still a chance to save WiFi

    You may not know it, but wifi is under assault in the USA due to proposed FCC regulations about modifications to devices with modular radios. In short, it would make it illegal for vendors to sell devices with firmware that users can replace. This is of concern to everyone, because Wifi routers are notoriously buggy and insecure. It is also of special concern to amateur radio hobbyists, due to the use of these devices in the Amateur Radio Service (FCC Part 97).

More in Tux Machines

MX Linux MX-21 Xfce

MX Linux MX-21 Xfce is the complete opposite of my MX-21 KDE review - that one was delightful. The Xfce one is the worst experience I had with this distro, probably ever. I didn't really get to properly test anything due to the general sluggishness, the login freeze, the suspend & wake problems, the Firefox slowness, the kernel oops, and all the rest of it. But the visual customization did show me one important aspect - how much more advanced KDE is, and how fragile scaling is in Xfce. I really am not in the mood to manually tweak 20-30 separate Xfce elements just to have a nice, presentable desktop. That's 2005, and it needs to stop. The Xfce version of MX-21 ain't bad, but it's fragile. Worse yet, the distro behaved far better in the past, so we also have a regression on our hands. All I can say, go for the KDE version, it's amazing (among the best systems I ever tried). Whereas the Xfce one needs to go back to the workshop and get some serious rework. Alas, on that note, and with some mild paranoia swirling in my brain, we end this sad review. Read more

YouTube Downloader and Firefox in EasyOS

  • YouTube downloader fixes

    The YouTube downloader GUI is a frontend for /usr/bin/youtube-dl, which is a python script. A problem is that YouTube move the goal posts, in an attempt to stop these downloaders from working. The youtube-dl developers respond by changing their script so that it works again.

  • Firefox version 94.0.2

    Have just downloaded English, French and German Firefox 94.0.2 tarballs, and it will be in the next release of EasyOS.

Use BespokeSynth on Fedora Linux

Sun Aug 14 10:36:37 2016, this is the birth date of BespokeSynth. Since that date, BespokeSynth has grown a lot; both in terms of its user base and the size of its codebase. BespokeSynth is an application for performing modular synthesis. Because it has been written by a newcomer to modular synthesis, it is quite different from the usual modular synthesizer. Note: I am the manager of the LinuxMAO / Audinux Copr repository. Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Writing and unit testing a Python application to query the RPM database | Enable Sysadmin

    When installing software on a Linux system, your package manager keeps track of what's installed, what it's dependent upon, what it provides, and much more. The usual way to look at that metadata is through your package manager. In the case of Fedora or Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it is the RPM database. The RPM database can be queried from the command line with the rpm command, which supports some very nice formatting options. For example, to get a list of all packages sorted by size, I can use a little bit of Bash glue to do the following:

  • How DevSecOps brings security into the development process

    DevSecOps is an extension of DevOps that emphasizes security automation and cooperation across the organization. More than just hype, DevSecOps is a crucial addition to your organization's development and deployment processes, especially given the range of ransomware groups, industrial spies, identity thieves, and other attackers plaguing today's cyberworld. In this article, you will learn how DevSecOps extends familiar DevOps tools and processes to help cross-functional teams work together on the design and implementation of security policies and procedures.

  • Kubernetes and OpenShift: The best of 2021

    2021 was a big year in the world of Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift, and over the past twelve months, we have aimed to provide content that will satisfy developer curiosity on how to best use these platforms, from info on the big release of OpenShift 4.8 to tutorials on deploying Helm charts and working with OpenShift Serverless Functions. Keep reading for these highlights and more.

  • Quarkus, containers, and Java: Tune in to Jconf.dev 2021

    The Jconf.dev community Java conference is going virtual for 2021, which means that developers worldwide will be able to stream sessions of interest wherever they are. The conference is on December 9, and a number of Red Hatters are presenting material that will be of interest to the developer community. Read on to learn more and find out when to tune in.

  • Our top 5 Harvard Business Review articles of 2021

    Each month, through our partnership with Harvard Business Review, we share five new HBR articles we believe CIOs and IT leaders will value highly. As 2021 comes to a close, we are taking a look back at the five most popular HBR articles from this past year. Here are the stories that resonated with you.