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GNOME's Nautilus 3.18 Beta 2 File Manager Gets Multiple Improvements

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GNOME

A new development release of the Nautilus (Files) file manager has been published as part of the second Beta milestone towards the upcoming and anticipated GNOME 3.18 desktop environment.

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today's howtos

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Noise With Blanket

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Journal Expats, Linux Experiment, and Krita Artwork

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Kernel Leftovers

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