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UK government publishes ODF guidance

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The UK government on 7 September published recommendations and guidelines on the use and implementation of ODF, the Open Document Format. The compendium is authoritative, from its general introduction to the recommendations on procurement, a guide on integration of ODF with enterprise software, software that allows collaborating on documents and a review of ODF’s change tracking features.

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Programming Leftovers

  • A limitation on what 'go install' can install (as of Go 1.18)

    What is happening here is that internally, gospy uses packages from its own repository (module) and one of them, github.com/monsterxx03/gospy/pkg/term, in turn uses github.com/gizak/termui/v3. However, the github.com/monsterxx03/gospy module has a replace directive for this termui module that changes it to github.com/monsterxx03/termui/v3. If you clone the repository and run 'go install' inside it, everything works and you wind up with a gospy binary in your $HOME/go/bin. However, as we see here 'go install ...@latest' works differently enough that the replace directive causes this error. To fix the problem (ie, to build gospy or any program like it), you must clone the repository and run 'go install' in the right place inside the repository. (Alternately you can file bugs with the upstream to get them to fix this, for example by dropping the replace directive and directly using the replacement in their code. But if the upstream is neglected, this may not work very well.) Unsurprisingly, there is a long standing but closed Go issue on this 'go install' behavior, cmd/go: go install cmd@version errors out when module with main package has replace directive #44840.

  • ongoing by Tim Bray · Small Tables

    Computer programs organize bits and bytes into “data structures”. In software of any import, the data structures are usually more interesting than the code around them. This part of the Quamina Diary takes a close look at a very simple data structure that I have greatly enjoyed using to build finite automata, and which I think has lessons to teach; it’s called smallTable.

  • Difference between Brute Force and Dynamic Programming
  • Why do we need Prefix and Postfix notations?

    Prefix notation is the notation in which operators are placed before the corresponding operands in the expression.

  • What To Do (And Not to Do) with Modeling Proportions/Fractional Outcomes

    Limited dependent variables, or continuous variables with lower and upper bounds, are quite common in the social sciences but do not fit easily with existing statistical models. In this Rmarkdown document, I show why these issues are important to consider when modeling your data, discuss existing R packages useful for fitting these models, and also present ordbetareg, an R package with a new variant of Beta regression that builds on and simplifies existing approaches (see paper here that is forthcoming in Political Analysis). In essence, ordbetareg offers a drop-in replacement for OLS that respects the bounds of a dependent variable. I will be presenting this post as part of Leanne Powner’s Methods Cafe workshops via Zoom on Friday, July 1st, at 12 pm EST. You can find more info on the workshop along with Zoom links here. You can also get a copy of the Rmarkdown document here if you want to run the file yourself. Although I argue that ordbetareg is as useful or more useful than existing packages, I provide a broad overview in this document so that the reader can gain an appreciation for the range of work on this topic, as well as the pros and cons of existing models.

  • May 2022: “Top 40” New CRAN Packages | R-bloggers

    One hundred seventy-nine new packages made it to CRAN in May. Here are my “Top 40” picks in twelve categories: Computational Methods, Data, Ecology, Epidemiology, Finance, Machine Learning, Networks, Science, Statistics, Time Series, Utilities, and Visualization.

  • How to Find Unmatched Records in R | R-bloggers

    How to Find Unmatched Records in R?, To retrieve all rows in one data frame that do not have matching values in another data frame, use R’s anti_join() function from the dplyr package.

  • R Lille Group Organizer, Mickaël Canouil, Talks About Guiding New Users | R-bloggers

    R Consortium talks to Mickaël Canouil about the idea of reproducible teaching tools, cross-platform support, and the use of package building in his community. Mickaël says one of the most important things we can do to ensure that a language stays relevant is to ensure that we have new people using the language.

  • Tips for Rearranging Columns in R | R-bloggers

    Tips for Rearranging Columns in R, you might frequently want to reorder the columns in a data frame. The select() function from the dplyr package, fortunately, makes this simple to accomplish.

  • Experimenting with Quarto

    Quarto is the up-and-coming “next generation version of R Markdown” being developed by RStudio. It’s more or less a superset of R Markdown/knitr that’s suited to programming languages besides R. Quarto’s heading towards a 0.1, and I’ve started experimenting for a few client projects. So far I like the system a lot, and at this point I really think Quarto’s worth a try; especially since it’s available with the recent versions of RStudio.

  • Algorithms with Predictions

    The theoretical study of algorithms and data structures has been bolstered by worst-case analysis, where we prove bounds on the running time, space, approximation ratio, competitive ratio, or other measure that holds even in the worst case. Worst-case analysis has proven invaluable for understanding aspects of both the complexity and practicality of algorithms, providing useful features like the ability to use algorithms as building blocks and subroutines with a clear picture of the worst-case performance. More and more, however, the limitations of worst-case analysis become apparent and create new challenges. In practice, we often do not face worst-case scenarios, and the question arises of how we can tune our algorithms to work even better on the kinds of instances we are likely to see, while ideally keeping a rigorous formal framework similar to what we have developed through worst-case analysis. A key issue is how we can define the subset of "instances we are likely to see." Here we look at a recent trend in research that draws on machine learning to answer this question. Machine learning is fundamentally about generalizing and predicting from small sets of examples, and so we model additional information about our algorithm's input as a "prediction" about our problem instance to guide and hopefully improve our algorithm. Of course, while ML performance has made tremendous strides in a short amount of time, ML predictions can be error-prone, with unexpected results, so we must take care in how much our algorithms trust their predictors. Also, while we suggest ML-based predictors, predictions really can come from anywhere, and simple predictors may not need sophisticated machine learning techniques. For example, just as yesterday's weather may be a good predictor of today's weather, if we are given a sequence of similar problems to solve, the solution from the last instance may be a good guide for the next.

  • The 7 Best Linux Text Editors and Gedit Alternatives [Ed: Truly terrible list. promotes Microsoft's proprietary software (spyware even), Microsoft's soon-to-be-dead editor that's bloat, and a bunch of non-free stuff before getting to good options]

    Gedit, the default text editor for Ubuntu and the GNOME desktop environment, is a nifty little app that's pretty handy indeed. However, it's not the only text editor available to Linux users. If you've been using Gedit for all these years, and want a text editor that's better suited to your needs, you should really consider switching to one of the other Linux editing apps. They're far more powerful and will make you twice, even thrice, as productive as before. So, let's explore some of the best Linux text editors that are great Gedit alternatives.

  • Introduction Test::Excel

    My first contribution to CPAN was Test::Excel. It was initiated as we had requirement for such at work at that time. It has gone through many changes, thanks to all for reporting issues and providing patches..

  • Let's Get to Rework

    Our new Hot-Air Rework Station is here along with a new LED Project Kit, RPi Picos, and Third-Hand Kit! Hello, everyone! We're back this week with more new products! If you stopped by yesterday, you probably already know about the new Raspberry Pi announcement with the addition of wireless capabilities and headers on two unique Pico boards. On top of that, we have a brand new version of our popular Hot-Air Rework Station with a new set of features that modernizes the instrument for todays standards. Following that, we have have a new LED Project Kit that is ideal for developing minds to start in electronics, as well as a new third hand kit! Alright, let's jump in and take a closer look!

12 Best Linux Games To Play In 2022

The gaming aspects of the Linux platform are evolving slowly but steadily. Still, people are very skeptical when it comes to gaming on this platform. But, from my personal experience, I see very little difference between Linux and Windows in terms of gaming. Linux OS is fully optimized for gaming which really makes optimum use of your system rig. With that in mind, many game developers are producing games with the Linux platform in mind. In this article, we have compiled a list of the best Linux games out there in the gaming arena. Read more

Kernel: TrueNAS, Linux Plumbers Conference, and Linux 5.20

  • SAS2008 LBA, Seagate Ironwolfs and scary log messages « Ville-Pekka Vainio's blog

    I built a home NAS two years ago, that was the first COVID summer and I finally had the time. It’s running Proxmox, which is running TrueNAS (then Core, now Scale) as a VM. An HBA card is passed directly to the TrueNAS VM. The HBA card is a Dell PERC H310, but I’ve crossflashed it so that now it shows up as an LSI SAS2008 PCI-Express Fusion-MPT SAS-2. The system originally had five ST4000VN008 disks (4 TB) in a RAIDZ2. Pretty much from the beginning I noticed the system was spewing out storage related error messages when booting up. ZFS also noticed, but after the TrueNAS VM was completely up, there were no more errors and I quite rarely rebooted or shut down the system, so I wasn’t too worried. The few read errors I got each boot I cleared with zpool clear, which probably was not the best idea. Last summer we had very cheap electricity here in Finland, something like 1-3 c/kWh plus transfer and taxes. Well, this summer it can be even 60 c/kWh during the worst times. I started shutting down my NAS when I knew we would not need it for a while. This made the disk issues worse.

  • Microconferences at Linux Plumbers Conference: System Boot and Security – Linux Plumbers Conference 2022

    Linux Plumbers Conference 2022 is pleased to host the System Boot and Security Microconference In the fourth year in a row, System Boot and Security microconference is are going to bring together people interested in the firmware, bootloaders, system boot, security, etc., and discuss all these topics. This year we would particularly like to focus on better communication and closer cooperation between different Free Software and Open Source projects. In the past we have seen that the lack of cooperation’s between projects very often delays introduction of very interesting and important features with TrenchBoot being very prominent example. The System Boot and Security MC is very important to improve such communication and cooperation, but it is not limited to this kind of problems. We would like to encourage all stakeholders to bring and discuss issues that they encounter in the broad sense of system boot and security.

  • Linux 5.20 Prepped For Intel’s Arc Alchemist Desktop Graphics Cards & Arctic Sound-M Server GPUs

    Intel's development team has done a fantastic job updating each kernel cycle to future-proof all versions. We have seen plenty of Intel DG2, and Arc Alchemist code merged into the i915 Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver, including the most recent Linux 5.19 kernel. This particular version of Linux has seen compute user-space ABI support that will be available for the DG2 architecture, as well as several PCI IDs included in DG2 that appear to be utilized for the company's notebook Arc graphics. Lastly, there have also been new features and hardware fixes for various issues since first working on the project.