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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Inkscape Workshop at Smallworld

    Last weekend, I had the first Inkscape workshop at smallworld. It was very successful, we had 13 participants.

  • Bugzilla Bug Tracker Was Key to Recent Firefox Security Snafu

    The Bugzilla bug tracker has been a major part of how Mozilla has kept Firefox secure and stable for a long time, but according to the company, it was also the key to a recent attack on Firefox browser users. "An attacker was able to break into a privileged user's account and download security-sensitive information about flaws in Firefox and other Mozilla products," Mozilla said Friday in an FAQ about the security snafu (PDF doownload available). "Information uncovered in our investigation suggests that the user re¬used their Bugzilla password with another website, and the password was revealed through a data breach at that site."

  • Open source platform as a service doesn't always come easy

    Open source platform as a service can ease cloud app development and deployment. But it also poses these six challenges for developers and the business.

  • WordPress 4.3 getting slow you might need an update

    I recently received Debian bug report #798350 where the user had a problem with wordpress. After upgrading to version 4.3, the webservers performance degrades over time. The problem is also reported at the wordpress site with bug WordPress ticket 33423 including the fix.

  • Apps, bots, drones, and 3D printers: Coming to a school near you?

    I work at a university, in the computer science department, and my college-age students have access to all this technology and more. Imagine the things they're able to do and create—better yet, imagine the things they'll be able to do and create in five years with the next generation of all these technologies in the workplace and at home.

  • 15 open web advocates to follow on Twitter

    Working on the Open Web is a niche area of the greater open source community. Usually the work does not get the same level of fanfare of other areas of open source, but the work is very important.

    Here, I've compiled a list of 15 people helping move the Open Web forward you should follow on Twitter. All of them are doing amazing work and have great content to share and will help keep you up to date on important things happening on the Open Web.

  • Every Lesson Is an Experiment with 'Open Source' Science Class

    If you ask Rosalind Poon about the science class of yester-year -- the kind my generation, my parents' generation and their parents' generation attended, where the entire class follows the same instructions for an experiment like it was a recipe for baking cookies -- it doesn't explain how real science happens.

    "If you think about champagne or penicillin," said Poon, teacher consultant with the Richmond School District and a trained biology teacher, "a lot of our discoveries are discovered by mistake."

  • Three New Experiments in Science Education
  • A closer look at the world's first open digital cinema camera

    The journey of the AXIOM camera began years ago with simple, small devices, and then gained suuport in 2014 with a successful Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign that exceeded its funding goal. A couple months later, a grant from the European Union gave the project the financial momentum it needed to move forward.

  • Reedsy Launches Open Source Author Survey

    How much money do authors typically make? And how much does it cost an author to self-publish a book?

    Questions like these are part of a new author survey launched by Reedsy, an all-encompassing self-publishing platform.

  • Open Data: 'civic engagement' is on the cusp

    Mark Headd is the key guy when it comes to developer evangelism at Accela -- the firm provides cloud-based 'civic engagement' solutions for government.

  • Pratham's big free for all

    On International Literacy Day today Pratham Books threw open a portal that makes their collection of original books free to download, read, and disseminate.

  • International Literacy Day: A digital open source for books and images

    It's part of children's rights: the right to education. And Pratham Books takes children very seriously. Their motto: a book in every child's hands has been something that they have worked together for, for many years.

  • HippyVM Sounds Interesting, But Only If It Would Work Right

    HippyVM is an open-source project that's striving for 100% compatibility with Zend PHP while being more than seven times faster than stock PHP and more than twice as fast as Facebook's HHVM.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Systems: Chromebooks, Windows, and Microsoft’s xClown

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.