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Erle Robotics

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Ubuntu
  • Six-legged, Ubuntu-powered spider drone is coming

    Erle Robotics, a Spanish company that makes robots, mainly drones, has started an Indiegogo campaign for their spider drone, called Erle Spider. This is the first legged drone powered by Canonical’s Snappy Ubuntu Core.

    Erle Robotics is trying to raise $50,000 through the campaign in 45 days through different packages or perks. The best package for those enthusiasts who like ‘do-it-yourself’ is for $399. It will get you one spider kit for assembly; the kit comes with all needed parts. Those who are not into DIY can pledge $569 and a fully assembled, ready to crawl spider will be delivered to their doorsteps. The most expensive tier of the campaign is the $11,600 university pack, which buys 30 Erle Spider DIY Kits and comes with full tech support.

  • Spiderlike bot’s controller runs Snappy Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi 2

    Erle Robotics has launched a six-legged Erle-Spider robot on Indiegogo, with an Erle-Brain 2 controller that runs Ubuntu Snappy and ROS on a Raspberry Pi 2.

  • Ubuntu-Powered Erle-Spider Land Drones Now on IndieGoGo with Promotional Price

    The Ubuntu-powered land drone Erle-Spider is now on IndieGoGo and its makers are trying to raise enough money for manufacturing.

More in Tux Machines

Stable Kernels: 5.19.1, 5.18.17, 5.15.60, 5.10.136, 5.4.210, and 4.19.255

I'm announcing the release of the 5.19.1 kernel.

All users of the 5.19 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.19.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.19.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.18.17 Linux 5.15.60 Linux 5.10.136 Linux 5.4.210 Linux 4.19.255

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Users Can Now Finally Upgrade to Ubuntu 22.04 LTS, Here’s How

For those of you not in the know, Canonical opens the upgrade path from the previous Ubuntu LTS release to the new Ubuntu LTS release about six months after the launch of the latter, but not after it publishes the first point release to the new Ubuntu LTS series (in this case Ubuntu 22.04.1 LTS). This is done to ensure a safe upgrade process. Read more

today's leftovers

  • /usr/games removed from the default $PATH

    So when you next sit down on a fresh snapshot install and want to do a quick rot13 or do a round of tetris, you may need to specify the full path.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: New News

    I’m going to kick off this post and month by saying that in my defense, I was going to write this post weeks ago, but then I didn’t, and then I got sidetracked, but I had the screenshots open the whole time so it’s not like I forgot, but then I did forget for a little while, and then my session died because the man the myth the legend the as-seen-on-the-web-with-a-different-meaning Adam “ajax” Jackson pranked me with a GLX patch, but I started a new session, and gimp recovered my screenshots, and I remembered I needed to post, and I got distracted even more, and now it’s like three whole weeks later and here we are at the post I was going to write last month but didn’t get around to but now it’s totally been gotten to. You’re welcome. [...] Render passes control how rendering works. There’s load operations which determine how data is retrieved from the framebuffer (I also hate framebuffers) attachments, there’s store operations which determine how data is stored back to the attachments (I hate this part too), and then there’s “dependencies” (better believe I hate these) which manage synchronization between operations, and input attachments (everyone hates these) which enable reading attachment data in shaders, and then also render pass instances have to be started and stopped any time any attachments or framebuffer geometry changes (this sucks), and to top it all off, transfer operations can’t be executed while render passes are active (mega sucks). Also there’s nested render passes, but I’m literally fearing for my life even mentioning them where other driver developers can see, so let’s move on.

  • The 5 Top App Definition and Build Tools From CNCF - Container Journal

    Kubernetes has evolved to become the foundation of the modern cloud-native stack. Yet, adopting this lovable beast of a container platform doesn’t come without its hurdles. Thankfully, many toolsets now exist to help engineers package, deploy and manage applications using Kubernetes. Below, we’ll look at some graduated and incubating CNCF tools that fit under the application definition and image build category. These open source packages address the operational concerns of Kubernetes, making it easier to install dependencies, generate Kubernetes operators, containerize VMs and more. If you want to improve the developer experience around Kubernetes adoption, these tools are an excellent first place to look.

  • CloudNativeDay: Google Sees Containers Improving App Reliability - Container Journal

    Containers and serverless computing frameworks play a critical role in making environments more resilient as organizations increasingly depend on the availability of applications to drive revenue. Steve McGhee, co-author of Enterprise Roadmap to SRE: How to Build and Sustain an SRE Function and a reliability advocate at Google, tells attendees at the virtual CloudNativeDay summit that smaller containers coupled with serverless computing frameworks make it simpler to build modular components that not only isolate dependencies but also make it easier to restore services in the event of a disruption.

Open Hardware/Modding: DAC2 Pro, Raspberry Pi, and More

  • HiFiBerry DAC2 Pro & HD review

    On the more affordable end is the DAC2 Pro. This features a dedicated 192kHz/24-bit DAC, low-jitter clocks, and low-noise voltage regulators, all with the purpose of producing the best sound possible at that price point. It also features a headphone amplifier for convenience.

  • Classroom activities to discuss machine learning accuracy and ethics | Hello World #18

    In Hello World issue 18, available as a free PDF download, teacher Michael Jones shares how to use Teachable Machine with learners aged 13–14 in your classroom to investigate issues of accuracy and ethics in machine learning models.

  • The Hacking of Starlink Terminals Has Begun

    Today, Lennert Wouters, a security researcher at the Belgian university KU Leuven, will reveal one of the first security breakdowns of Starlink’s user terminals, the satellite dishes (dubbed Dishy McFlatface) that are positioned on people’s homes and buildings. At the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas, Wouters will detail how a series of hardware vulnerabilities allow attackers to access the Starlink system and run custom code on the devices.

  • Open source chips from Germany are possible

    In order to be able to have semiconductor components manufactured that reliably do not contain any hidden or unwanted functions, the respective contract manufacturer must disclose the Process Design Kit (PDK) for his manufacturing technology. Until now, only the US contract manufacturer SkyWater has provided such an open-source PDK. Now the IHP Solutions department of the Leibniz Institute for High-Performance Microelectronics (IHP) in Frankfurt an der Oder is following suit.

    Frank Vater from the IHP announced at the Free Silicon Conference (FSiC) 2022 in Paris that the PDK for the in-house 130-nanometer manufacturing technology S13G2 would be disclosed. This allows chips with digital, analog and high-frequency circuit parts to be manufactured.

  • From Product To Burnout To Open-Source: The Ergo S-1 Keyboard Story

    [Andrew] from [Wizard Keyboards] emailed us and asked if we were interested in his story of developing an ergonomic keyboard as a product. Many of us can relate to trying to bring one of our ideas to market. [Andrew], being a mechanical keyboard geek, knew a niche with no product to satisfy it, and had a vision he wanted to implement. He started meticulously going through steps for bringing his keyboard idea into life as a manufacturable product, and gave himself six months to get it done.

  • A Fast Linear Actuator Entirely In One PCB

    There are many ways to make a linear actuator, a device for moving something is a straight line. Most of the easier to make ones use a conventional motor and a mechanical linkage such as a rack and pinion or a lead screw, but [Ben Wang] has gone for something far more elegant. His linear actuator uses a linear motor, a linear array of coils for the motor phases, working against a line of magnets. Even better than that, he’s managed to make the whole motor out of a single PCB. And it’s fast!

  • Your MicroPython Board Can Be Your Tinkering Peripheral

    [Brian Pugh] has shared a cool new project that simultaneously runs on desktop Python and MicroPython – the Belay library. This library lets you control a MicroPython device seamlessly from your Python code – interacting with real-world things like analog/digital trinkets, servos, Neopixels and displays, without having to create your own firmware or APIs.