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Baby did a bad bad thing....

Well from the last thing I wrote in here somewhere (being new means you have no idea where things are), things have changed on the laptop front. After writing some good things about Ubuntu I stumbled across some articles on Suse floating around the 'net and up pops the thought, "perhaps I didn't give it a proper go". Dangerous thought, very dangerous. After some deliberation it was probably a good idea to stick with what I had. So, off to the gym for some torture... erm... exercise. 2 hours later, sat in the bar trying to accumulate some fluids, an apprehensive looking wife says "we need to call at tescos on the way home"... I hate shopping.

Off we trot to tesco and I meander through the magazines section, Ooo, wonder if he'll be any good as bond? Nice tackle... fishing magazines, not that I do. No patience. New rebreather? How could I justify that to the tax man? Anyway, my gaze lands on Linux Format Magazine, hmmm, not seen that before. So I wander around the supermarket, head in the mag, following my wife... could have been anybody's wife. Suse 10.1 plus bits on the free DVD. Ati drivers too. The Ati drivers on my laptop never quite worked properly before (apart from under XP). I'm taking this the distance, to the checkout at once my good woman... well after an hour of browsing just about every aisle in the place.

Home at last, check mail, make tea, stick the madras in the oven and read the mag. The DVD is shinning there, and I'm a magpie. I lost the fight and stuck it into the DVD drive, install the ATI drivers and managed to break Ubuntu. Back to the prompt, X11 xorg copied, reboot and back in. Wonder if Suse would be better? Back into the thought danger zone. Backed up some files to the server (missing the mail file and some other bits DOH!). It's 11:30pm and I started to install Suse. What a good idea that was! 00:30am, still installing and what time do I have to get up? Oh right, that will be 6am then. 01:30am and installed. Don't know if it works, don't care, need sleep. There was a fight this morning with the alarm clock. Why why why can't I leave things alone!?!

Ok, so now I'm up, at work and struggling, this klix coffee would strip paint faster than brake fluid and I'm drinking pints of it, it's easier to write this than debug some of this PL/SQL. I brought in old faithful too and we have a lack of power outputs here and something about HSE and wires across office floors? Silly rule!. Suse is up and running again, on the main laptop this time (faster and newer than the one I tried it on last time). But.... it's a marvel chipset Netgear wireless and Suse no likey likey, connect to the internet it says, download something to fix it... hmmm, I'd like to see that one, no hard wires here, no phone sockets either, and to top it all off, I can't find my usb memory thing. Bugger. I wonder if the ati is recognised in 3D mode thing? Ah, direct = no. Isn't this where I was with Ubuntu only way behind? Click click click, and into some Yast configuration thing. Reboot and lo and behold, Direct = Yes, glxgear throwing out good performance. Still no network.

The laptop is a pentium IV, 2.5ghz, gig of ram (128 shared with ati), 60gb hard disk. It wasn't sluggish and ran XP quickly (when first installed, add the spyware, bugware, wifeware and that did bring it down a little) but it seems to run a tad sluggish with Suse, it wasn't exactly going to win speed awards with Ubuntu either but I heard somewhere that you can tweak this thing more than Ubuntu? It seems to take an age to open anything, nice splash screens though. Have I done a bad thing installing this? I guess it's a wait and see but I don't give up easily... I'll get it working by hook or crook, any tips for adding a nitros kit are very welcome! Oh, at the request of her that must be obeyed, it's running gnome not kde (can you install both and run one for one user and tuther for tuther?) Suse looks nice though, if only I had some dilithium crystals, a phaser and sonic screwdriver. We have ne power Jim!

It's all my wife's fault, I was happy Ubuntuing in Ubuntu ignorance before we went shopping... I hate shopping.

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