Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Baby did a bad bad thing....

Well from the last thing I wrote in here somewhere (being new means you have no idea where things are), things have changed on the laptop front. After writing some good things about Ubuntu I stumbled across some articles on Suse floating around the 'net and up pops the thought, "perhaps I didn't give it a proper go". Dangerous thought, very dangerous. After some deliberation it was probably a good idea to stick with what I had. So, off to the gym for some torture... erm... exercise. 2 hours later, sat in the bar trying to accumulate some fluids, an apprehensive looking wife says "we need to call at tescos on the way home"... I hate shopping.

Off we trot to tesco and I meander through the magazines section, Ooo, wonder if he'll be any good as bond? Nice tackle... fishing magazines, not that I do. No patience. New rebreather? How could I justify that to the tax man? Anyway, my gaze lands on Linux Format Magazine, hmmm, not seen that before. So I wander around the supermarket, head in the mag, following my wife... could have been anybody's wife. Suse 10.1 plus bits on the free DVD. Ati drivers too. The Ati drivers on my laptop never quite worked properly before (apart from under XP). I'm taking this the distance, to the checkout at once my good woman... well after an hour of browsing just about every aisle in the place.

Home at last, check mail, make tea, stick the madras in the oven and read the mag. The DVD is shinning there, and I'm a magpie. I lost the fight and stuck it into the DVD drive, install the ATI drivers and managed to break Ubuntu. Back to the prompt, X11 xorg copied, reboot and back in. Wonder if Suse would be better? Back into the thought danger zone. Backed up some files to the server (missing the mail file and some other bits DOH!). It's 11:30pm and I started to install Suse. What a good idea that was! 00:30am, still installing and what time do I have to get up? Oh right, that will be 6am then. 01:30am and installed. Don't know if it works, don't care, need sleep. There was a fight this morning with the alarm clock. Why why why can't I leave things alone!?!

Ok, so now I'm up, at work and struggling, this klix coffee would strip paint faster than brake fluid and I'm drinking pints of it, it's easier to write this than debug some of this PL/SQL. I brought in old faithful too and we have a lack of power outputs here and something about HSE and wires across office floors? Silly rule!. Suse is up and running again, on the main laptop this time (faster and newer than the one I tried it on last time). But.... it's a marvel chipset Netgear wireless and Suse no likey likey, connect to the internet it says, download something to fix it... hmmm, I'd like to see that one, no hard wires here, no phone sockets either, and to top it all off, I can't find my usb memory thing. Bugger. I wonder if the ati is recognised in 3D mode thing? Ah, direct = no. Isn't this where I was with Ubuntu only way behind? Click click click, and into some Yast configuration thing. Reboot and lo and behold, Direct = Yes, glxgear throwing out good performance. Still no network.

The laptop is a pentium IV, 2.5ghz, gig of ram (128 shared with ati), 60gb hard disk. It wasn't sluggish and ran XP quickly (when first installed, add the spyware, bugware, wifeware and that did bring it down a little) but it seems to run a tad sluggish with Suse, it wasn't exactly going to win speed awards with Ubuntu either but I heard somewhere that you can tweak this thing more than Ubuntu? It seems to take an age to open anything, nice splash screens though. Have I done a bad thing installing this? I guess it's a wait and see but I don't give up easily... I'll get it working by hook or crook, any tips for adding a nitros kit are very welcome! Oh, at the request of her that must be obeyed, it's running gnome not kde (can you install both and run one for one user and tuther for tuther?) Suse looks nice though, if only I had some dilithium crystals, a phaser and sonic screwdriver. We have ne power Jim!

It's all my wife's fault, I was happy Ubuntuing in Ubuntu ignorance before we went shopping... I hate shopping.

More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: KDE 18.08, Usability & Productivity and More

  • KDE Team Announces Major Improvements in Upcoming KDE 18.08 Release
    The developers of Linux’s KDE suite have announced a major slew of updates set to be included in the upcoming KDE 18.08, set for an August 2018 release. Details for these updates revolve around a range of new features and overall polish for the core KDE apps including Gwenview, Spectacle, Konsole, and Dolphin, as well as focusing on the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.14 update due in October. Due to KDE’s open-source nature, the devs also have a site up for people interested in getting involved, whether its simple bug reporting or actually being hands-on with the development using C++, Qt, and CMake. You can read more about their community program at KDE – Get Involved.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 28
    Here’s another big week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative. We’re getting ready for the release of KDE Applications 18.08–the second of our three yearly Applications releases. As the numbers in the version suggest, it will be released in August of 2018, about a month from now. As such, there’s been a lot of focus on new features and polish for core KDE apps such as Dolphin, Gwenview, Konsole, and Spectacle. We’re also ramping up our work for KDE Plasma 5.14, which is scheduled for release in October.
  • I’ve built a box
    This is not the typical post I use to write (which is usually about what I do at work, often related to GNOME, so if you’re not interested, just skip it…). But a couple of months ago I did something different that I still want to write about. That thing was a wooden box (sorry if you were expecting a Gavin Box) that I was asked to carve by my brother for his wedding, to be used for carrying the wedding rings. The wedding had a Game of Thrones’s theme (there was not blood in it though, if you’re wondering), so naturally my brother wanted some of that in the box. Thus, my initial idea was to just buy a box and carve something to do with GoT and include their names. Something like this, as my brother sent me for inspiration.
  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC18 Developer Center BoF Part 3: Challenges
    Currently, the Developer Center infrastructure and documentation suffers from low to non-existing maintenance. It’s a sign we need to take serious. Do we need lower the barrier to contributing to the developer documentation? What can we do to make the infrastructure easier to maintain? The underlying issue here likely also ties into why we now see new GNOME documentation hosted on other websites by different maintainers powered by different underlying technologies. I think this challenge needs both thinking from a technical point of view (how we might support editing multi-language documentation and auto-generated documentation) and an organizational point of view (assigning maintainership, reviewing our docs, aligning visions).

Programming: Persepolis, Microsoft EEE, Apache Subversion 1.10.2, SPAKE2 In Golang, AMD AOCC 1.2.1

  • Persepolis Download Manager: Impressive Python frontend for aria2
    Persepolis Download Manager is a handy open source download manager written in Python and PyQt. It’s a graphical frontend for aria2 aiming to make downloads both easier and faster. This software project commenced development in 2015 with the first release in July 2016. While it was initially only a simple graphical user interface, the software has seen some pretty hefty development since then with a whole raft of additional functionality added, improvements to the user interface, and cross-platform support.
  • Microsoft Visual Studio Code replumbed for better Python taming [Ed: Embrace and extend. Microsoft is trying to push developers of FOSS over to their proprietary IDE that puts spying inside compiled code.]
  • What’s new in Apache Subversion 1.10.2?
    I couldn’t believe if you are unaware of the Apache Subversion. It is an Enterprise-class centralized version control founded in 2000 by CollabNet Inc. One of the most successful opensource project in past many years. Mostly all the opensource projects and enterprise source code are on subversion. It has the rich community of developers and users who are continuously improving subversion.
  • SPAKE2 In Golang: Journey to Cryptoland begins
    Before I can go to detail I should tell why/how I came to implementing SPAKE2 in Golang. Story starts a couple of month back when I started contributing to *magic-wormhole.rs*, a Rust port of original Python project of magic-wormhole. You can read this LWN article to understand more about what magic-wormhole is. During contribution my friend Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan said to me that I should try to port the magic-wormhole to Golang. I was not a expert Go programmer but had understanding of language basics and thought why not use it to improve my language understanding. And this is where it all started.
  • AMD AOCC 1.2.1 Compiler Flings Flang Fixes
    AMD released a minor update to their AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler. AOCC is the company's downstream of LLVM/Clang with optimizations for their Zen CPU microarchitecture with compiler optimizations/improvements before they work their way into upstream LLVM. AOCC is the replacement for AMD's Open64 compiler used years ago with earlier micro-architectures.

Exclusive: Why open source is critical to software development

Recently I had the opportunity to sit down with Pivotal APJ head of platform architecture Lawrence Crowther and discuss the importance of Open-source and cloud. Firstly, can you tell me a bit more about Pivotal and its cloud platform? Pivotal’s original mission was to transform the way the world builds software. Now our mission is to transform the way the world runs software, too, through a combination of methodology and technology. Whether we are helping clients change their culture towards product development or managing platforms, we use the same agile principles in both cases, such as Extreme Programming and the Lean Startup approach. This is often a radical shift for companies to embrace so we partner with them for a “learn by doing” approach. We believe that in order to support a fast development team who are iterating quickly and updating constantly, you need a different kind of platform. One that removes all barriers and lets you go from “concept to cash” quickly in a reliable, secure and safe way. You can build software as fast as you want but if it is not ending up in the hands of users it doesn't matter. Once Pivotal Cloud Foundry is up and running the cost of deploying applications and iterating on them becomes almost zero. This is because it takes away the details of infrastructure, middleware, dependencies, integrations, monitoring and more from the development team so they can focus on delivering value to the business over and over again. Read more

Linux 4.18 RC6 is Out

  • Linux 4.18-rc6
    So this was the week when the other shoe dropped ... The reason the two previous rc releases were so nice and small was that David hadn't sent me much networking fixes, and they came in this week. That said, it's not really a huge rc this week either, so it's all good. But the networking pull this week does mean that almost exactly half of the diff is core networking, network drivers, or networking documentation updates. The rest is other drivers (mostly gpu, but also scsi, nvma, pci, pinctrl..), some arch updates (arc, x86, nds32, powerpc), and "misc" (tooling, header files, some vm and fs noise). The small but nasty VM bug we had earlier did indeed get fixed last rc, but there was some 32-bit fallout from the fix, so rc5 still had issues. But I'm hopeful that rc6 _really_ fixed all the cases. Shortlog appended for people who want to just get an overview of the details, Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc6 Kernel Released With Many Networking Fixes, Other Regressions Resolved
    The sixth weekly test release of the Linux 4.18 kernel is now available for evaluation. Linux 4.18-rc6 is prior than the two previous weekly release candidates since those versions hadn't incorporated any big batch of networking fixes, which hit this week. So about half of the changes are networking changes in Linux 4.18-rc6 while the other half is a mix of driver and architecture updates along with other noise.