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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0r0

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Debian
  • Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0r0

    Parsix GNU/Linux is a live and installation DVD based on Debian. Our goal is to provide a ready to use and easy to install desktop and laptop optimized operating system based on Debian's testing branch and the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment. Users can easily install extra software packages from Parsix APT repositories. Our annual release cycle consists of two major and four minor versions. We have our own software repositories and build servers to build and provide all the necessary updates and missing features in Debian stable branch.

  • Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0r0 "Mumble" Officially Released, Based on Debian 8 "Jessie"

    The developers of the Parsix GNU/Linux project had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the final version of the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 (Mumble) operating system.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

     
  • 4 Excellent Free Books to Learn J

    The J programming language, developed in the early 1990s by Kenneth E. Iverson and Roger Hui, is an array programming language based primarily on APL (also by Iverson). It’s available on a wide variety of computers and operating systems. J is distinguished by its simple and consistent rules, a large set of built-in capabilities, powerful facilities for defining new operations, and a general and systematic treatment of arrays. The J system provides: an engine for executing J; various front ends that provide user interfaces to the J engine; a library, written in J, that provides an IDE (interactive development environment), numerous tools, utilities, demos, tutorials; and online documentation. J is a very terse array programming language, and is most suited to mathematical and statistical programming, especially when performing operations on matrices. It has also been used in extreme programming and network performance analysis.

  • First steps of sending alerts to Discord and others from syslog-ng: http() and Apprise

    A returning question I get is: “I see, that you can send alerts from syslog-ng to Slack and Telegram, but do you happen to support XYZ?” Replace XYZ with Discord and countless others. Up until recently, my regular answer has been: “Take a look at the Slack destination of syslog-ng, and based on that, you can add support for your favorite service”. Then I learned about Apprise, a notification library for Python, supporting dozens of different services. This blog is the first part of a series. It covers how to send log messages to Discord using the http() destination of syslog-ng and an initial try at using Apprise for alerting. The next part will show you a lot more flexible version of the Apprise integration: making fields configurable using templates and using a block to hide implementation details from the user. The Python code in these two blogs is sample code, provided to you for inspiration. They are not for production use, as among others, they lack error handling and reporting. If time and my Python knowledge permits, I might have a more production-ready code later on, that I plan to cover in a third blog.

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  • The First-Person Sequel and Roda Insights from the Lead Dev: an Exclusive Interview with Jeremy Evan

    Jeremy Evans is the lead developer of the Sequel database library, the Roda web toolkit, the Rodauth authentication framework, and many other Ruby libraries. He is the maintainer of Ruby ports for the OpenBSD operating system, and has contributed to CRuby and JRuby, as well as many popular Ruby libraries. We are happy to present a brand-new interview with Jeremy to our readers. Hope you enjoy it! [...] I have been contributing patches and bug reports occasionally to Ruby since 2009. However, I started to get more involved with Ruby in early 2019 when hearing about the direction for keyword arguments in Ruby 3. The original proposal for keyword arguments in Ruby 3 was for full separation, so that passing a hash to a method that accepts keywords would raise an error, but also that passing keywords (a hash without braces) to a method that accept an optional hash argument would also raise an error. I thought this proposal went too far, by breaking compatibility with Ruby code that did not use keyword arguments at all. I built a patch on top of the original proposal that was more backwards compatible. I ended up presenting this proposal with Yusuke Endoh at the developer meeting at RubyKaigi 2019. While waiting on a decision from Matz about keyword arguments, I started sending in patches to fix other Ruby bugs, and after quite a few patches, Endoh-san recommended I become a committer, and Matz approved.

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  • Using Subresource Integrity (SRI) in Vite with @small-tech/vite-plugin-sri
             

OOMKiller and httpd

How to set up httpd to survive when OOMKiller kills one of its children. In Copr, we have had a leaking process in our frontend. It is one route, which was leaking few megabytes. The route has a separate child process in httpd, so only one process has been leaking. We still did not identify the culprit, and in the meantime we had to fight with OOMKiller. Few megabytes here and there and the process was too big. And we run out of memory. OOMKiller came and killed the process (as it was the biggest one). Usually, you will not care. Httpd is killing its children periodically, and when one is killed, the master process starts new child immediately. But… Read more Also: In the trenches with Thomas Gleixner, real-time Linux kernel patch set

Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Focusrite is hostile to Linux, avoid if possible

Last year, I acquired a Focusrite Scarlett 4i4. The main purpose was to improve the quality of my live coding sessions, and also to allow me experiment with recording my own songs. It was a pain from the moment I plugged this card into my laptop, until now. As of today, I’m happy that I’m finally getting rid of it. Allow me to explain how much of a disaster their approach is. Most USB digital audio interfaces are compatible with industry standards – they’re class compliant. That means they advertise features, inputs, outputs, etc, using a standard USB protocol. Not Focusrite. Focusrite decided they didn’t like hardware buttons. So they removed them, and switched to software-controlled features. For some reason that I’m yet to understand, Focusrite decided they wouldn’t use any standard protocol to advertise these features. So they invented a proprietary protocol only to control these features. This protocol is only usable through their Focusrite Control software – which, as you might have guessed, is proprietary, and only runs on Windows and Mac. Focusrite decided they didn’t want their hardware to work on Linux, so not even a minimal documentation about routing was published. That makes it even harder for the heroes trying to reverse-engineer their cards. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to install Ubuntu Budgie 21.04

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu Budgie 21.04.

  • Using the /proc Filesystem to Examine Your Linux Inner Workings

    One of the greatest things about Linux is how much control you have over your system. You can edit whatever you want, and there’s so much that’s flexible and available to you. Additionally, Linux is very transparent – error messages are very clear, and it’s not hard to see the inner workings of your system. One of the best ways to see those inner workings is the “/proc” directory. Here we show you how to use the “/proc” directory to examine the inner workings of your Linux system.

  • Using systemd timers instead of /etc/cron entries

    Cron does the job it was written for. But this was years ago, and these days Kernels offer neat things like CPU quotas and memory limits. Cron has no means to use those – but other tools have. Additionally, newer tools provide dependencies, a proper configuration language (instead of hard-to-maintain bash lines), multiple triggers, randomized delays and real logging. Especially the last bit, real logging, is essential: Cron can forward log messages it thinks needs to be forwarded. But without real kernel backed process management (cgroups) there is no real way for Cron to see if a job is running or has finished, and what log lines belong to it. Systemd has all this – and thus it makes sense to create new recurrent jobs in Systemd and even migrate old ones sometimes.

  • How to deploy an NFS server in your data center for easy file sync - TechRepublic

    Data must be shared. This is especially so in a busy company, where employees are constantly working with data and files. When this is the case, you have to make sure the data and files are available to anyone who needs them. For that, you might don several hats to try and get everything to everyone. Or you could turn to those Linux servers in your data center. With the help of NFS, you could sync those directories from server to server or server to desktop, with ease. In just a few quick minutes you can get this done.

  • Install Firefox Browser 88 In Ubuntu / LinuxMint / CentOS | Tips On UNIX

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to download and install Mozilla Firefox 88 in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Linux Mint 20.1, and CentOS 8.1 / 7.x. Mozilla Firefox is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla foundation and generally utilized by thousands and thousands of individuals in their daily actions.

  • How To Install Samba on Debian 10 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Samba on Debian 10. For those of you who didn’t know, Samba allows you to share files and printers with other computers remotely, regardless of their operating system. It lets you access your desktop files from a laptop and share files with Windows and macOS users. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Samba on a Debian 10 (Buster).

  • 5 Tips To Use The Linux SS Command Like A Pro

    The ss command is a tool that is used for displaying network socket related information on a Linux system. The tool displays more detailed information that the netstat command which is used for displaying active socket connections. In this article we are going to explore some of the best ways to use the command for best results.

  • 3 Ways to Check Your Wi-Fi Password in Ubuntu

    Forgot your wireless access point password? Well, there are a few ways to find it out in Ubuntu.