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Android and Google Leftovers

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Android
Google
  • Facebook gives Android a kick in the byte code

    To improve the mobile performance of its social network, Facebook is enhancing Java bytecode on the Android platform with its Redex project, providing a pipeline for optimizing Android DEX (Dalvik Executable) files.

  • 13 of the best Android apps from September

    Coming off the back of the summer holidays always make September a busy month and this year it was no different.

    From useful spam fighting options arriving for Gmail to movie tracking and the launch of a huge repository of online tutorials across a range of subjects.

    We’ve sorted the wheat from the chaff and what follows is the best new and updated apps from September.

    All you need to do is clear a few minutes in your schedule and click your way through the list.

  • Google reveals new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio devices

    Google's Chromecast streaming media player has proven to be a popular item on Amazon, getting four star ratings and lots of positive comments from Amazon customers. Now Google has announced a brand new Chromecast, and also the new Chromecast Audio device.

  • Hands on: Google Pixel C convertible tablet

    It’s difficult to tell if the new Google Pixel C is a great idea, or an awful one. It feels like a greatest hits list of Windows 8 convertible failures. It’s a clamshell, and the tablet is connected to the keyboard via magnets. But to open it or close it, you have to pull it apart and reconnect it. You can also flip the tablet upright and stick the keyboard to the back of it, though it makes the tablet thicker and heavier than you may like. The entire converting process is messy. Google tries to cover it all up with a beautiful aluminum design and smooth hinges that adjust angle easily. But will it be fun to use every day? I’m not so sure.

  • Google announces the LG Nexus 5X and Huawei Nexus 6P; pre-orders start today

    Google has officially taken the wraps off its new flagship smartphone lineup. In keeping with the current smartphone release trends, Google is announcing two devices today: the Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P. The 5X is made by LG, and the 6P is made by Huawei. The Nexus 5X starts at $379, and the 6P starts at $499, and both phones will ship later this month. Pricing for other territories is starting to dribble in—the Nexus 5X and 6P will begin at £339 and £449 respectively in the UK—but we'll update the article with more complete information as it's made available.

  • Google announces the new Chromecast and Chromecast Audio

    The new Chromecast has a disk-like design, a departure from the original's dongle construction. Its improved internals should also make streaming easier and faster. Now featuring three antennas, it supports 5GHz 802.11ac Wi-Fi for faster connectivity and heavier formats like 1080p. While the new Chromecast handles video and game streaming, the Chromecast Audio device will handle streaming music or podcasts. The new Chromecast plugs into a device with HDMI; Audio uses both optical and headphone jacks to plug into speakers.

  • Fairphone launches v2 of it conflict-free, upgradeable smartphone

    There's a company offering a repairable and upgradable smartphone out there and Jack Wallen believe it is just what the world needs. Read on to see if you agree.

More in Tux Machines

Announcing Oracle Linux 9 general availability

Oracle is pleased to announce Oracle Linux 9 general availability for Intel-64/AMD-64 (x86_64) and Arm (aarch64). This release includes the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 7 (UEK R7), also generally available today, along with the Red Hat Compatible Kernel (RHCK). Read more

Running the Steam Deck’s OS in a virtual machine using QEMU

The Steam Deck is a handheld gaming computer that runs a Linux-based operating system called SteamOS. The machine comes with SteamOS 3 (code name “holo”), which is in turn based on Arch Linux. Although there is no SteamOS 3 installer for a generic PC (yet), it is very easy to install on a virtual machine using QEMU. This post explains how to do it. The goal of this VM is not to play games (you can already install Steam on your computer after all) but to use SteamOS in desktop mode. The Gamescope mode (the console-like interface you normally see when you use the machine) requires additional development to make it work with QEMU and will not work with these instructions. A SteamOS VM can be useful for debugging, development, and generally playing and tinkering with the OS without risking breaking the Steam Deck. Running the SteamOS desktop in a virtual machine only requires QEMU and the OVMF UEFI firmware and should work in any relatively recent distribution. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Dead Rising 1 and 2 Make it as Steam Deck Verified Titles

    But not just Dead Rising! Valve has progressed in testing more games and we are at more than 3700 games validated (3719 games to be precise at the time of publication) on the Steam Deck – in two categories...

  • Linux is more popular than ever, thanks to Valve’s Steam Deck | PCGamesN

    The Steam Deck is undeniably a popular handheld gaming PC, and its street cred is helping Linux grab a larger slice of the market pie. While Windows 10 still reigns supreme within the operating system scene, more Steam users than ever are playing games on versions of the Unix-like OS.

  • Behind open DORS – Conference organizers share their thoughts on Canonical, Ubuntu, snaps, and open-source | Ubuntu

    A Linux conference almost as old as Linux itself. In mid-May, DORS/CLUC hosted its 29th event at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing in Zagreb, Croatia. With a long history of participation and contribution to open source communities, Canonical was one of the sponsors at the conference, with a busy schedule that included a presentation on snaps, an Ask Me Anything (AMA) session, and several interviews. Typically, at conference events, the conference presenters (and attendees) are the ones who get interviewed. This time, we decided to add a spin. I interviewed the event’s organizers. For a good hour and half, I spoke to Svebor Prstacic, the president of HrOpen and Vedran Lebo, the co-chair of the conference and president of HULK (an aptly acronymized organization that translates to The Croatian Linux Users Association). We discussed the origins of DORS, the value and importance of Linux and open source, the relation with Canonical, and the future.

  • KDE Dev-Vlog 4: Too Much Spectacle! – Felix Ernst

    Sometimes it is the smallest thing that makes the biggest difference for our users. This video shows the cause and the thoughts behind such a small change on a small application.

  • Brenda is classic automata nightmare fuel | Arduino Blog

    Art is a strange thing. Sometimes its purpose is purely aesthetic. Sometimes it makes a statement. And sometimes it exists to disturb. Kinetic art is no different and some robots fall into this category. Graham Asker’s art elicits pondering on the relationship between humans and robots, as well as the relationships between different robots. But as Brenda, a classical-style automaton, demonstrates, Asker’s art can also induce nightmares. Brenda and her companion Brian are strange, bodiless robots designed to mimic the aesthetics of automatons from myth and history. Each robot is a construction of beautiful brass, mechanical joints, linkages, and cables. Servos hidden inside the bases of the robots actuate the various joints, giving Brenda and Brian the ability to emote. Most of their “facial” movement is in their eyes. Lifelike eyeballs look around from within heavy eyelids, while pivoting eyebrows help to convey expressions.

Free, Libre, and Open Source Software/Events