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It's Official: 'To Google' Is Grammatically Correct

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Google

Everyone seems to be content with making "google" a generic term except the search company that invented the name. "To google" has caught on to such a degree that Merriam-Webster decided to include it as a transitive verb in the upcoming new edition of its dictionary. However, Google is concerned that its name will lose specificity, with people using it to describe any search process.

The minute he heard someone use "I googled him" in a sentence, Robert Beard, president of Lexiteria, which publishes alphaDictionary.com, knew the word was likely to be a keeper.

"It's a very good sign," he told TechNewsWorld, "when a word assumes its own characteristics. When it expands or contracts in meaning, for instance, it has a good chance of staying in our vocabulary."

The ultimate -- and official -- indication that a word has reached that level of acceptance, of course, is its inclusion in a respected dictionary. That has just happened with "google."

It is now grammatically correct to use "google" as a transitive verb -- lower case "g" -- according to the latest edition of the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Full Story at LinuxInsider.

I don't think Google should

I don't think Google should be concerned that their name will lose specificity. They should even be flattered and excited about the fact that their company's name has become a household term. I don't think I will say "I googled" something if I used a different search engine. But I can't speak for everyone of course. This is actually another boost for the company - not that they need any more boosting. Acquiring the term "google" as part of the language was inevitable; Americans are known for their love to play with words.

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