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Why is Firefox So Darn Popular?

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Moz/FF

Recently, I have been pondering why is Firefox so darn popular? This is a question that I honestly ask myself sometimes, often while browsing the web from within the browser itself. The real trick is that there are so many different ways to answer this.

To be honest, I believe it has a lot to do with value accompanied by perception. The value is obvious to any one person who has used Firefox for more than a few days. It's stable and has proven to be a viable alternative to its archrival, Internet Explorer.

When considering how it handles downloads, the absence of ActiveX, the total lack of Firefox users complaining about excessive spyware infestations and even the fact that the browser has allowed for such great extensions to be created by motivated Firefox users is an exciting achievement.

Another side of it likely comes from the grassroots end of the web browser itself.

Full Story.

linked to server down

Link to full story is down.

re: link down

Augh, bummer. Maybe they'll be back up tomorrow.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

why Firefox?

I still don't really see what the difference is between Mozilla and Firefox that made people switch from this article.

The thing I like about Firefox is that it is so stable. They also fixed a lot of the annoying little things that Mozilla/Netscape screwed up all the time.

Probably for most people it is the interface design and the growing problem with spyware on Windows that gets people excited about Firefox while they did not get so excited about Mozilla.

The ironic thing is that it took so long for a Gecko based browser to get any market share back. Microsoft spent so little time on Internet Explorer and completely stopped development on it for 5 years and it wasn't until just recently that Firefox became popular. And if Internet Explorer didn't have such bad security, then there never would have been a mass move to Firefox.

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