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today's leftovers

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  • KNewPasswordWidget lands in KWidgetsAddons

    A new widget called KNewPasswordWidget has been added to the KWidgetsAddons framework, starting from 5.16. I decided to create this widget because sometimes you cannot just use KNewPasswordDialog to ask the users for a new password. This is the case when you need to add further options to the same dialog. This widget is meant to be easily embedded in such a custom password dialog, without having to code it from scratch.

  • Handing over the reins

    As some of you might know, I started the application Cantor in KDEedu a couple of years ago, since I didn’t want to rely on comercial computer algebra systems during my studies, and because all the free alternatives seemed to lack a decent graphical interface. Since then Cantor has grown to support all kinds of different mathematical languages due to numerous contributors from all over the world.

  • fwupd and DFU

    Once all this new code has settled down I’m going to be re-emailing a lot of the vendors who were unwilling to write vendor-specific code in fwupd. I’m trying to make the barrier to automatic updates on Linux as low as possible.

  • PaperTrail - Powered by IBM Watson

    On the final semester of my MSc program at Columbia SEAS, I was lucky enough to be able to attend a seminar course taught by Alfio Gliozzo entitled Q&A with IBM Watson. A significant part of the course is dedicated to learning how to leverage the services and resources available on the Watson Developer Cloud. This post describes the course project my team developed, the PaperTrail application.

  • Google’s new ‘Wallpaper Art’ app puts beautiful artwork on your Chromebook

    Google has many side initiatives, and one of them is the Cultural Institute that digitizes works of art from museums and archives around the world and puts them online.

    Today, their Art Project released an app for Chrome OS that updates the wallpaper of your device to a different piece of art from their collection every day. Expect “masterpieces ranging from Van Gogh and Monet, all the way to contemporary works from street artists around the world,” according to Chrome evangelist François Beaufort in announcement post. If today’s piece doesn’t jive with your artistic taste, you can skip to the next wallpaper in the app.

  • Google Wallpaper Art app turns your Chromebook into an art gallery

    Chromebooks have been red hot sellers on Amazon for some time now. But if you're someone who has had a boring desktop on your Chromebook, you can now spice it up with Google's new Wallpaper Art app. The app will refresh artwork every day and features many different wallpapers from noted artists from the past and present.

  • Calculate 15 Scratch KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Netrunner 2015.11 Rolling Screenshot Tour
  • Blogging, Podcasting, or Video?

    While I was initially attracted to the notion of sharing some of these thoughts in an audio format, I have decided to focus instead more on writing. This was partially informed by my back of the napkin research, but also in thinking about how we best present thoughts.

  • Bad Voltage Episode 54 Has Been Released

    Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews.

  • Almost a beta

    Yet another 200+ lines of updates in the ChangeLog.txt of slackware-current. It’s obvious that Pat has been watching the LinuxQuestions threads closely. And we are again very bleeding edge, with the Gnu Compiler Collection 5.2.0!

  • Stock in Motion: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fil Ltd Decreased Stake in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) by $10.36 Million as Shares Declined
  • Red Hat, Inc. Price Target Update

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): 17 Analyst have given the stock of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) a near short term price target of $85.06. The standard deviation reading, which is a measure by which the stock price is expected to swing away from the mean estimate, is at $5.09. The higher price target estimate is at $92 while the lower price estimates are fixed at $72.

  • Robolinux 8.2 Raptor LXDE Edition (Debian Based OS With Support For Windows Apps) Has Been Released
  • Your donations at work

    I’ve just published the most recent Community Donations Report highlighting where donations made to the Ubuntu community have been used by members of that community to promote and improve Ubuntu. In this report I’ve included links to write-ups detailing how those funds were put to use.

  • Linux AIO: Ubuntu 15.10 available

    Linux AIO is a project to package multiple flavours of a distribution in one ISO within a DVD size limit. Users can try each flavour live or install on their systems. In essence the difference lies mostly in the desktop environments. This is an invaluable source of distributions for distro hoppers. Note that there are issues, some of which are unresolved due to distro dependencies. However, for most of it, the stuff works.

  • NAS boxes double as media players, run Linux plus Android

    Qnap’s TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 NAS devices run both Linux and Android on a dual-core ARM SoC, and offers private cloud and media player capabilities.

    Qnap is positioning the single HDD-bay TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 at the bottom of its Home NAS line below the faster, dual-bay TS-231 and the higher-end, dual-bay TS-251 launched in 2014. Like these systems, the new TAS devices are mini-towers and run Qnap’s Linux-based NAS OS. In addition, Qnap claims the devices are the first home network-attached storage devices that also run Android.

  • H3-OLinuXino fresh out of reflow oven – our first quad core OSHW Linux SBC prototypes are ready

    Now these first prototypes will be put on heavy testing before we run the board in production. We want to see if they will be able to run Linux yet or just Android.

  • Dangerous Exploit found in Chrome for Android

    A rather critical Exploit has been uncovered in Google's own 'Chrome for Android' app which allows malicious programs to be installed without user intervention.

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: RenderDoc, Mesa, and Vulkan

  • RenderDoc 1.17 Released For This Leading Open-Source Graphics Debugging Tool - Phoronix

    RenderDoc 1.17 released this week as the newest version of this leading cross-platform, cross-API graphics debugging utility. RendertDoc 1.17 continues to be a gem for developers working with Vulkan and OpenGL along with Direct3D 11/12. RenderDoc as the MIT-licensed frame-capture-based graphics debugger works extremely well for game/engine developers as well as GPU driver developers in working through different issues.

  • DMA-BUF Feedback Support For Wayland Lands In Mesa 22.0's EGL Code - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa on Black Friday was DMA-BUF Feedback support within the EGL code as another important step forward for Wayland. Introduced earlier this week was Wayland Protocols 1.24 and the primary addition to that collection of protocols is DMA-BUF feedback support. The DMA-BUF "feedback" support is important for Wayland multi-GPU systems where needing to know more information about the GPU device used by the compositor and for being able to efficiently exchange buffers between the secondary and primary GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Finally Adds VK_KHR_synchronization2 Support - Phoronix

    The Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has added support for the prominent VK_KHR_synchronization2 extension introduced earlier this year. Added back in February with Vulkan 1.2.170 was VK_KHR_synchronization2 for simplifying the core synchronization APIs of this industry-standard graphics API. VK_KHR_synchronization2 makes Vulkan synchronization handling easier to deal with Those interested in the changes with the "synchronization2" revision can see this Khronos blog post going over the Vulkan synchronization handling in detail along with the changes from this extension.

Kernel: Futex2, Fixes, and Other New Features for Linux 5.16

  • Futex2 Brings Linux Gaming To The Next Level - Invidious

    Futex2 has been a work in progress by Valve and collabora for a very long time and it seems like it's finally going to make it's way into the kernel.

  • Patch out for Alder Lake Linux bug that reminds of the Windows 11 Ryzen CPPC issue - Neowin

    Linux boss Linus Torvalds merged earlier today several important patches for Intel CPU generally related to performance states (P-states) on Linux.

  • Linux 5.16 Merges Fix For One Of The Intel Alder Lake Issues - Phoronix

    Merged this Friday afternoon into the Linux 5.16 development kernel is fixing a performance issue affecting some Intel Alder Lake motherboards. The fix merged a short time ago is the item previously covered within Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems. As explained in that prior article, TurboBoost Max 3.0 / ITMT (Turbo Boost Max Technology) code within the kernel isn't being enabled for some systems, particularly if overclocking or even any memory XMP / optimal settings. The ASUS Z690 board I've been primarily using for the i9-12900K was affected as are numerous other boards. I've also heard reports of some motherboards running purely stock are even having this issue.

  • Intel Preparing USI Stylus Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel open-source driver engineers have been working on USI stylus support for the Linux kernel. The Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) aims to offer interoperability of active styluses across touchscreen devices. The Universal Stylus Initiative has a goal of allowing all styluses that comply with USI to work across devices. USI is backed by the likes of Google who wants to see USI working uniformally across Chromebooks, Dell and other hardware vendors, Intel is also involved and leading the upstream Linux support patches, and peripheral vendors like Logitech are also supporting the standard. Other big names like Wacom, Samsung, and many other players from desktop to laptops to mobile.

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more