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Wine Announcement

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Software

The Wine development release 1.8-rc1 is now available.

This is the first release candidate for the upcoming Wine 1.8. Please
give this release a good testing to help us make 1.8 as good as
possible.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
- Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.

The source is available from the following locations:

http://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/1.8/wine-1.8-rc1.tar.bz2
http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/1.8/wine-1.8-rc1.tar.bz2

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • #28 PrintScrn · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from January 21 to January 28.

  • Implementing a MIME database in XXXX

    Recently, I have been working on implementing a parser for media types (commonly called MIME types) and a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice-versa. I thought this would be an interesting module to blog about, given that it’s only about 250 lines of code, does something useful and interesting, and demonstrates a few interesting xxxx concepts. The format for media types is more-or-less defined by RFC 2045, specifically section 5.1. The specification is not great. The grammar shown here is copied and pasted from parts of larger grammars in older RFCs, RFCs which are equally poorly defined. For example, the quoted-string nonterminal is never defined here, but instead comes from RFC 822, which defines it but also states that it can be “folded”, which technically makes the following a valid Media Type:

    text/plain;charset="hello
     world"
    
    Or so I would presume, but the qtext terminal “cannot include CR”, which is the mechanism by which folding is performed in the first place, and… bleh. Let’s just implement a “reasonable subset” of the spec instead and side-step the whole folding issue.1 This post will first cover parsing media types, then address our second goal: providing a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice versa.

  • gst-editing-services compiled in OE

    I discovered that 'gst-editing-services' is another dependency of Pitivi, added to these: https://bkhome.org/news/202201/more-dependencies-for-pitivi-video-editor.html There is no recipe in OE, so I attempted to compile it on the host system. Stuffed around for about 3 hours, unable to compile, ninja is doing something stupid.

  • More dependencies for Pitivi video editor

    This morning I posted about a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, "revision 7": https://bkhome.org/news/202201/what-to-expect-in-the-next-release-of-easyos.html This included bumped gstreamer version, suitable to run Pitivi.

  • Wasmer 2.2 Bringing Its WebAssembly "Singlepass" Compiler To AArch64 - Phoronix

    Wasmer 2.2-rc1 is out today as the WebAssembly run-tme to "run any code on any client" with its broad platform coverage and allowing numerous programming languages from Rust to PHP to C# being able to be compiled into WebAssembly and then running on any OS or embedded into other languages for execution. Wasmer continues as one of the leading open-source WebAssembly runtimes with a diverse feature-set. Its project site at Wasmer.io talks up Wasmer for use from "supercharged blockchain infrastructure" to "portable ML/AI applications". Buzzwords aside, Wasmer has been a very interesting WebAssembly open-source project.

  • Alternatives to Visual Basic

    This is a list of free/libre open source software (FLOSS) alternatives to Visual Basic (part of Microsoft Visual Studio) computer programming platform. If your school is still teaching VB 6, or if you now use Ubuntu for programming classroom, we strongly suggest you to switch to either one of these alternatives. With these, one can create computer programs visually by drag and drop as well as coding just like what one can do with VB.

Graphics: DXVK-NVAPI, Wayland, Resizable BAR

  • DXVK-NVAPI 0.5.2 Released With Entry Points For NVIDIA PhysX - Phoronix

    DXVK-NVAPI as the open-source project implementing support for NVIDIA's NVAPI within the realm of DXVK is out with a new release, which is exciting for NVIDIA Linux gamers. DXVK-NVAPI is an important project for NVIDIA Linux gamers enjoying Valve's Steam Play (Proton) or outside of it as well if using DXVK otherwise. DXVK-NVAPI provides an NVAPI library implementation that can be used by the Windows games that make use of this NVIDIA API. DXVK-NVAPI is already used for Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS), NVAPI D3D11 extensions, and other features.

  • Wayland Testing New Protocol Extension To Handle Session Locking - Phoronix

    Wayland Protocols 1.25 was released today as the collection of testing and stable Wayland protocols. New to Wayland Protocols 1.25 is the session-lock-v1 protocol being experimental and responsible to handle session locking. The session-lock-v1 protocol is the main addition of Wayland Protocols 1.25 and allows for privileged Wayland clients to lock the session and display arbitrary graphics while in the locked mode. That authenticated client is responsible for handling user authentication and interfacing with the compositor for disabling the session lock when appropriate.

  • Intel Preparing Resizable BAR Support For Their Arc Graphics On Linux - Phoronix

    Ahead of the Intel Arc "Alchemist" graphics cards shipping this year, Intel's open-source developers have continued ironing out the Linux driver support. The most recent kernel patches are for getting their Resizable BAR "ReBAR" support in order. Sent out this week were a set of patches for small BAR recovery support for the Intel kernel graphics driver on Linux.

Kubernetes Leftovers

  • How to Tackle the Cloud Native Trends of 2022 | SUSE Communities

    At SUSE, we partner with several top-notch managed service providers to deliver the whole enterprise package — our open, interoperable offerings backed by their proven ops teams. We help MSPs more easily and securely deliver objectives despite the increasing complexity of the cloud and Kubernetes, while they help our enterprises get up and stay up, running faster, while cutting costs. We provide that much needed abstraction layer so they can focus on your enterprise modernizing securely.

  • Securing Kubernetes at the Infrastructure Level

    Infrastructure security is important to get right so that attacks can be prevented—or, in the case of a successful attack, damage can be minimized. It is especially important in a Kubernetes environment because, by default, a large number of Kubernetes configurations are not secure. Securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level requires a combination of host hardening, cluster hardening and network security. [...] I have listed 10 best practices for securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level. While this is certainly not an exhaustive list by any means, it should give you the foundation to make a good start. I recommend reading chapter two of Kubernetes security and observability: A holistic approach to securing containers and cloud-native applications, an O’Reilly book I co-authored, to learn about these best practices in further detail and to discover additional best practices for infrastructure security.

  • Should You Learn Kubernetes? – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes has seen a surge of adoption over the past few years as companies have pivoted towards containers and cloud-native deployment methods. The platform’s become the leading orchestration solution for running containers in production. This means people who are skilled in using and managing Kubernetes clusters are now in-demand across the industry. In this article, we’ll look at whether you should learn Kubernetes based on your current role and future objectives. If you’re not being tasked with managing a cluster, the decision ultimately comes down to the skill set you want to acquire and the areas you might move into down the line.

  • Declarative vs Imperative Kubernetes Object Management – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes is usually described as a declarative system. Most of the time you work with YAML that defines what the end state of the system should look like. Kubernetes supports imperative APIs too though, where you issue a command and get an immediate output. In this article, we’ll explore the differences between these two forms of object management. The chances are you’ve already used both even if you don’t recognize the terms.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (graphicsmagick), Fedora (grafana), Mageia (aom and roundcubemail), openSUSE (log4j and qemu), Oracle (parfait:0.5), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Slackware (expat), SUSE (containerd, docker, log4j, and strongswan), and Ubuntu (cpio, shadow, and webkit2gtk).

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 202 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 202. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
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      (Closes: #1004312)
    * Drop a reference in the manual page which claims the ability to compare
      non-existent files on the command-line. This has not been possible since
      version 32 which was released in September 2015. (Closes: #1004182)
    * Add experimental support for incremental output support with a timeout.
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      fixed/strict timeout due to implementation issues.)
      (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#301)
    * Don't return with an exit code of 0 if we encounter device file such as
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    * Correct a "recompile" typo.
    
    [ Sergei Trofimovich ]
    * Fix/update whitespace for Black 21.12.

  • CISA Adds Eight Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog | CISA

    CISA has added eight new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence that threat actors are actively exploiting the vulnerabilities listed in the table below. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors of all types and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise.