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today's leftovers

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  • Why ChromeOS Tops Linux, Mac and Windows

    Much like mishandling a sharp stick, any operating system that easily allows you to access root or super user powers is potentially dangerous. In 2015, the single biggest threat to your computer's security is sitting at your desk, typing on your keyboard. This is why more people than ever are gravitating towards tablets, smart phones and yes, Chromebooks as their main computing device.

    All of these devices come locked down so that accessing something dangerous to that device is much more difficult to do. Whether you run rm -r / on a Mac or on Linux, or install something terrible on Windows – there are simply too many opportunities for the less tech savvy to destroy their operating system installation.

  • 5 Use Cases for Linux Virtual Desktops

    Many people liked the idea of running a Linux desktop; but in reality, when asked if Linux desktops were running on their physical systems, the answer was also No. Now, however, it seems like the tide has turned and more enterprises are starting to run Linux desktops. That means they're looking for a more secure and manageable way to deal with them.

  • Netrunner 17 Linux OS Launches with Gorgeous KDE Plasma 5.4.3 Desktop

    On November 23, the Netrunner Team was happy to announce the final release and immediate availability for download of the Netrunner 17 GNU/Linux operating system, dubbed Horizon.

  • The Pebble that Can Protect Your Home Network From Cyber Perils

    Yossi adds that the device features the capacity to know whenever your TV is recording your voice even if it is switched off and when it uploads the information to the cloud.

    "We all lock our front doors and yet our devices are wide open", explains Yossi Atias, Dojo-Labs' CEO and cofounder.

    Security systems devoted to the Internet of Things are becoming more common and more sophisticated.

    The number of connected devices now exceeds 4 billion, according to Gartner, and is expected to surge to 6 billion in 2016. The proliferation of Wi-Fi-enabled things-from baby monitors to smart locks-makes the home vulnerable to cyber threats, of which the Federal Bureau of Investigation recently issued a warning. The device is created to monitor the behavior of each device that is connected to your home network and help ensure your privacy. And it grows more intelligent with each new gadget and intrusion.

  • Snowdrift.coop Joins OSI as Newest Affiliate Member

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), recognized globally for promoting and protecting open source software and development communities, announced today the affiliate membership of Snowdrift.coop. Snowdrift.coop is building a sustainable funding platform for freely-licensed works. Unlike the one-to-one matching used in traditional fundraising, Snowdrift.coop uses a many-to-many matching pledge that creates a network effect (like the internet itself) so that each donation and even projects reinforce one another. A fundamental difference between Snowdrift.coop and one-time fundraising campaigns that help projects get started is that Snowdrift.coop pays out monthly to provide sustainability for ongoing work.

  • Mirantis and FusionStorm Team on OpenStack Appliances

    Mirantis, which is already well-known for its laser focus on the OpenStack cloud computing platform, has delivered a flurry of announcements this week. Earlier, we covered the news that its Fuel toolset has become an official OpenStack component under the project's "big tent" organizational policy. Fuel has been successfully used to deploy OpenStack in environments ranging from personal proof-of-concept micro-clouds to production infrastructures composed of hundreds of nodes running tens of thousands of instances.

More in Tux Machines

Darktable 3.2 Open-Source RAW Image Editor Released with Major New Features

Darktable 3.2.1 is now available and it’s the first major update to the application since the introduction of the 3.0 series. If you’re asking, there wasn’t a 3.2.0 release, nor a 3.1 release. The development team jumped straight to the 3.2.1 version number from version 3.0.2, which you’re probably using right now on your GNU/Linux distribution, because of a last minute bug in the 3.2.0 release. But don’t let the version number fool you, because Darktable 3.2.1 is a massive update with lots of goodies for amateur and professional photographers alike. Highlights include support for up to 8K screen resolutions thanks to the complete rewrite of the Lighttable View and the revamped Filmstrip. Read more

Kernel: EULA, Linux 5.8 and Linux 5.9

  • A "Large Hardware Vendor" Wants A EULA Displayed For Firmware Updates On Linux

    The open-source Fwupd firmware updating utility paired with LVFS as the Linux Vendor Firmware Service has seen explosive growth for vastly improving the BIOS/firmware updating experience on Linux. Many major hardware vendors distribute their firmware updates on LVFS for consumption by Fwupd and more than 17 million firmware files have been served. Now though there is a new "large hardware vendor" willing to distribute their firmware updates this way but they want a end-user license agreement (EULA) added.  Fwupd/LVFS lead developer Richard Hughes of Red Hat noted today that "A large hardware vendor wants to join the LVFS, but only on the agreement that every user has to agree to a English-only EULA text when deploying their firmware updates. This is the first vendor that's required this condition, and breaks all kinds of automated deployment." 

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  • Linux 5.8 released: Bootlin contributions

    Linux 5.8 was released recently. See our usual resources for a good coverage of the highlights of this new release: KernelNewbies page, LWN.net article on the first part of the merge window, LWN.net article on the second part of the merge window. On our side, we contributed a total of 155 commits to Linux 5.8, which makes Bootlin the 19th contributing company by number of commits according to Linux Kernel Patch Statistic. 

  • SD Times news digest: New Relic and Grafana Lab on open instrumentation, Atlassian TEAM Anywhere, and Linux 5.8 rc-1 released [Ed: No, Linux 5.8 rc-1 released ages ago]

    The Linux working group stated that 5.8 looks to be one of the project’s biggest releases of all time, including a lot of fundamental core work and cleanups, as well as filesystem work and driver updates.  Within the 5.8 merge window, about 20% of all the files in the kernel source repository have been modified.  In total, the release includes over 14k non-merge commits (over 15k counting merges), 800k new lines, and over 14 thousand files changed.

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  • Linux 5.9 HID Has Improvement For Faster Probe/Boot Time

    The HID changes for Linux 5.9 aren't too many but there are a few worth mentioning for improving input device support on Linux. 

  • XFS Is Packing Many Improvements With Linux 5.9

    The XFS file-system has many improvements ready for the Linux 5.9 kernel.  The main XFS feature pull was sent in on Friday for Linux 5.9 and includes a wealth of improvements for this mature file-system...

Beaker Browser – A P2P Browser for Web Hackers.

Beaker is a free and open-source web browser built to enable users to publish websites and web apps themselves directly from the browser without having to set up a separate web server or hosting their content with a 3rd party. To quote one of the project devs, it has been built to “to give users more control over the Web”. We’ve covered several projects based on similar technology (e.g. PeerTube) but this one has a little more icing on the cake. [...] The Dat protocol is favoured over HTTP for Beaker for 5 main reasons. It can sync archives from multiple sources; the URLs remain the same even when the archives can change hosts. All updates have checksums; changes are written to an append-only version log, and any archive can be hosted on any device. Although it uses Dat by default, Beaker supports connecting to traditional servers with HTTP so you can equally visit typical websites. Read more

Beaker Browser – A P2P Browser for Web Hackers.

Beaker is a free and open-source web browser built to enable users to publish websites and web apps themselves directly from the browser without having to set up a separate web server or hosting their content with a 3rd party. To quote one of the project devs, it has been built to “to give users more control over the Web”. We’ve covered several projects based on similar technology (e.g. PeerTube) but this one has a little more icing on the cake. [...] The Dat protocol is favoured over HTTP for Beaker for 5 main reasons. It can sync archives from multiple sources; the URLs remain the same even when the archives can change hosts. All updates have checksums; changes are written to an append-only version log, and any archive can be hosted on any device. Although it uses Dat by default, Beaker supports connecting to traditional servers with HTTP so you can equally visit typical websites. Read more