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The Site: first quarter report

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Site News

Today marks the anniversary of my first quarter year actually getting hits. I started a little website last July actually, but didn't do much with it. The main focus then was getting a server running using gentoo and logging the struggle. Later, I wanted a content management application that I could update easier and perhaps do some reviews and stories that might be interesting enough to get some reads. I looked around, tried several of the popular apps, and finally settled on one that I thought was the prettiest and easiest to use. That application was drupal. I've since revamped the look some and thanks to jrangles, I'm quite pleased with the look and feel. The drupal forum has been invaluable in helping with small glitches and added features.

I opened with a few links to stories on Feb. 04 and finally posted my first original article on Feb. 08. It got almost 2500 hits and I was quite pleased. My site has grown since to have received over 111,000 hits last month and have link exchanges with 6 other sites. One exchange was initiated by the other party recently and I've been approached by google to includes some ads. I've been slashdotted once and osnew'd once as well. Tho the site never went down, the traffic was too much for my small dsl pipe to handle. All I could do was watch the logs fly by. Smile Thanks to Slashdot, osnews, userlocal and all the others for carrying my stories.

I'm not aggressively promoting the site and rarely submit my news to other sites, with the exception of the PC-BSD story that I did submit to a few, but my articles have been linked to from some of the biggest sites around and I can't thank them enough. I couldn't be happier, unless I had a bigger pipe. Smile The biggest thanks goes out to pclinuxonline for their continued support for which I have no doubt I owe any success I've had.

Tied for first in that "biggest thanks" list is you the readers. Without your interest and visits, my site of course would be nothing. Thanks for visiting and reading my articles.

To date the site has had the following number of hits:

2005-05 16186
2005-04 111392
2005-03 67624
2005-02 8990

This doesn't not include the gallery for several reasons. The main one being it's a separate application not integrated with drupal. That's good tho because most of the hits come from links from my stories, with the exception of the KDE 3.4rc1 album that slashdot linked to instead of the article. April was a good month, because the community had two major releases in KDE 3.4 and Mandriva 2005 in that March/April timeframe. I struggle to find interesting topics each month, and those will be hard to follow.

Stories by other's are most welcome and are always posted (so far). I apologize for having to disable anonymous commenting, but I was getting slammed with spam posts. Speaking of folks messing with me, I was hacked once too.

Some may recall my site being down for about 10 or 12 hours around April 23. My restore efforts were hampered by having to go my real job right after it happened. Someone took advantage of a php vulnerability and corrupted the database. It was my own fault as I knew for days that a patch was available to close that security hole. I hesitated in hopes to wait for a day off from work in case the updates broke my site, it was reportedly breaking quite a few. I updated several core utilities and applications then restored a recent backup not losing too much news and only about and estimated 500 to 1000 hit counts. I hope not to make that mistake again.

I'd like to mark this occasion with a small champagne toast, but a virtual one will have to do. Cheers! And thanks to everyone. Ain't the Linux community great!?

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.