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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Intel Open Sources Snap Cloud Telemetry Tool to Promote Cloud for All

    Intel's latest move in its "Cloud for All" initiative -- which it says will accelerate enterprise adoption of public, private and hybrid clouds -- is an open source tool called snap, which helps organizations understand the telemetry of their clouds.

  • Thunderbird 38.4.0 Brings A Bunch Of FIxes Only
  • Advancing Content

    One of the many benefits of the Web is the ability to create unique, personalized experiences for individual users. We believe that this personalization needs to be done with respect for the user – with transparency, choice and control. When the user is at the center of product experiences everyone benefits.

  • What's the Intersection of Docker and OpenStack? [VIDEO]

    OpenStack and Docker are both open source technologies with a lot of excitement and momentum behind them. But where is the intersection between Docker and OpenStack? And why isn't Docker Inc part of the OpenStack Foundation?

    In a video interview, Ben Golub, CEO of Docker Inc. the lead commercial sponsor behind the open source Docker engine, explains where it all fits together.

    At a high-level, OpenStack is a popular widely deployed Infrastructure-as-a-Service open source platform, while Docker provide an open-source container technology to build, deploy and manage containers. Golub noted that organizations are using Docker together with various flavors of OpenStack from different vendors including HP, Red Hat and Mirantis.

  • WordPress.com is Now Open Source, Desktop App Available for Download

    WordPress has updated its fully hosted version WordPress.com with one of the biggest features ever.

    The update, which has been codenamed Calypso, brings all new abilities to this platform.

  • OpenHardware and code signing (update)

    I posted a few weeks ago about the difficulty of providing device-side verification of firmware updates, at the same time remaining OpenHardware and thus easily hackable. The general consensus was that allowing anyone to write any kind of firmware to the device without additional authentication was probably a bad idea, even for OpenHardware devices. I think I’ve come up with an acceptable compromise I can write up as a recommendation, as per usual using the ColorHug+ as an example. For some background, I’ve sold nearly 3,000 original ColorHug devices, and in the last 4 years just three people wanted help writing custom firmware, so I hope you can see the need to protect the majority is so much larger than making the power users happy.

  • How old were you when you started learning how to program?
  • So you think that you know what "hacker"means?

    Given the negative connotation of the term today, I recall my surprise when I first read (alas, the source has long been forgotten) that in the world of mainframe computer in the 1960's, where the principal revenue stream were licensing fees for the hardware, "hacker" referred to a person who was encouraged to tinker with the software to improve its performance. After all, there was no or little money to be made in the software per se, so that any improvements in performance would only serve to enhance the value of the mainframe itself. Hacking appeared to be a beneficial activity in support of the hardware.

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