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Getting Qt 5 right in your application

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KDE

I’m sure many of you already read about Clazy. For those who didn’t, it’s a quite convenient tool for checking your code and making sure you’re getting Qt’s API right. There’s some non-trivial quirks here and there that aren’t very important but once polished can push your system considerably, especially on those cases that are ran repeatedly.

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Programming Leftovers

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.29 on CRAN: Package Maintenance

    Release 0.6.29 of the digest package arrived at CRAN earlier today, and will be uploaded Debian shortly. digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, spookyhash, and blake3 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a mature and widely-used as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

  • What’s New In PHP 8.1? – CloudSavvy IT

    PHP 8.1 was released in November 2021 as the latest minor version of the PHP language. It adds several new language features alongside some smaller improvements and performance enhancements. There are a few breaking changes to be aware of but most upgrades from PHP 8.0 should be straightforward. [...] PHP 8.1 adds many new features that make the development experience easier and more streamlined. Enums have long been a missing piece of the type system while readonly properties and new in initializers will make it quicker to write new classes. Fibers help to make async PHP more approachable while first-class callables facilitate streamlined function references when practicing functional programming techniques. All these changes further mature PHP as a flexible language that offers strong safety guarantees for your code while still being simple to work with.

  • Turbo Rascal Is The Retro Pascal Compiler We Always Wanted | Hackaday

    Pascal is not one of the biggest programming languages these days; it’s fallen into the background as the world moved on to newfangled things like C#, Python and Java. However, the language has its fans, one of whom put together a new compiler which targets retro platforms – and it goes by the name Turbo Rascal. The list of supported platforms is extensive, with Turbo Rascal able to compile highly-optimized binaries for the C64, Amiga 500, BBC Micro, IBM PC, Atari ST, Game Boy, Amstrad, NES, ZX Spectrum, and more. There’s a usable IDE and even an included graphics editor for getting projects put together quickly. Also known by its full name of Turbo Rascal Syntax Error, or TRSE, it’s the work of one [Nicolaas Groeneboom].

  • Raku Advent Calendar: Batteries Included: Generating Thumbnails

    It was a cold wintry night in the North Pole and Santa was in a mood. “Naughty. Naughty. Naughty. Ni..aughty” he grumbled, checking his list. Then checking it again. “Everything ok?” chipped cheerful Sparkleface the elf, bouncing into the room. “Isn’t it nice to have some cold weather for a change?” Santa scowled at Sparkleface with an icy stare that froze all the water molecules in the room. He said nothing, gazing through Sparkleface into some distant place in another dimension. Undeterred, Sparkleface continued: “did you see all those wonderful images we’ve received from the children of the world who are looking forward to the holiday, and have been sending us pictures of what they want for Christmas? Isn’t it great that everyone has cell phones these days and can so easily send us high resolution images instead of writing out lists by hand like in the olden days?”

  • How to build and run your Python scripts in a web browser • The Register

    Python, one of the world's most popular programming languages, may soon become even more ubiquitous as it finds a home within web browsers. Ethan Smith, a Berkeley-based software developer, recently revealed a project that allows CPython, the default implementation of the Python programming language, to run within web browsers via WebAssembly, or WASM. WASM is a binary format that provides near-native performance within web browsers. It's a compilation target for languages like C/C++, C# and Rust. It's commonly used to create performance-sensitive code that JavaScript isn't well-suited to handle; wedding Python to WASM though its Emscripten compiler is more about ease of use and distribution than performance, at least at this point.

  • Qt 6.2.2 Released

    We have released Qt 6.2.2 today. Along with close to 300 new bug fixes it brings security updates, an updated MinGW compiler and re-introduces two modules especially beneficial for automotive customers.

  • Tocuched by the Bar | Coder Radio 442

    Mike visits Pallet Town and comes back with some SQLAlchemy performance wisdom to share. Meanwhile, struggling with a lack of performance, Chris has kicked the tires of his new M1 Max MacBook Pro and is ready to share his counter-narrative take on the new hardware.

Microsoft Being Evil

  • There’s finally a reason to use Microsoft Edge instead of Chrome [Ed: Microsoft trying anti-competitive tactics again, in effect orchestrating the situation wherein rival Web browsers won't work with its other stuff]
  • Why Windows failed to display Microsoft and Xbox sign-in dialogs

    Whenever I clicked a button that was supposed to open these dialogs, I might see a brief white flash that hinted at the brief appearance of a dialog window. Most of the time, absolutely nothing happened. Deep-rooted problems with Windows are incredibly difficult to troubleshoot. When developing its software, Microsoft always assumes everything will work flawlessly all the time. Apps and system services rarely generate log files, report errors to the Events system, or even record diagnostics data about the problem. The Diagnostics Viewer reported to Microsoft that I’d opened the desired dialog for less than a millisecond and that everything was fine.

  • Microsoft under fire for baking "buy now, pay later" option into Edge browser • Eurogamer.net [Ed: Microsoft = debt]

    The option allows Edge to suggest a sponsored BNPL payment method when customers begin entering their card numbers into retail sites - even if specific sites do not offer it natively. Microsoft has signed a deal with third-party BNPL company Zip (previously Quadpay) to feature the sign-up option on retail checkout pages at browser level, for any purchase Edge detects between $35 to $1000.

Games: Rainbow Six Siege, Stream, GOG, Wine, and More

  • Ubisoft Could Work on 'Rainbow Six Siege' Proton Support If More Linux Users Show Interest - It's FOSS News

    Rainbow Six Siege is a popular multiplayer FPS game that utilizes the BattleEye anti-cheat engine. Primarily, it does not support Linux. However, now that anti-cheat engines like BattleEye and Easy Anti-Cheat have added official support for Proton, many Linux users hope to get support for popular multiplayer titles that did not work with Linux. Of course, you can always have Windows in dual-boot to play those titles. But, many users use Linux exclusively and cannot play Rainbow Six Siege even if they want to (or have it in their Steam library).

  • Collabora announced Venus, 3D accelerated Vulkan in QEMU | GamingOnLinux

    Well this is quite exciting. Collabora, the open source consulting firm that often works with Valve, has announced the experimental Venus driver for 3D acceleration of Vulkan applications in QEMU. For those not familiar, QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer. "Running graphics applications in a Guest OS can be annoying as they are generally greedy of computing resources, and that can slow you down or give you a bad experience in terms of graphics performance. Being able to accelerate all this by offloading the workload to the hardware can be a great deal. The VirtIO-GPU virtual GPU device comes into play here, allowing a Guest OS to send graphics commands to it through OpenGL or Vulkan. While we are already there with OpenGL, we can not say the same for Vulkan. Well, until now."

  • As GOG struggles, Steam hit a new high of 27M people online

    Recently we had news that DRM-free store GOG has been struggling with losses, and here's Steam continuing to just smash through previous records. With the previous all-time high of 26,922,926 users online back in April 2021, on November 28 it yet again broke the record with 27,384,959 according to SteamDB. At the time the record hit, around 7.8 million were actually in-game and while it's of course spread across so many, the winner continues to be Valve's own free to play Counter-Strike: Global Offensive with about 915,791 online playing.

  • Valve reportedly developing a Half-Life shooter-strategy hybrid | GamingOnLinux

    There's been some reports circulating thanks to YouTuber Tyler McVicker (previously known as Valve News Network) that goes into some detail about what Valve is up to. Seems like we might get an RTS/FPS hybrid for the Steam Deck. It seems that Half-Life 3 continues to not be a thing too. Sounds like it will be called Citadel, or perhaps Half-Life: Citadel and will be "a co-operative, competitive, asymmetric, third-person, first-person, RTS, FPS, shooter-hybrid thing that takes place in the Half-Life universe" according to McVicker. Matches seem like they will be some sort of battle between NPCs, with you earning things to give to them using a wave-based system for the battling. The video states that Source 2 has been significantly upgraded with a new lighting system, and new NPC systems too. It's a lot to take in and sounds pretty wild.

  • The Elder Scrolls: Arena reimplementation OpenTESArena gets a big upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    While it's currently still in heavy development, OpenTESArena is another great example of what can be done with open source with it reimplementing The Elder Scrolls: Arena in a modern cross-platform game engine. It requires a copy of the original game for the data files, which you can get free officially. It's not quite playable — yet, but it is showing massive promise and a new release is out now.

  • How to run Windows software on Linux

    In this article you will learn how to run windows applications on Linux/Ubuntu 18.04 using Wine and other alternatives. Wine ( Wine Is Not an Emulator ), is an open source application which is provided as a compatibility layer in Linux . It is used to bridge the gap between Linux and windows worlds so that applications that are meant for Windows could run on Linux. An emulator or a virtual machine would simulate internal Windows logic whereas Wine would transform Windows logic into native UNIX/POSIX compliant logic. This is said, not all Windows based applications can run on Linux and even if they do run, their behavior will differ from that in their natural Windows environment. Wine has a database (AppDB) which lists all applications that have been properly tested and confirmed to work on Linux.

today's howtos

  1. How to Install Google Fonts on Fedora Desktop

    Google Fonts is a free interactive directory of over 1200 font families that Google has made available to developers and designers. The project was developed in 2010 to combat the licensing and compatibility issues that web developers faced when using proprietary fonts. Most of the fonts are published under the SIL Open Font License and others under Apache. This has enabled users to make use of fonts on their websites and in different projects without the need to upload them to their own servers.

  2. Edit audio on Linux with Audacity | Opensource.com

    The Audacity sound editor is one of those open source applications that filled a niche that seemingly nobody else realized existed. Initially developed at Carnegie Mellon University at a time when many people still thought computers were just for office and schoolwork, and you required special DSP peripherals for serious multimedia work. Audacity recognized that, occasionally, the average computer user needed to edit audio. The Audacity team has consistently provided an open source application for recording and cleaning up sound in the two decades since. I use Audacity a lot, and being an editor by training, I'm used to significant and usually single-key keyboard shortcuts in my applications. By building shortcuts around single letters, you can have one hand on the mouse and one on the keyboard, so the delay between choosing a tool or an important function and clicking the mouse is mere milliseconds. Throughout this article, I'll highlight the keyboard shortcut I use in Audacity if you want to optimize your own settings.

  3. How to Install Telegram Desktop on ArchLinux – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to install Telegram desktop on our ArchLinux. Telegram is a freeware, cross-platform, cloud-based instant messaging service. The service provides end-to-end encrypted video calling, VoIP, file sharing, etc.

  4. How to Install Google Chrome on CentOS 9 Stream

    Google Chrome is the most used Internet Explorer software on the earth, with a recent update in 2021 that Chrome is currently the primary browser of more than 2.65 billion internet users. However, as you would know, after installing CentOS 9 Stream, only Mozilla Firefox is packaged with the distribution but luckily, installing Google Chrome is a straightforward task. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Google Chrome in three various ways in stable, beta, or unstable versions on CentOS 9 Stream.

  5. How to Add User to Sudoers on CentOS Stream

    When installing CentOS Stream, the user account created during the initial setup has sudo rights if you selected the user to be an admin and create a root account. However, there may be a need to add additional sudo users or to remove the access. This is a straightforward process with a few commands. In the following tutorial, you will learn to add a user to the sudoers group on any CentOS Stream distribution.

  6. Scp Command In Linux Example : How To Use SCP Commands To Securely Transfer Files | Itsubuntu.com

    SCP is a protocol for securely transferring files between a local host and a remote host, or between two remote hosts. It is based on the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol. “SCP” refers to the Secure Copy Protocol. SCP or Secure copy protocol is easy to use and is included by default in most Linux and Unix distributions.

  7. How To Use Guake Terminal Under Wayland (GNOME) - Linux Uprising Blog

    This article explains how to get Guake drop-down terminal to work properly under Wayland (GNOME). I've tested this using GNOME desktop running on Ubuntu 21.10 with a single monitor, because I currently don't have access to multiple monitors. Guake is a Python-based drop-down terminal for the GNOME desktop which includes split terminal functionality, session save/restore (restores panes and tabs), support for transparency, and many other features. It's inspired by the famous Quake console - the terminal stays hidden until you press a key (default is F12). Execute a command, then press the same key again to hide the terminal, going back to your previous task without breaking your workflow. You can also set Guake to automatically hide when it loses focus.