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Firefox 2.0 changes small but significant

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Moz/FF

A beta version of Firefox 2.0, the open source browser taking the Internet by storm, was released late last week and it is fast becoming my preferred browser. Here I'll look at just a few of the changes and new features that really make this browser work for me.

At first glance there is little to mark Firefox 2.0 from its predecessor. The icons are the same and the similarity of layout makes it hard to tell the two apart. The only immediate sign of change is the inclusion of a "History" item in the top menu bar. The History menu item hides the first great feature of Firefox 2.0: How often have you closed a tab in your browser and just as it disappears off screen you realise that you closed the wrong one? We all do it, but if you're using Firefox 2.0 click on History which has a record of your most recently closed tabs and then tell Firefox to re-instate the closed tab. A much neater option than opening up your history and trying to work out what you just closed.

Firefox 2.0 also deals with crashes much better.

Full Story.

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