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today's leftovers

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  • Apple CEO Tim Cook lashes out at Google’s Chromebooks

    Chromebooks have been for quite some time now, and that success has also happened in the classroom. Many schools have opted for Chromebooks over more expensive laptops or iPads from Apple, and that doesn’t sit well with Apple CEO Tim Cook.

    [...]

    While I can understand why the success of Chromebooks has irritated Apple’s CEO, I’m glad that they are available for the students and schools that want to use them. Chromebooks aren’t perfect but they definitely offer a low-cost and very viable alternative to more expensive devices, and they work amazingly well for the folks that use them.

    And what is wrong with that? It’s good that schools and students have options these days. I remember the dark days when everything was Microsoft-oriented, and I’m very happy that those days are well and truly behind us. Those were the dark ages of computing, and I never liked the idea of one company owning a particular market. Competition breeds innovation, and it offers real choices for consumers.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook labelled 'out of touch' after naming Chromebooks test machines

    TIM COOK has been labelled "out of touch with reality" after his comments that Google Chromebooks are merely "test machines" and are only successful because they are cheap.

    Cook made the remarks during an interview with Buzzfeed during a surprise visit to Apple's new Upper East Side retail store in New York ahead of its Hour of Code program, which kicked off in all of its retail stores on Thursday.

    A small education technology firm called Neverware has since been so outraged by his remarks that it has decided to write to the Apple CEO and give him a good telling off.

  • Dell Will Begin Making Their UEFI Firmware Easy To Update From Linux
  • Dell Frees UEFI, iXsystems Wins Double Silver & More…

    Dell Fixing UEFI for Linux? Linux users may be able to update their UEFI firmware on devices, if Dell has their way. The computer manufacturing giant is looking at making things easier for Linux users, and Richard Hughes writes on his GNOME blog that this capability might be available as early as Fedora 24. “With Dell on board, I’m hoping it will give some of the other vendors enough confidence in the LVFS to talk about distributing their own firmware in public,” Hughes writes, and we have our fingers crossed here.

  • HPC Myths Need Not Hamper the Technology’s Growth

    Many HPC systems use standard operating systems, most notably Linux, which increases the familiarity for most network administrators. HPC manufacturers have also taken steps in recent years to improve the usability of their systems. In fact, more business users now directly access HPC servers and clusters to run high-end data analysis applications.

  • Containers Gain Fans: From Finance to Entertainment Worlds

    In the last several years, the hype surrounding containers has grown, but so has their usage. At the Tectonic Summit earlier this month, the focus wasn't on hype, but rather on real-world use-cases, as container technology enters mainstream IT. Tectonic is a commercial product built by CoreOS, and includes CoreOS Linux as the operating system, the rocket (Rkt) container platform and the Kubernetes container management system. CoreOS competes and collaborates with Docker Inc., the lead commercial sponsor of Docker containers. Users and real-world deployment stories dominated the event. Financial services firms were well-represented among the users. Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch discussed how and why they are using containers. The International Securities Exchange (ISE) explained how it is using a CoreOS container-based infrastructure to enable its trading platform and 150 million messages a minute. Also at the summit, entertainment giant Viacom detailed how it's using containers and why it's moving the popular MTV.com Website to a container infrastructure. We look at some of the highlights of the Tectonic Summit as well as the use cases presented.

  • Xiaopan OS - Pentesting Distribution for Wireless Security Enthusiasts
  • ROSA Desktop Fresh R6 Linux OS Switches to the LXQt 0.10.0 Desktop Environment

    The developers behind the ROSA GNU/Linux operating system have announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first ROSA Desktop Fresh R6 LXQt edition of the project.

  • C++ ABI change
  • Arch Linux Switches To The New C++ ABI

    The noted posted this morning to ArchLinux.org confirms the switch to the new ABI. Arch Linux developers recommend rebuilding all non-repo packages against the new application binary interface.

  • Manjaro Linux Project Releases KDE Plasma 5.5 Live Media, Download Now

    The Manjaro development team, through Philip Müller, has had the pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the first development release of Manjaro Linux 15.12 "Capella" KDE Plasma 5.5 Live OS.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2015/50

    The last week was no perfect one for openSUSE Tumbleweed: not a single snapshot could be published. Sadly, there were some issues with OBS ‘refusing to build’ new medias, which means snapshots could not be passed on to openQA or even be considered for release.

  • Bits from the Debian Continuous Integration project

    It’s been almost 2 years since the Debian Continuous Integration project has been launched, and it has proven to be a useful resource for the development of Debian.

  • Why You Should Go To UbuCon in Los Angeles in January

    The 21st – 22nd January 2016 are some important dates you need to pencil into your calendar. The reason? That is when the UbuCon Summit is happening in Pasadena, California, USA.

  • Meet Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa Cinnamon Edition – Video Overview and Screenshots

    Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon has been released and announced by Linux Mint Team, this release featuring the latest version cinnamon 2.8 desktop environment, based-on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, linux kernel 3.19, Xorg 1.17, Mesa 10.5.9 and will get updates and security patch until 2019.

  • Mint 17.3 (Rosa) on the Dell XPS 13 (9343)

    I’m a big fan of the Dell XPS 13. It is the first laptop I’ve felt an emotional attachment to since my first Powerbook. The only issue is that I have not been able to run my distro of choice, Linux Mint, due to severe issues with the trackpad.

  • Rikomagic MK36S is a Windows or Ubuntu mini PC with a Cherry Trail CPU

    Rikomagic’s latest mini-desktop computer features an Intel Atom x5-Z8300 Cherry Trail quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and 802.11ac WiFi.

  • 3 open hardware projects for beginners

    I'm part of the Lunchbox Electronics team where we create innovative, new products with great imagination and passion for open source hardware. Our goal is to combine the art and engineering of an R&D Lab with playful products and projects. We believe that learning should be intuitive and fun.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Kiwi TCMS: Call for participation: Testing and Automation devroom, FOSDEM'22

    Attention testers! On behalf of Testing and Automation devroom we'd like to announce that call for participation is now open.

  • LLVM Clang 14 Lands An "Amazing" Performance Optimization - Phoronix

    While the performance of LLVM/Clang has improved a lot over the years and for x86_64 and AArch64 can be neck-and-neck with the GCC compiler, the fierce performance battle is not over. With LLVM/Clang 14.0 due out in the early months of 2022 will be more performance work with one recent commit in particular showing a lot of promise. LLVM developer Djordje Todorovic recently landed an improvement to LLVM's Loop Invariant Code Motion (LICM) Pass for being able to hoist a LOAD without STORE. The patch explains, "When doing load/store promotion within LICM, if we cannot prove that it is safe to sink the store we won't hoist the load, even though we can prove the load could be dereferenced and moved outside the loop. This patch implements the load promotion by moving it in the loop preheader by inserting proper PHI in the loop. The store is kept as is in the loop. By doing this, we avoid doing the load from a memory location in each iteration." The improvement to this pass helps to address this bug report around missed opportunities for register promotion.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.6 on CRAN: Package Maintenance

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN this morning. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. This release makes a tiny code change, remove a YAML file for the disgraced former continuous integration service we shall not name (yet that we all used to use). And just like digest five days ago, drat four days ago, littler three days ago, RcppAPT two days ago, and RcppSpdlog yesterday, we converted the vignettes from using the minidown package to the (fairly new) simplermarkdown package which is so much more appropriate for our use of the minimal water.css style.

  • Takao Fujiwara: gnome-remote-desktop

    Seems Vino is deprecated in Fedora 35 because of the security issue and gnome-remote-desktop is the replacement but there are a few document to setup the VNC server and let me summarize the setup and differences.

  • No easter eggs in curl

    There are no Easter eggs in curl. For the good. I’ve been asked about this many times. Among the enthusiast community, people seem to generally like the concept of Easter eggs and hidden treasures, features and jokes in software and devices. Having such an embedded surprise is considered fun and curl being a cool and interesting project should be fun too! With the risk of completely ruining my chances of ever being considered a fun person, I’ll take you through my thought process on why curl does not feature any such Easter eggs and why it will not have any in the future either.

  • Tricked-Out Breadboard Automatically Draws Schematics Of Whatever You Build | Hackaday

    When it comes to electronic design, breadboarding a circuit is the fun part — the creative juices flow, parts come and go, jumpers build into a tangled mess, but it’s all worth it when the circuit finally comes to life. Then comes the “What have I done?” phase, where you’ve got to backtrack through the circuit to document exactly how you built it. If only there was a better way. Thanks to [Nick Bild], there is, in the form of the “Schematic-o-matic”, which aims to automate the breadboard documentation process. The trick is using a breadboard where each bus bar is connected to an IO pin on an Arduino Due. A program runs through each point on the breadboard, running a continuity test to see if there’s a jumper connecting them. A Python program then uses the connection list, along with some basic information about where components are plugged into the board, to generate a KiCad schematic.

  • Multiplication by Halving and Doubling in AARCH64 Assembly | Adam Young’s Web Log

    While multiplication is defined in the context of repeated addition, implementing it that way algorithmically is not nearly as efficient as some other approaches. One algorithm for multiplication that is an order of magnitude faster is to halve one number while doubling the other. I gave myself the challenge of implementing this algorithm in AARCH64 Assembly, and it was not too hard.

  • The Apache Weekly News Round-up: week ending 3 December 2021

    Welcome, December --we're opening the month with another great week. Here's what the Apache community has been up to...

  • Website Load Testing with Apache JMeter on Ubuntu 20.04

    In this article, I will show you how to install Apache JMeter and how to use it to do load testing on websites. JMeter is an open-source Java-based load testing tool. It is useful to check and improve the performance after developing a new website. With load tests, it checks the performance of the system and helps to stimulate the weight of the load. As it is mainly focused on testing web applications, one can make a better website for all the users. But now, it is also used for different other purposes like functional testing and database testing. Now let’s see how to install the Apache JMeter and use it on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • gfldex: MAIN course

    On IRC vasko asked how to handle a --verbose-flag. This is quite simple.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.49 Adventing Is On!
  • Bash Shell Scripting for beginners (Part 3)

    Welcome to part 3 of Bash Shell Scripting at a beginner level. This final article will look at a few more items that will get you primed for your continued personal development. It will touch on functions, using comparisons with if/elif statements, and will wrap up with looking into the while loop.

Graphics: Mali, GRVK, Vulkan

  • Mesa Begins Trek Bringing Up Arm Mali "Valhall" Graphics - Phoronix

    The Panfrost Gallium3D OpenGL driver and PanVK open-source drivers in Mesa have come a long way via reverse-engineering for Arm Mali graphics support. However, to this point the focus has been on Arm's "Midgard" and "Bifrost" architectures while the newer "Valhall" architecture has been around the past two years. The Panfrost effort for bringing up Valhall is now getting underway. Alyssa Rosenzweig who has led the Panfrost effort for open-source Arm Mali graphics has been working for a while now on getting Arm's Valhall architecture reverse-engineered and supported by the Linux graphics driver code. (That's also in addition to her separate work on reverse-engineering the Apple M1 graphics as another ongoing open-source adventure.)

  • GRVK 0.5 Gets Battlefield 4 Running With AMD's Mantle Over Vulkan API - Phoronix

    It's been a number of months since GRVK 0.4 as the open-source project re-implementing AMD's defunct Mantle API over the modern Vulkan API that was originally based on the former. With Sunday's release of GRVK 0.5, this Mantle-on-Vulkan translation layer is now capable of correctly rendering Battlefield 4. Battlefield 4 back in the day was one of the flagship titles having a native Mantle renderer for that AMD-specific graphics API. Battlefield 4 was a flagship title for Mantle and one of the few games using this API along with the likes of Battlefield Hardline, Thief, Sniper Elite III, and others.

  • Radeon RADV Driver Lands Vulkan Dynamic Rendering Support - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa 22.0 on Sunday night was the Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" support for the recently introduced VK_KHR_dynamic_rendering extension. VK_KHR_dynamic_rendering premiered last month with Vulkan 1.2.197. This new extension allows for creating single-pass render pass instances without the need of creating render pass objects or frame-buffers. The Khronos documentation on dynamic rendering explains, "If you’re not using multiple subpasses or input attachments though, go ahead, rip those render pass objects right out! Dynamic rendering offers similar rendering performance to a single pass render pass object but with a much simpler interface on all implementations. Hopefully this extension will make writing future Vulkan renderers just a bit more enjoyable."

Games: AssaultCube Release, Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun - Aiko's Choice, and More

  • AssaultCube 1.3 Free Multiplayer Shooter is Finally Here

    AssaultCube hasn’t seen a new release since 2013, but now it’s back with AssaultCube 1.3 Lockdown Edition to the delight of all Linux fans. AssaultCube is a name which probably plenty of Linux users know but haven’t heard anything of in a long time. For those of you unaware, it’s a free multiplayer first-person shooter game, based on the CUBE engine. The game is available free of charge to download for Microsoft Windows, Linux and macOS. Although the main focus of AssaultCube is multiplayer online gaming, a single player mode consists of computer-controlled bots. The game has a ton of fan made maps, and the game comes with like 45.

  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun - Aiko's Choice is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun - Aiko's Choice, the new standalone addon to the very popular stealth tactics game Shadow Tactics is out now. Focusing on one of the main game's protagonists: the kunoichi adept Aiko. She is a master of camouflage and distracts enemies disguised as a geisha. While Aiko was certain that she left her old life behind, her former sensei, the cunning spymaster Lady Chiyo, reappears from the shadows to challenge her. Together with her friends—a group of deadly assassins—she sets out to hunt down the ghosts of her past.

  • Arch User Reacts To Linus Tech Tips Linux Challenge Pt 3 - Invidious

    We're back for the 3rd part of the Linux Tech Tips linux challenge and this week went surprisingly well, I mean really well I didn't even have anything to say about most of the video. For basic user tasks Linus and Luke have sort of got used to using Linux.

  • jJonathan Dowland: Sixth Annual UK System Research Challenges Workshop lightning talk

    in 2018 I talked about some hack I'd made to the classic computer game Doom from 1993. I've done several hacks to Doom that I could probably talk about except I've become a bit uncomfortable about increasingly being thought of as "that doom guy". I'd been reflecting on why it was that I continued to mess about with that game in the first place and I realised it was a form of expression: I was treating Doom like a canvas.

Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical Data Platform, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, and Google Clown

  • Canonical Data Platform 2021 winter roundup | Ubuntu

    It’s that time of the year again: many folks are panic buying cans of windscreen de-icer spray and thermal underwear, bringing pine trees into the front room and preparing to enjoy an extended break with the family. So we thought to ourselves, what better time than now to take a look back at the year gone by on the Canonical Data Platform?

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 712

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 712 for the week of November 28 – December 4, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Deploy Container on Ubuntu Pro on Google Cloud | Ubuntu

    Since I wrote Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud last week, I kept thinking about putting Ubuntu Desktop into containers. A container is an independent unit of software packages and their dependencies so that the application on the container can run reliably in different computing environments. Docker, an open-source project launched in 2013, made Container technology popular all over the world in just a few years. Why? Let’s compare Containers and Virtual Machines.