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LibreOffice 5.0.4 Important Update to Launch Really Soon

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LibO

A new Release Candidate for the LibreOffice 5.0.4 branch has been revealed by The Document Foundation, and it looks like the final version is just around the corner.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft FUD, Openwashing and Entryism

Games: ARMA 3, Steam Play, Valve and More

  • For now, the experimental Linux (and Mac) port of ARMA 3 will not see any more updates
    Sad news for those who purchased ARMA 3 due to the experimental Linux (and Mac) version, as Bohemia Interactive have announced a halt to the updates for it.
  • There's a brand new Steam Play Beta version out with FAudio, also a Steam Play whitelist update
    The day I'm sure many have waited for has arrived, a new Steam Play beta has been officially released today which includes the important FAudio project. On top of that, even more titles have entered the Steam Play whitelist. Don't know what the heck Steam Play is? The "too long; didn't read" is that it enables you to play a lot of Windows games on Linux.
  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Play Proton 3.16 Beta, 29 More Games Supported
    A new beta relase of Proton 3.16 is now available, the Wine-based software that powers Valve's Steam Play for running many Windows games on Linux.
  • Volcanoids, a steampunk base-building survival game may come to Linux, developer testing
    I know what you're going to say, something about yet another survival game! However, Volcanoids really does look like something you want to pay attention to. I forget who, but someone mentioned this game to me a while ago. The developer seemed interested, but I didn't see them say much about it—until now thanks to another tip. On Steam, a user posted in their forum asking about Linux support and the developer replied showing a screenshot of their progress on a Linux build. The skybox is missing, plus a few other issues but it's promising.
  • Desert Child is a thrilling racing adventure now available with Linux support
    Developed by Oscar Brittain, Desert Child is a fantastic pixel art racing adventure that just released with Linux support.
  • Koruldia Heritage, the awesome looking pixel-painted adventure RPG is fully funded and heading to Linux
    Fully funded on Kickstarter and heading to Linux, the pixel-painted adventure RPG Koruldia Heritage is looking awesome. Against their initial goal of £10K they've smoothly sailed over £15K and so with 6 days left they've done pretty well. It's still not a large amount of money for a team to make such an ambitious game, but it has been in development for a few years already. The funding here, is for some additional help towards the finishing line.
  • The super sweet survival and base-builder 'MewnBase' is now on Steam
    For those who prefer their survival games to be single-player and a little sweeter, MewnBase is now on Steam. Currently, the developer says it's mostly a spare-time gig and so updates aren't always that frequent. It's in Early Access and so it's not finished, with an end-date projected to be by the end of 2019. Hopefully with the Steam release, it will give the developer some additional sales and exposure to progress forwards.
  • The absolutely excellent platformer Slime-san now has a level editor
    Easily one of the best and trickiest platformers around, Slime-san is a seriously underappreciated gem. Another big update recently released, adding in a level editor. Honestly, I don't understand why it has so few reviews and followers. Slime-san is practically one of the best platformers around if you're looking for a true challenge that won't be over quickly.
  • The Universim continues advancing with a crime system, firefighters and more
    Just recently, they put out a whopper of an update which makes the game perform a lot better thanks to a number of optimisations. It performs consistently well above 100FPS and feels noticeably smooth now. They even fixed the issue I noted with the saving system causing massive stuttering, so that's great. Still not sold on needing a building to save, it's a gimmick that doesn't appeal to me but it's a minor gripe. As for the bigger parts of the update, they've introduced a full crime system with police stations where your people can become officers, prisons with guards and so on. You will need to catch criminals quickly, as things can soon escalate from minor crimes to setting everything on fire—ouch! There's two ways to deal with your "nuggets" (your people), you can either fry them up using brutal methods like the electric chair or my preferred method with a Rehabilitation Centre for some therapy to help them deal with their issues.
  • The fun indie FPS 'Ballistic Overkill' adds a new amusing game mode called Juggernaut
    While not as popular as it once was, Ballistic Overkill is still a reasonably good online shooter that I've spent a lot of time in. The latest update sounds quite amusing. If the normal team modes aren't for you, the Juggernaut mode just might be. In this mode, there's a special golden Chainsaw on each map waiting to be grabbed. Once picked up, that player turns into the Juggernaut, a special class with a lot of health. You gain points for the length of time you stay in this mode, however, every other player will know where you are and will try to take you down.
  • ReignMaker 2 combines Match-3 gameplay with Tower Defense and more genres spliced together
    Frogdice, developer of ReignMaker, Stash, Dungeon of Elements and more is back with a new Kickstarter campaign for their genre bending game ReignMaker 2. With a low goal of £799, they've already crossed the finishing line and then some with over £3K pledged so it looks like it's good to go. They're planning Linux support like with their past games, so we should see it sometime around April next year.

Audiocasts: LINUX Unplugged and More

How Java has stood the test of time

Java initially appeared in 1995, evolving from a 1991 innovation called "Oak." It was apparently the right time for engineers looking to grow distributed systems. Some of the more popular languages back then — C, C++, and even Cobol for some efforts — involved steep learning curves. Java's multi-threading, allowing the concurrent execution of two or more parts of a program, ended the struggle to get multi-tasking working. Java quickly became the de facto language for mission-critical systems. Since that time, new languages have come and gone, but Java has remained entrenched and hard to replace. In fact, Java has stood as one of the top two computing languages practically since its initial appearance, as this Top Programming Languages article suggests. Read more