Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interview with Novell's John Dragoon

Filed under
Interviews

SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10 is finally here, and so begins Novell's effort to get it onto as many business computers as possible. This event also comes shortly after the departure of Jack Messman as CEO, an event which has dramatically changed Novell's business strategy, especially as it relates to its SUSE Linux products. To find out more about SLED, its cousin SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), and the company's plans for the future, I got in touch with senior Novell executive John Dragoon. Questions and answers are below.

What company is the single biggest threat to SUSE Linux Enterprise adoption? What is Novell doing to erode that threat?

We prefer to look at the market in terms of opportunity We don't view any company as the single biggest threat to SUSE Linux Enterprise adoption. We have multiple competitors in the market -- Microsoft, Red Hat, Sun, just to name a few. We're very early in a 15 to 20 year operating systems lifecycle and I believe Novell is uniquely position to drive and realize a lot of the opportunity. Specifically, our Linux offerings are addressing the enterprise wide needs for a vertically integrated Linux offering. By that I mean the same code base (and skill requirements) for Linux server, desktop, data center, real time, point of service, etc deployments - all of which Novell offers. While our competitors (Linux specifically) offer some of these capabilities, none offer the enterprise breadth and depth we do with the global ecosystem and support behind it.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

New Releases

Notifications Without User Interaction on Ubuntu Are Annoying

The Unity desktop environment has a simple and rather ineffective system notification mechanism and it looks like that's not going to change, not even with the arrival of Unity 8. Read more

Librem Linux Laptop Drops NVIDIA Graphics But Still Coming Up Short Of Goal

One of the oddest things I found about the crowd-funded Librem 15 laptop when writing about it last month was that it wanted to be open-source down to the component firmware/microcode yet they opted to ship with a NVIDIA GPU. In an updated earlier this month, at least they came to their senses and dropped the discrete NVIDIA GPU. While I have no problems recommending NVIDIA graphics for Linux gamers and those wanting the best performance, that's only when using the proprietary drivers, and certainly wouldn't recommend it for a fully open-source system -- NVIDIA on the desktop side doesn't do much for the open-source drivers, let alone down to the firmware/microcode level. Instead the Librem folks have opted to upgrade the design to using an Intel Core i7 4770HQ processor that features more powerful Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics, which isn't as powerful as a discrete NVIDIA GPU but at least is more open-source friendly. Read more

Ruby 2.2.0 Released

We are pleased to announce the release of Ruby 2.2.0. Ruby 2.2 includes many new features and improvements for the increasingly diverse and expanding demands for Ruby. Read more