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Interview with Novell's John Dragoon

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10 is finally here, and so begins Novell's effort to get it onto as many business computers as possible. This event also comes shortly after the departure of Jack Messman as CEO, an event which has dramatically changed Novell's business strategy, especially as it relates to its SUSE Linux products. To find out more about SLED, its cousin SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), and the company's plans for the future, I got in touch with senior Novell executive John Dragoon. Questions and answers are below.

What company is the single biggest threat to SUSE Linux Enterprise adoption? What is Novell doing to erode that threat?

We prefer to look at the market in terms of opportunity We don't view any company as the single biggest threat to SUSE Linux Enterprise adoption. We have multiple competitors in the market -- Microsoft, Red Hat, Sun, just to name a few. We're very early in a 15 to 20 year operating systems lifecycle and I believe Novell is uniquely position to drive and realize a lot of the opportunity. Specifically, our Linux offerings are addressing the enterprise wide needs for a vertically integrated Linux offering. By that I mean the same code base (and skill requirements) for Linux server, desktop, data center, real time, point of service, etc deployments - all of which Novell offers. While our competitors (Linux specifically) offer some of these capabilities, none offer the enterprise breadth and depth we do with the global ecosystem and support behind it.

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